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When asking a question, its title must be unique. When the title you enter has already been used for a question before yours, you'll get a popup:

A question with that title already exists; please be more specific.

This was done to "detect —and block— low-quality questions". I'm not really sure it does this properly. It's not uncommon to see titles like the following:

  • $commontitle $randomnumber
  • $commontitle $punctuation
  • "Error in" $commontitle
  • $tag $commontitle
  • $commontitle "help please"

Or a title like "Why doesn't this code work", where an editor with experience in the relevant tags can at least extract a basic problem description from the question body, like "Records won't update".

But once a question is posted with a less-than-perfect title, editing the title into merely $commontitle by removing fluff or rewriting it in its entirety is impossible, because that new title isn't unique. I don't think it's the editor's problem that the OP could not think of a unique title, and we shouldn't force editors to make up new titles for problems that aren't theirs*.

Obviously the kind of question I'm talking about here is those that we do want on the site, but which need some editing. So they're not (clearly) duplicate, they're reasonably on-topic, it's just that their title is sub-optimal.

Of course it's easy to work around this limitation by adding or changing random verbs or articles, but that's counter-productive and silly. A good title covers what's being asked in the question, you wouldn't need to add arbitrary "How to" or "Can I" in order to let that title pass the rigorous checks, and you'll one day run out of permutations as well.

Feature request: I would like for certain users, say > 2K, to be able to submit questions for edit with a title that already has been used before, given now the question already is on the site, but the title needs improvement.

*: In fact, given enough experience of the editor and enough context in the question, an editor could solve a question by properly editing the title, like "Why doesn't UPDATE ... WHERE 1 = 0 update my records?".


Related discussions:

  • 4
    Excellent use of a meme aside, +1. Maybe make it a warning instead of an error, as a duplicate title is often a valuable suggestion for a close-as-dupe target, though. – Cerbrus Feb 22 '16 at 10:37
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    It's not the editor's problem that the OP could not think of a unique title. Why? Either we're aiming for unique titles, and then it's the editor's problem as well as the questioner's problem, or we're aiming for better quality titles, and in that case I'm not sure unique titles are the solution in the first place. – Frédéric Hamidi Feb 22 '16 at 10:39
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    @Fred there's a huge gap between doing common maintenance (remove tags and buzzwords from titles, fix indentation in code, apply relevant tags) and thinking of a unique title that properly covers the OP's question. The latter is not necessarily the editor's problem. – CodeCaster Feb 22 '16 at 10:41
  • @CodeCaster, right, but why would want to change the title in that case? Go ahead and fix indentation and tags, maybe even try changing the title, and leave it as it is if you can't. – Frédéric Hamidi Feb 22 '16 at 10:43
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    @Fred so you're saying it's better to leave a title like "Help my code won't work" rather than trying to apply a generic title that at least superfluously describes the problem, albeit used before? – CodeCaster Feb 22 '16 at 10:44
  • 5
    Heh :) I'm saying I am not sure that changing the title into an already existing one is better than leaving it as it is, yes. Mainly because I do not know why we're enforcing unique titles in the first place, which problem it tries to solve, and whether or not this is an appropriate solution (see my first comment). – Frédéric Hamidi Feb 22 '16 at 10:46
  • 1
    @Fred alright, I get it now. I had that same question myself, but really didn't want to ask five separate meta questions to get the groundwork done for this one... – CodeCaster Feb 22 '16 at 10:47
  • Is this about duplicate title in general, or duplicate posts? For the former, I think we should just improve both titles to make it more unique. For the latter, I think seeing the same title on "Linked" section is confusing (though this is probably the weakest reason why duplicate title is not allowed). Otherwise, I kind of agree with this request, with additional condition if the question/answer has a score of 2 or more. – Andrew T. Feb 23 '16 at 6:09
  • @Andrew the scenario is: some editor reads a question and sees that the title needs improvement. That's all. I would like editors to be able to enter any title they want, even if it's already been used for some other question. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 6:45
  • 1
    When I've stumbled across this problem it has very often been because the question I'm editing is a worthless duplicate: if the OP had bothered to do a basic search of the site (searching for the precise exception message they have, for example) they would have found the answer to their question. The duplicate being edited does not act as a useful extra signpost to the canonical question; it provides no more pointers than the existing duplicates. The only reason the OP posted the question was because they did not bother reading the sign posts at all. – Raedwald Feb 23 '16 at 8:19
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    Just my opinion, but 2k isn't enough - I know it's a "detail" of the feature request, but I take this site seriously, and it wasn't until I was probably 4-5k reputation before I understood and "got" everything about SO and what we are trying to accomplish. – random_user_name Feb 24 '16 at 15:48
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Titles can often make or break questions. That's why we try to optimize the order of editing in the Help & Improvement queue; getting through the question first puts you in a better place to improve the title.

I can see a modicum of utility value to your request, if tags are basically treated as namespaces. How do I query a database? varies pretty vastly depending on the language at hand. But this is very easily remedied by just putting using Python at the end of the title.

There's also antiquated questions to consider. How do I query a database in Python might lose relevance. But this is very easily remedied by just putting in 2016 at the end of the title.

Past this, we start dealing with a swath of questions wearing paper bags on their heads with I'm not a duplicate! written on them, and we have to optimize for the majority case.

I'm having a difficult time envisioning enough cases where an identical title blocks a question that isn't a duplicate to strongly consider a back-way around the restriction.

What I like about your request is that it wouldn't come into play until the system trusts you to know what you're doing. But here's where I'm getting stuck on it:

  • The 'proper' use case is at best a handful out of thousands of questions each week, but we open up this back-way around the restriction to a whole lot of people. The bar to getting this would need to be much higher, say 15k, or perhaps gold tag badge holders.

  • If this is gated at a much higher level, how useful would it really be?

I don't think you're 'turd polishing' here, I do recognize the use case, but I'm not convinced that it isn't extremely rare. If it was a much bigger problem it would make sense to completely revisit the decision altogether, instead of tacking on a kludge.

How often, as in how many times each week is this actually a problem? I need to check and see how we log this and see about running a manual review of stuff that fits your scenario (2k+ user could not edit due to title duplicity). It's going to be next month, however, before I'm going to be able to sit down and do it - if you've got more examples, I'd love to look.

  • 14
    "But this is very easily remedied by just putting using Python at the end of the title." in b4 "don't put the tag in the title" – BoltClock Feb 23 '16 at 9:11
  • I'll immediately admit it's fairly rare. It's just so ... offputting to entirely edit a genuine question and get that popup in your face. I understand your concerns, so thanks for replying. I'll try to find some examples and add them to the question, but that'll invite a lot of people who'll want to show off how they can make up a proper title for that question... Which brings me back to my point: when copy editing, I generally don't really care for the content of a question (given that the question is on-topic and not duplicate), just formatting, spelling and removing tags from the title. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 9:13
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    Anyway I can live with "it's too rare to warrant a change", so I'll accept this answer. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 9:36
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    I think the biggest issue is that people, well, run out of titles. The biggest argument against this would be that we lose the ability to search for the good questions and answers (and search is already bad as it is). – Zizouz212 Feb 23 '16 at 13:56
  • 1
    The "How do I query a database in Python? 2016" option reminds me of the suggestion I made to ask intentional semi-duplicates about new versions. – Damian Yerrick Feb 23 '16 at 17:21
  • @BoltClock I can't find the quote but that means don't write your title as "[python] database doesn't open". However, "Database doesn't open in python" is a good title. – Tim Feb 24 '16 at 14:35
  • @Tim: I know. But a lot of people seem to disagree, thinking that language names don't belong in question titles, period - even if the title makes no sense without them. – BoltClock Feb 24 '16 at 14:37
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    @BoltClock sure. I'd suggest those are the people who need to learn the difference then - "Database won't open" is a wholly unhelpful title to a question. Not sure how I'd suggest they are educated however, and the line between tag and name could be blurred in some ways. – Tim Feb 24 '16 at 14:41
  • @Tim: We're on the same side :) – BoltClock Feb 24 '16 at 14:42
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    I run into this problem about once per month, and I'm just one user. I don't think this problem is "extremely rare". – Brian Feb 24 '16 at 19:08
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I think if you let people create exact duplicate titles it would make finding and closing exact duplicate questions much more efficient.

Anything with a exact duplicate title, could go straight to a review queue and be dealt with immediately.

  • Here is a review queue of 18000+ exact duplicate titles. Have fun. – Cœur Sep 25 '17 at 13:44
  • @Cœur - wow! that is a bunch of duplicates! – user177800 Sep 25 '17 at 13:58
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    And the count is growing with time, despite the current protection against duplicate titles. So yes, it could be turned into a real queue. – Cœur Sep 25 '17 at 14:04
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From your comment:

so you're saying it's better to leave a title like "Help my code won't work" rather than trying to apply a generic title that at least superfluously describes the problem, albeit used before?

That's certainly my take on it. If a question deserves an exact duplicate title to a question that already exists, most likely that question needs to be closed as a duplicate. Fixing the title isn't beneficial in that case.

At best, its sub-standard title might be useful, as a sign-post for people who don't really know what they're looking for and might stumble into the appropriate duplicate by following the same train of thought as the author of the poor title.

Of course, some titles are just horrible. Completely meaningless, uselessly vague, etc. But again, if the only good title would be a duplicate of some existing question, these are on posts that need to be closed. Possibly deleted completely. If not deleted, then an enthusiastic editor should try to come up with a non-duplicate title that will help serve as a signpost to the correct original, rather than just repeating that original's title.

Barring any of that, at least a bad title helps signal to community members that the question itself is poorly authored and probably in need of closing for some reason.

I don't think it's the editor's problem that the OP could not think of a unique title, and we shouldn't force editors to make up new titles for problems that aren't theirs*.

I don't agree with this. Editors will ideally improve more than just minor typos and syntactical cleanup. They will make the post more useful and comprehensible. This may well involve such things as reading the question for comprehension and then using their understanding of the question to creatively come up with a unique, useful title for the question. An editor who can't be bothered to paraphrase the question in a unique way should just leave that task to someone else who can (if needed at all…again, in many cases the post just needs to be closed, and possibly deleted).

You suggest in the question:

This was done to "detect —and block— low-quality questions". I'm not really sure it does this properly

To be sure, prohibiting duplicate titles does not completely block low-quality questions. If only there were some silver bullet that could do that.

But I would not be surprised at all to find that at the very least, it has significantly reduced the number of low-quality questions.

On the Internet, there are a seemingly large number of people who just don't care. They post bad questions, they up-vote bad questions, they even try to answer bad questions. But some people actually do care; blocking them from creating a post with a duplicate title can lead them to the original, allowing them to avoid posting at all. Similarly, blocking an editor after the fact from using a duplicate title encourages that well-intentioned editor to vote-to-close as "duplicate" and/or reword the title in such a way that it will help diligent searchers find the duplicate rather than posting yet another dupe.

Yes, there will always be idiots around who consciously bypass the "no duplicate titles" rule. But at least in doing so, they implicitly call themselves out as idiots, making it easier for the rest of us to know just who we're dealing with. :)


At the very least: if this feature is to be abandoned, it should be done so only after careful consideration of real data, including any documented change in duplicate-post numbers pre- and post-implementation of the original change. That the feature does not stop all bad posts is in no way proof that the feature itself is useless or undesirable.

It seems to me that your feature request would be a lot more palatable and justified if you were to support it with such data.

  • 1
    You based your entire reply on the premise that I'm turd polishing, or that people who use duplicate titles don't care about quality. This question is about titles of non-duplicate questions that need editing, so which are worth keeping on the site. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 8:23
  • "You based your entire reply on the premise that I'm turd polishing, or that people who use duplicate titles don't care about quality" -- that's simply not true. I realize that, being in disagreement with your basic premise, you are predisposed to view my reply unfavorably. But there's no reason for you to put words in my mouth nor take my response so personally. – Peter Duniho Feb 23 '16 at 9:13
  • "This question is about titles of non-duplicate questions that need editing, so which are worth keeping on the site" -- IMHO, there's no such thing. If the only possible title for a question is an exact duplicate of an already-present question, it simply is not possible that the new question is "worth keeping on the site". It must be a duplicate, and an uninteresting one at that. – Peter Duniho Feb 23 '16 at 9:14
  • The title is not the only thing that makes a question unique. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 9:15
  • "The title is not the only thing that makes a question unique" -- I never said it was. But if the only possible title for a post is one that is already correct for a different post, it simply cannot be that the new question is in fact different enough from the existing question to be considered worthwhile. More typically, it's actually not true that the title is the only possible title, and the author or editor simply hasn't put in the effort to create a distinctive enough title. – Peter Duniho Feb 23 '16 at 9:18
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    I'm not saying that the duplicate title is the only possible title. It's just that when editing, I tend to fix all common mistakes, such as removing tags and other typos from titles. Surely there can be a way to rephrase any title as to make it not duplicate, but I don't think you necessarily need to understand a question in order to be able to edit it. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 9:20
  • "I tend to fix all common mistakes, such as removing tags and other typos from titles" -- if you can't do that without stumbling across the "no duplicate title" rule, then just leave it for someone who can (i.e. someone willing to take the time to comprehend the question well enough to do so). Simply removing tags and typos and whatnot isn't going to improve the title well enough to matter; you'll still be left with a vague, duplicate title. – Peter Duniho Feb 23 '16 at 9:28
  • "vague" - yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man. A title without tags and typos is better than one with them. – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 9:29
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    "that's just your opinion" -- I'm no less entitled to have one than you are. In any case, you are the one asserting that the post is different in spite of having an identical title. That's the definition of a vague title; the title incompletely describes the post, making it look identical to another post even when it's not. How is that not ever vague? IMHO, in this context, "vague" is an objectively correct term to use. – Peter Duniho Feb 23 '16 at 9:39
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    I think I get your stance now, which seems to be "If you as an editor want to fix a title which contains tags or typos, only do so if you can think of a unique title". That's fine, but that does not confirm to my opinion, which is "A non-unique title without tags or typos is better than a unique title with them". – CodeCaster Feb 23 '16 at 12:19

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