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I just stumbled upon a few questions related to IBM Bluemix, where most of them are posted and answered by the same person. So far, that's fine with the Stack Overflow rules, as answering your own question is encouraged.

What I find more irritating is that all of the persons are employees of IBM and often also directly work on Bluemix.

The question at first looks genuine, though it's a bit confusing as the answer suggest the person did some attempts that didn't work and then reply to itself.

My actual problem with this is, there is no disclaimer that the person is working at/on Bluemix and is an employee of IBM.

This gives the answer a bitter taste of hidden advertising.

The offending questions:

Some of them don't mention Bluemix specifically in the title, but all of them are tagged with and especially the profile of James Thomas where all of his 5 questions are self-answered ones, this makes 50% of his 10 answers self-answered questions related to .

Edit: My proposal is that questions (only in case of self-answering Q/A) should be having a disclaimer added. I don't have an issue with self-answering itself (as stated above) and also not if the developers of a framework answer to other users. But, for example, most Microsoft employees here on SO have a "- MSFT" addition to their name. This way such things get more obvious.

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    Self answering isn't forbidden and I don't see any actual promotion of their product (You should totally drop that and use BlueMix, now also in Red!!). There is this other meta post that notices that they redirected some support to SO. The self answering of relevant frequent asked questions seems to be a way to get that bluemix tag going. – rene Feb 20 '16 at 0:17
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    Those Q&A seem just fine to me if they weren't self-answered -- which means they're just fine even if they are self-answered. The rules don't change. There's no promotion going on, so no reason to object on those grounds (again, self-answered or not, the rules about promotion are the same). You are free to vote as you like if you feel the questions are so trivial as to not be useful to others, as with any question, self-answered or not. – Jeffrey Bosboom Feb 20 '16 at 1:04
  • @rene: Self-answering isn't the actual issue. it's the self-answering + poster working for the product related to the Q/A. All of the linked users work for IBM or IBM's Bluemix subdivision – Tseng Feb 20 '16 at 1:43
  • They could just be answering frequently asked questions. What seems a little weird is if you look at the posting time the answer is almost directly after the question in the couple of the examples above I looked at. Again they could be using this as a way to answer FAQ's but it seems a little more blatant when the answer comes from the same person seconds after the question. If this is a way of answering FAQ's thats pretty clever but if not shame on them. – Careful Now Feb 20 '16 at 1:49
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    @Daniel Nothing clever about it. If you already know the answer, it makes sense to post it at the same time as the question. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 20 '16 at 3:21
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    @Daniel To share knowledge about a programming problem that could be useful to others. This is pretty common on SO (it's actually encouraged); it's not just IBM. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 20 '16 at 3:37
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    @Tseng Are the questions and answers useful and of high quality? Then I don't care who wrote them. Disclosing your affiliation is important if you're recommending a product, which is not the case here. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 20 '16 at 3:40
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    @Tseng Yep, they have links to relevant documentation. If they were linking to advertisements that would be a different story. Yes, I looked at the linked posts and they all look fine to me. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 20 '16 at 14:16
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    If they are helpful, benefitting their company is not a problem. – PyRulez Feb 20 '16 at 20:12
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    They do have a disclaimer on their profile, so I don't really see the matter here. – Bakuriu Feb 20 '16 at 20:34
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    @Tseng, such disclaimers in questions would suck. They're nothing, but pollution, just like "thank you", "please help", signatures etc. – Cristian Ciupitu Feb 20 '16 at 21:35
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    @Tseng issue has no more relevance than asking everyone to qualify their credentials to answer any question. If both the questions and answers are valid why are you even worried about it? – charlietfl Feb 21 '16 at 0:01
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    @DanielDowd Just because I know the answer to a question in my area of expertise doesn't mean the answer is obvious to everyone else. Whether I have an affiliation with a specific organization or not is irrelevant. The only time affiliation needs to be disclosed is when it comes to promoting something (hai guyz, this library I totally wrote will totally solve your problem). – cimmanon Feb 22 '16 at 17:07
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    When I see questions that state "when I try to create a container, I get this error", and the OP isn't actually getting that error but is instead an employee posting an FAQ and already has an answer in mind, it's a bit dishonest. It would be better if they wrote in a more passive voice and identified it up front as an FAQ. – Mark Plotnick Feb 22 '16 at 17:20
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    @MarkPlotnick I strongly disagree that it's dishonest. This is a Q & A site; the expected format is a question followed by one or more answers, not a hypothetical scenario followed by one or more hypothetical answers with additional crap like disclaimers. The passive voice would just add unnecessary fluff: "If one were to try to create a container, one might get this error. How could one resolve it?" – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 22 '16 at 17:35
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It seems to me that folks working at IBM on Bluemix are probably in the best position to offer quality answers to questions in that area.

Another way of looking at this:

I am a Python core-developer, and the main author of the Enum module that landed in Python 3.4 (as well as the backport), but I do not mention this when answering questions about Enum nor Python because that would be attempting to use my authority/position to influence the votes, and voting should be on the quality of the answer, not the identity of the answerer.

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    because that would be attempting to use my authority/position to influence the votes => I think this is the critical point. When introducing a technology/library/whatever in an answer, it is courteous to cite your relationship to it (author, contributor, ...) because you are likely biased. On the other hand, when said technology/library is introduced by the OP, then the same disclaimer risks turning into a "certified exact" and unduly influence the attitude of readers. – Matthieu M. Feb 21 '16 at 16:40
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    @MatthieuM. yes, but it seems that this question is about the case where you are the OP. – David Z Feb 22 '16 at 15:12
  • @DavidZ: My answer is for both cases, as I have also answered my own questions. – Ethan Furman Feb 22 '16 at 15:53
  • @DavidZ: I don't think being the OP brings anything special; if the OP asks for a specific technology, then the future readers will come if they use said technology already, thus there's no "subversion". – Matthieu M. Feb 22 '16 at 17:05
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As an IBMer I can tell you that there were many people (inside IBM) complaining that we all come to Stack Overflow to find answers about everything but there was none or little information about Bluemix. It was really confusing because we couldn't find information anywhere (apart from long self-learn private 10 hour tutorials). Hence, they encouraged the people involved to do this kind of thing so that it was easier for everyone to know how to deal with it. We don't use anything like a FAQ page to look for the answers to questions that come up, we're too used to google things :)

Edit: It's probably happening because the people involved are tired of being asked the same questions everyday.

Answering to the comment under this answer: The user they're talking about also has this in his profile: "views and opinions are my own, and may not represent those of IBM". We have to be extremely careful about what we say, they tell us tirelessly not to raise conflicts when we are publicly saying that we are from IBM (I guess other companies do the same). We cannot state things that might mislead people to think that's the company stance on the discussion (even like in Twitter personal pages). I don't think having a visible tag would help this practise, since someone could come and say that IBM is giving an answer that is not working or something similar.

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    Interesting. Can you give us any clues on IBM stance on company tags in the name? For example "Brian Gleeson - IBM": stackoverflow.com/users/1463958/brian-gleeson-ibm as you can see, most of his answers are around the Xpages topic, which makes sense since that's the team he's on and obviously has the most experience with. It's cool that the developers come and give direct answers (or self-answers for that case), I'd just like a more visible indication on it, that hidden somewhere behind the users profile link – Tseng Feb 21 '16 at 9:28
  • @Tseng I editted my answer – randombee Feb 21 '16 at 11:04
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First of all I wish we had more users that are doing profound Q&A (both at once posts) on Stackoverflow and the niche-sites.

Secondly, I've been through the Q&A you referenced and I do not share the opinion that this is hidden advertising with a bitter taste.

However I do think that we need more disclaimers and I find it a relief that this gets more and more traction on meta at least.

DISCLAIMER: MY FEELINGS, OPINIONS AND EXPRESSIONS ARE MY OWN, NOT REPRESENTING THE COMPANY I WORK FOR OR HAVE WORKED FOR IN THE PAST - EVEN I DO NOT DISCLOSE THOSE COMPANY NAMES IN MY PROFILE. THIS ANSWER DOES NOT CONTAIN ANY FACTS. IF YOU READ SOMETHING THAT SOUNDS LIKE A FACT TO YOU, YOU HAVE TO TREAT IT AS A THOUGHT-OF-FACT WHICH HAS BEEN FABRICATED FOR THE ANSWER ALONE AS AN ARTIFICIAL STYLISTIC MATTER. ABSOLUTELY NO WARANTY TO THE EXTEND OF LAW. IF YOU DON'T LIKE THE ANSWER, BEFORE DOWNVOTING, PLEASE CONSIDER TO UPVOTE IT INSTEAD BECAUSE I HAVE WRITTEN IN MY DISCLAIMER THAT YOU MIGHT NOT HAVE THE SAME OPINION AND THEREFORE AS THIS WAS WRITTEN AND IT'S YOUR OPINION AS WELL, IT DESERVES AN UPVOTE. SAME FOR UPVOTES, IF YOU WOULD TEND TO UPVOTE, PLEASE THINK TWICE BECAUSE OF THIS DISCLAIMER BECAUSE IT MIGHT ALSO REPRESENT OPINIONS THAT YOU DISLIKE, SO YOU MIGHT NEED TO CONSIDER DOWNVOTING INSTEAD OF UPVOTING. HOWEVER, IN NO CASE YOU SHOULD FEEL DIRECTED IN OR AGAINST YOUR FAVOR OF VOTING BY THIS DISCLAIMER. ALL ADVERTISEMENT - HIDDEN OR NOT - IS INTENDEND AND MADE PUBLIC BY THIS DISCLAIMER. ALL PROMOTION OF OPIONIONS AND EXPRESSIONS IS FULLY INTENDED AND MADE TRANSPARENT BY THIS DISCLAIMER.

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    ☑️ I have read and agree to the disclaimer – BoltClock Feb 21 '16 at 17:22
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    full ack and just seeing that the disclaimer finally brings together opinions and onions. – hakre Feb 21 '16 at 17:26
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    E_TOO_MUCH_CAPS – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Feb 22 '16 at 15:38
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I'm of two minds of this as I've been working on some of it lately (and I don't work for IBM).

It's not advertising: A lot of Bluemix/Watson is new (within the last 3-6 months), and some of it isn't documented well. I'd rather have info out there now than waiting 6 months for a technical writer at IBM document it - even if the information is provided by a dev at IBM working on it.

It's advertising: There is currently online discussion over how successful Bluemix and Watson Services are. Being a little cynical it's understandable how posts from IBM staff could be seen as promotion in that respect.

I don't think it's advertising based on the questions and answers here.

It wouldn't be the first time a company has made a policy of officially going to SO for help and I doubt it'll be the last.

  • I really hope it's not done for advertising the product. If it is like that, then even we (IBMers) are clueless about this kind of practises. It's probably happening because the people involved are tired of getting people asking the same questions to them everyday. – randombee Feb 21 '16 at 1:54
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    I don't see how a rational author or reader takes these as promotional, based on their content. Don't you think your criteria above is highly unusual? – covener Feb 21 '16 at 1:59
  • I personally don't think it's advertising based on the current questions and answers. I've corrected my answer to reflect this. – Damien Dennehy Feb 21 '16 at 3:31

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