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I asked a question about unit testing in iOS. And @RichTolley gave me a good answer. It can be seen that it took time to make up an answer like that. It contains a good instruction, an explanation, and some useful links as well.

However then I noticed, that I made a mistake, which radically changes the question (originally I was asking about using a separate test target, but then realized, that I wanted to ask about a separate test host, while a separate test target is not an issue for me). So I updated the question.

But then I thought: what about the answer I was given? It took time and effort to compose it, and it really did answer the original question. It doesn't seem right to me that my edit of the question simply invalidated at least half of it.

So I thought: wouldn't it be better to revert the question to its original state (or even make it fit the answer a little better, since I was confused, while writing the original question) and ask another question about the separate test host? But I don't know whether it is a right thing to do from the point of view of the SO community, so I'm here for an advice: what should I do?

  1. Leave the edited question as it is, leaving it up to the author of the answer to update it accordingly (doesn't seem very right to me).
  2. Revert the question and ask another one.
  3. Delete the question (wow!).

marked as duplicate by JAL, HaveNoDisplayName, approxiblue, Michał Perłakowski, Cody Gray Feb 20 '16 at 6:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Pretty sure this has been asked before, but to sum it up until a dupe is found: Revert the question and ask a new one. Since you've already gotten a good answer, you don't want to invalidate it! That could lead to downvotes on the answer, which is definitely not what we want for good answers. Your original question could also help someone down the road, who is looking for a question about separate test targets. – Kendra Feb 19 '16 at 21:37
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    About 99% of the questions are wrong. And 50% of the answers are right, give or take. Don't mess up somebody's answer, another programmer might well make the same mistake, google your question and find the answer. Your participation in the grand scheme here is to get it wrong :) Thanks for the help. – Hans Passant Feb 19 '16 at 22:22
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Sometimes these types of things are just left, so at least you realized there is a discrepancy.

The best path forward here is #2.

That is because your real question is radically different so it should be asked separately. Furthermore, your current question garnered an appropriate answer so it may as well be left in that state as both a courtesy to the answerer, and perhaps so that others who thought it was that may see the same answer you saw and have some insight.

  • Thank you! Done :) P.S. Can't accept your answer another 4 minutes... – FreeNickname Feb 19 '16 at 21:44
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    @FreeNickname - I am not too worried about checkmark timing :) Posts should be written to stand the test of time and that is the general approach I try to keep in mind with regards to contributions. – Travis J Feb 19 '16 at 21:48
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    I agree with you and I like the way you say it :) I just thought that it would be strange that I thanked you, followed your advice but didn't accept your answer, hence my comment) – FreeNickname Feb 19 '16 at 21:52

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