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In answering questions on Stack Overflow, I have often wanted to embed a link that points to documentation offsite, or onsite to specific answers from other questions. And on those other pages, I sometimes want to reference a specific API call that is waaaay down a page on an API documentation page.

Right now, I typically see folks just paste the URL for the page, and let the user figure out the rest, scrolling and scrolling until they (hopefully) find the right reference. Another example occurs when referring from one question to another question's answer; I have often found one particular answer is more accurate/appropriate than others and it is not always the selected answer. It would be cool again to point directly to that answer.

I use something called helptile.com to do this, but right now it requires Chrome and it is an extension you must install to your browser. I love it for lots of things, actually. However, since not everyone has it or they might be loath to install an extension, I am wondering if there is another solution that performs similar function?

It seems like it would be a great benefit to Stack Overflow to have something like that.

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    For SO answers, you can click the "Share" link by an answer. That will give you a link that should auto-scroll to that answer. If the offsite stuff has good anchor tags, you can leverage those as well. – Becuzz Feb 18 '16 at 15:58
  • Very cool, I had not noticed that! – darrylivan Feb 18 '16 at 15:58
  • @ryanyuyu: How is that "javascript routing", instead of a normal anchor? – Deduplicator Feb 18 '16 at 16:15
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    @Deduplicator that is me just being dumb. Yes it's just an anchor. Most well-designed pages provide them. And really nice pages give you a quick way to append that portion the end of the url. – ryanyuyu Feb 18 '16 at 16:17
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In answering questions on Stack Overflow, I have often wanted to embed a link that points to documentation offsite, or onsite to specific answers from other questions. And on those other pages, I sometimes want to reference a specific API call that is waaaay down a page on an API documentation page.

Simple. Include a link to the documentation and an excerpt of the relevant information from that page. Use a blockquote to quote the excerpt. That way, all of the relevant information is available in your answer, even if the link goes dead (or, as in the perennial case of MSDN, the entire website gets rejiggered in a couple of months, breaking all of the links). If someone wants to see the information in its full context, they can click the link. If they need help finding it, then their browser's search function can come to the rescue.

As has already been pointed out, for answers to questions on Stack Overflow, you can use the "share" link to get a slug that links directly to a specific post. It is worth pointing out that it does include a unique identifier at the end for the user who clicked the "share" link. You can remove that if you want. For example:

http://meta.stackoverflow.com/q/317160/366904
                                       ^^^^^^ (identifies my user account, optional)

I use something called helptile.com to do this, but right now it requires Chrome and it is an extension you must install to your browser. I love it for lots of things, actually. However, since not everyone has it or they might be loath to install an extension

Please don't. Oh boy am I one of those people. I don't know what that is, am not planning on installing it, and don't want answers on this site to be dependent upon some third-party extension. I am slowly getting Chrome out of my life as the design team has shown its true colors over the years. Frankly, if I saw something like that in an answer, I would edit it out. It falls into the same category as obfuscated URLs.

Right now, I typically see folks just paste the URL for the page, and let the user figure out the rest, scrolling and scrolling until they (hopefully) find the right reference.

I think quoting the relevant bits will solve this problem. But even if it doesn't, is this really that big of a problem? I mean, sure, if you just dump someone a link without context, it's no different than RTFM, and that's not okay. But if you explain the solution to their problem, and then provide a link to the documentation, anyone who is willing to expend a little effort should be able to find the reference and figure it out from there. You cannot help people who are unwilling to help themselves.

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