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Is there no discussion or recourse for an answer deleted by a moderator?

One of my answers was deleted because "... [it] seems to simply repeat the information given in an existing answer."

Checking the help centre link, this does not appear to be a legitimate reason to delete an answer. The closest reason for the deletion would be exact duplicates of other answers however I don't believe my answer satisfies that criteria.

My deleted answer was for this question: How do I enumerate through a JObject? and is as follows: enter image description here

Until my answer, nobody identified JProperty as the class which enumerates JObject; all other answers use var.

What is the best way to address this?

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    Whoops... sorry about that. Brad's explained the situation, but I thought I'd add a "sorry", seeing as I was the moderator that dropped the ball on this one! – Matt Feb 17 '16 at 20:46
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    You really screwed up. You came in here and asked a rational, calm, fairly worded question. What you should have done is come in here and started ranting about nazi modraters who has guns in there hands who are false gods. Now all my popcorn is going to go to waste. Thanks. – user1228 Feb 17 '16 at 20:54
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    @Will we wait for the leave comment on down vote post then... keep the popcorn.... – rene Feb 17 '16 at 21:01
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    The moderators are false gods? I only just finished building my shrine:( – Martin James Feb 17 '16 at 21:17
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    Hey @Will some users don't understand your humor and take offense. I'll grab your popcorn and see you at the upcoming meta post ... – rene Feb 17 '16 at 21:59
  • Daniel, do what you can to improve your answers in general so they give insight and context to those that follow. It may seem obvious to he who posts, but new eyes are just learning these things. As Travis says below, take that extra step. Some of us are moving through New Answers to Old Questions in 10k Tools. In my case, I wasn't even looking at the other answers on the question. I was just trying to keep your answer alive from a queue of reviewers that could flag it for removal. – Drew Feb 18 '16 at 1:41
  • Well, instead of posting a whole new answer you could simply have commented the existing answer or edit it. – Bakuriu Feb 18 '16 at 12:36
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Because normal users can't overturn a moderator's deletion vote, you basically have two ways to contest this: open a Meta question about it (as you have) or use a custom flag.

In most cases, I recommend using a custom flag and explaining why you feel the deletion was incorrect and why the answer should be undeleted. Indicating that the original answer wasn't expressed in terms of JProperty, and that's what this contributes, would most likely be enough to get one of us to undelete it. I've done that here.

The answer was flagged by another user as being a late copy of the accepted answer, and they asked us to delete it, which is what triggered the moderator action. It's easy to miss the single-word difference in the code, so I can see how this happened.

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    I was requesting a few words from Daniel as opposed to a code dump without any assistance otherwise. Nothing to do with any other answers. – Drew Feb 17 '16 at 20:59
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    @Drew - To be clear, I wasn't referring to your comment. There was a flag on this answer by another user that asked for it to be deleted. That's what I was talking about. – Brad Larson Feb 17 '16 at 21:14
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    Is that really a difference though? Someone can take a whole snippet, change just one var to an explicit variable type, and then it is classified as a different piece of code? Especially give the time difference and popularity of the question, this hardly seems significant. I do not feel that answer adds anything to the post, and I also feel it should be deleted as a result of content duplicate. While you as a moderator may feel it is not warranted for deletion which is perfectly fine, as a member of the community my vote is for deletion; and I have voted already as I hope others will as well. – Travis J Feb 17 '16 at 22:21
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    @Travis J - As the accepted answer states, the var resolves to KeyValuePair<string, JToken> not JProperty. The second answer casts the KeyValuePair<string, JToken> to a JProperty. My answer is different because i'm enumerating via JProperty. – Daniel Feb 17 '16 at 22:42
  • @TravisJ - If my answer was to change var to KeyValuePair<string, JToken>, I would agree with your reasoning. – Daniel Feb 17 '16 at 22:49
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    @DanielK So basically you are wrong. But let's delve deeper! The main issue with copying code and making inference from other comments is that it usually fails. See the fail section of your code breaking here: dotnetfiddle.net/hfUPQg . Note the error: Compilation error (line 26, col 3): Cannot convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<string,Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JToken>' to 'Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JProperty'. This is the problem with code only answers in general, and also with small snippets in this exact scenario. Working examples with explanations make for solid answers. – Travis J Feb 17 '16 at 23:03
  • @TravisJ That is strange. I did not copy code and make inferences on what could work. I wrote this code in one of my projects. Let me dig up my code and get back to you on this. – Daniel Feb 17 '16 at 23:08
  • @TravisJ - If a JObject is cast to a JToken, you can enumerate it with JProperty dotnetfiddle.net/cYXvep . I've updated the answer to make this clear. – Daniel Feb 17 '16 at 23:26
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    @DanielK - Okay, well that is at least some level of distinction now. Is there any way you could add in to the answer an explanation of why you would want to do that, the benefits of that approach, and the example you just linked here? That would go a long way to distinguish your answer from the others. – Travis J Feb 18 '16 at 0:02

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