-7

Would using fake "Honeypot" tags to warn/inform the user when added improve question quality?

As an example of how I see this working: create an tag (and others) available when asking a new question. This "Tag" would not exist truly exist (no tag pages, question lists, tag wiki, or anything else), but it would have a tag description and plus some fake numbers. It would only be available for adding to new questions, perhaps only for low-rep or new users. They could behave like review audits really.

For new users, such tags would look pretty real, and when a user adds a fake tag like or , it can trigger a message or a page explaining what to keep in mind when asking questions, or why should not be asked, and so on for other such tags.

If someone adds the tag to their question, the next confirmation page (which all new users get after asking a question, IIRC) could show something like this:

The question you are asking seems to be Primarily opinion based. Such questions should not be asked on Stack Overflow, and your question may be downvoted, closed or deleted.

(...)

I think that doing something like this would filter out at least some off-topic questions before they're even posted, and this would raise question quality. Data collected through this could also be used to improve automated decisions on what goes into triage and other review queues.

These "fake" tags, would also be removed from the question before being posted, obviously.

My questions:

  • Is this a good idea, and would it have any effect?

  • What downsides would there be, and would the benefits outweigh the downsides?

  • Would SE implement something like this?

  • Your title says "Proposal" but you have marked this as a discussion. So is it just a discussion at this point or do you actually want to propose this feature? – ryanyuyu Feb 16 '16 at 19:43
  • 14
    By providing these tags as suggestions, we're basically tricking users into adding them only to throw it back in their face and block their question, based on tags we suggested to them. The process of asking a question is already hugely confusing for non-native English speakers, throwing fake tags that look (to the uninitiated) like good tags is just mean. – meagar Feb 16 '16 at 19:51
  • @meagar, why should they look like? They can be striked or something like that. Also, what about adding message without suggesting? So a user tries to create blacklisted tag and sees the message why this concrete tag is bad. – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 19:54
  • @ryanyuyu, Just a discussion at this point. Was thinking that it could be turned into a feature request if people liked the idea. – JonasCz - Reinstate Monica Feb 16 '16 at 20:09
  • 3
    First honeypot tag: seo. Autoban anybody using it. – Ripped Off Feb 16 '16 at 20:19
  • 1
    @ryanyuyu, Thanks for the edits ! It's much better the way you've expressed it. – JonasCz - Reinstate Monica Feb 16 '16 at 21:04
17

I dislike this idea.

New users very well might tag their question correctly if these tags didn't exist. Not only that, but you might make them think that these types of questions are encouraged, because they have no way of attributing the tag they added with the warning they got. It's essentially entrapment.

By automatically removing the tags they added, we also serve to confuse new users.

It's also been mentioned in the past that newer users frequently do not read all the warnings/advice/etc given in the question. The more we add, the less likely it is that they will read what is already there.

12

We trick new users who are already not familiar with the finer points of SO into choosing tags that aren't allowed. For once, it works! They see that message, go back and legitimately fix their post, then try to post again, and they fail because there's no indication that those tags aren't allowed, and they still want expert advice about their homework.

So we add a clear indication that those tags aren't allowed, at which point it becomes trivial to go back, remove the tag, and continue on without fixing the post.

The problem wasn't solved, it just had a new layer added to it because we think flashing "read the rules" just one more time will definitely fix the problem.

  • What if no suggestion for such tags, but tag-specific message in case when user tryes to create such tag? – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 20:18
  • 2
    @Qwertiy last sentence: "The problem wasn't solved, it just had a new layer added to it because we think flashing "read the rules" just one more time will definitely fix the problem." Aptly demonstrated. – davidism Feb 16 '16 at 20:26
  • "Read the rules" is not usefull. But "Homework questions are not welcome on this site. You can ask a specific question about your code written to make a homework, but you shouldn't ask to solve the task instead of you." is. – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 20:38
  • 2
    @Qwertiy "read the rules" is a placeholder for "read this specific rule", I just didn't want to enumerate an infinite set, and I doubt the developers do either. – davidism Feb 16 '16 at 20:39
  • When the tag becomes blacklisted there is a special topic on meta about removing this tag. Is it a problem to add a concrete message for this tag, what should be done to improve te question? – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 20:44
  • 1
    @Qwertiy based on my answer and subsequent responses, is my position on this matter still unclear to you? It seems like you're not really taking in what I'm saying, thus demonstrating what I'm saying. – davidism Feb 16 '16 at 20:45
  • People are more welcome to read one sentence in specific case than one page of rules before posting anything. – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 20:47
  • 3
    @Qwertiy based on my answer and subsequent responses, is my position on this matter still unclear to you? It seems like you're not really taking in what I'm saying, thus demonstrating what I'm saying. – davidism Feb 16 '16 at 20:48
  • discussions are made to discuss, aren't they? – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 20:49
  • 2
    @davidism if you said that just one more time, and maybe [flash]highlight it in some way[/flash]? – Robert Grant Feb 16 '16 at 20:49
4

To what end?

There are enough deterrents in place as it is.

You need 15 before you can vote up, 20 rep before you can chat, 50 before you can comment, and 125 before you can vote anything down.

As it is, I think anyone tagging their posts like that will be dealt with as it is, but there are numerous ways it could come back and bite. It's not going to stop the takers, but it will frustrate anyone who puts in a tag that might set off alarms, especially those who's native language is not English and may turn out having an attempt to be polite getting them in trouble.

This is already about the most tightly controlled site there is. You'd be going past the point of diminishing returns for this.

-8

If I understand right, seems like a good idea.

There already is a blacklist of tags, which can't be used. I think, it would be nice to add a description for them and show it when user tries to use such tag.

For example for we can prepare a message

Homework questions are not welcome on this site. You can ask a specific question about your code written to make a homework, but you shouldn't ask to solve the task instead of you.

The good part of idea is that we can make specific messages why some tags shouldn't be used and what should be done is case if the asker is in suspicious area.

The problem is the misunderstanding that this would create. Yes, homework questions are allowed, but they have to meet the same standards that a non-homework question has.

If the user tryes to add this tag it's highly probable that his question doesn't meet the standards. If he sees standard message, he just removes the tag and posts a bad question. Question gets into closing queue and some people have to check it.

If user reads specific message telling what he should do, some of the users will understand that they are doing something wrong. If they improve the question or just don't publish the question, it'll reduce review load.

I don't see big drawbacks of replasing standatd messages by tag-specific ones.

There's also the matter of one actually reading the warning, which Davidism already aptly goes over.

It can be soleved by some way.

  • In review queue you can't confirm post before some time. As I understand, it's to prevent clicking the button without looking the post. Here same way is possible - lock the page for 10 seconds (or some other time) to force user to read.

  • Reformulate the message in such way, that blacklisted tag is not specially marked there. Question usually has more than one tag, so user have to read and understand the message (or just gess which tag is denied).

    For example:

    SO is not intended for solving school tasks instead of you. You have to do them youself to study. But you can ask a question if it is about your solution wich is added into the question.

    Also you have to remove tag related to the description above.

  • 5
    No one has a problem with a homework question that is well-formed and can be reasonably answered. The tag was explicitly blacklisted since it did nothing to describe the actual problem being asked. – Makoto Feb 16 '16 at 22:55
  • @Makoto, how is your comment related to idea of providing specific messages for each blacklisted tag? It should stay blacklisted, but if user tryes to create it, he gets corresponfing message instead of standart "The 'homework' tag is not allowed." It would help to prevent posting of a bad questions. At least from users who read the alerts. – Qwertiy Feb 16 '16 at 23:45
  • The problem is the misunderstanding that this would create. Yes, homework questions are allowed, but they have to meet the same standards that a non-homework question has. There's also the matter of one actually reading the warning, which Davidism already aptly goes over. – Makoto Feb 16 '16 at 23:46
  • @Makoto, updated the answer. – Qwertiy Feb 17 '16 at 0:06

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .