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This question is similar, but it is not a duplicate, as it has no suitable reasons or answers.

When I was trying to edit a post, I saw an attention warning saying: Some of my previous edits were rejected and I should review my recently-rejected edits before continuing:

Warning

After that I reviewed all my edits and among them I found that around eight of nine were rejected by Community due to a conflict with a subsequent edit:

Rejection

My Questions are:

  1. I think this is not my fault. Why is it counted and shown as rejected reviews in my profile?
  2. Will Stack Overflow ban me from reviewing in future when the number of such rejections increases?
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    If 8 of 9 were rejected by conflict, focus on the one that wasn't. You won't be automatically banned for your edits being rejected due to a conflict with a subsequent edit. – TZHX Feb 7 '16 at 13:04
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    Although, if you do have a high percentage rejected because of conflicts with future edits, for your own feedback, you might want to wonder why so many of yours conflict with others. – corsiKa Feb 8 '16 at 20:45
  • @corsiKa The same happened to me today. I took about 30 minutes to edit the question and this edit was approved already. But later the edit got rejected because of a subsequent edit. This is a little frustrating because I even created a screenshot of the described problem and added it to the question. So the consequence of this is: don't invest too much time to edit, because it's more likely to get rejected because another user is faster? – ventiseis Mar 28 '16 at 18:02
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    @ventiseis Your situation is an unfortunate side effect of a good but imperfect system. If that was happening often then I would say you need to look at changing the mechanics of how you do edits. Of course, once you have 2,000 rep, it doesn't matter anyway - you can edit at will and this all becomes moot (for you). – corsiKa Mar 28 '16 at 19:27
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Edits that were rejected because of an edit conflict don't count towards the ban nor towards the warning:

Until recently, the edit-ban system completely ignored rejections by Community; since edit conflicts could trigger such rejections, using those made it extremely likely that folks editing new posts would be banned for no fault of their own.

This presented a problem for implementing warnings, however: the warning criteria has to be evaluated every time someone opens the editor, and pulling in the data needed to exclude Community's rejections made that unacceptably slow. This actually ended up blocking implementation of the very-popular warning feature for a long time, but eventually we got around it by recording the reason for the rejection with the edit itself and simply excluding edits rejected for that reason.

That change was followed by a revamp for how the "Improve" feature worked for rejections. Now instead of rejecting edits while applying them to the post anyway, it completely discards the edit in favor of one the reviewer submits themselves - a behavior much closer to that of edit conflicts, but with the notable difference that this rejection is intentional on the part of the editor. Given this distinction (and the fact that we can now trivially differentiate between the two scenarios), it made sense to have these rejections count towards warnings and bans, while still excluding the unintended "conflict" rejections.

So, if you have a warning, it wasn't because of an edit conflict, but because another edit of yours was explicitly rejected by reviewers.

  • 10
    Note: A single rejected edit is enough to bring up the warning. – Nathan Tuggy Feb 7 '16 at 15:17
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    I must be really tired right now - read this all, a single time, and understood nothing. – natario Feb 7 '16 at 15:18
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    @mvai yeah, Shog can cause that impression. – Braiam Feb 7 '16 at 15:19
  • He surely does! – natario Feb 7 '16 at 15:20
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    @mvai But with Shog9's avatar it always seems so reassuring, whatever it says. Now, with Braiam's avatar instead, ..... ;) – Andras Deak Feb 7 '16 at 23:19
  • So, I am not sure if that rejected edit was correct. Admittedly, it could have been a better edit: remove the entire "Thank you" clause, as well as the "I could not solve this problem" (which is redundant). And I guess the link description might be wrong. However, vard's later edit is an example of a good edit on the question. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 8 '16 at 14:26
  • That edit should've been approved - and I'm surprise Vard didn't make a similar change. I agree that other changes would've been nice, but that edit ought to have been accepted by our current edit standards. – Joe Feb 9 '16 at 20:28
  • @Joe I'm not sure which edit you are talking about... – Braiam Feb 9 '16 at 20:30
  • @Braiam The OP's edit that you linked to. – Joe Feb 9 '16 at 20:30

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