129

Stack Overflow is about answers:

answers -- truly brilliant, amazing, correct answers -- are as rare as pearls. Thus, questions are merely the sand that produces the pearl.

The most brilliant answers don't necessarily help the asker, but will at least teach OP and later visitors something:

I attempt to answer questions in a way that helps other people who are reading the question, not [the OP].

When I am in the mood for writing an answer, I like it to first explain why the OP is encountering the problem they are, then offer some alternatives, and finally present some trivial code that may or may not solve that problem for some specific instantiations of said problem.

Most questions however do not trigger this response of either me, nor other people willing to write such answers. Most questions boil down to a lack of experience in debugging and rubberducking. Indeed, most questions are actually a combination of multiple problems higher up in the stack (no, reading "What is a NullReferenceException" isn't going to solve the problem that your query returns no records), or a lack in understanding spouting the typical XY problem question. This actually makes most questions "Too Localized", one of the reasons that close reason was removed.

But you can't blame people for not knowing something, and you can't close their questions for that.

What you can blame people for, and what I'm trying to aim for in this question, is posting poor-quality answers to ditto questions.

Do you really help the OP and the programming community in general by dumping fixed code without explanations? No search terms or links for them to learn more? The umpteenth version of an answer that is on the site hundreds of times already? Posting from your go-to cargo cult library of "useful snippets", without actually understanding what that code does?

What I'm trying to ask here of you, the answerers that make this site useful:

  • Do not guess. If you don't understand the problem, ask for clarification using comments on the question. Don't post an answer. If the problem description is unclear or incomplete, downvote and closevote accordingly.
  • Search, then answer. Really, most basic questions have already been asked and answered perfectly. No need to spread out knowledge over multiple answers. This is an actual problem. Google is already preferring other sites over Stack Overflow, which wouldn't surprise me to be caused by the massive duplication of oh-so-common questions and answers. Search for duplicates, and vote to close accordingly.
  • Explain and link. If the code in your answer refers to certain principles, explain them. When you know those principles to be covered in other questions, link to them. The OP and later visitors can then visit those links, or search on the mentioned terms.
  • Edit the question. There's always something to improve in a question (I dare you, @Peter Mortensen), especially when it's been asked a while ago. Cut the cruft, make it more broadly applicable. Remove irrelevant code.
  • Downvote. Help answerers earn that sweet Peer Pressure badge. When an answer is incorrect, contains outright incorrect statements or consists solely of a code dump that doesn't even attempt to address the OP's problem, downvote. It's not useful content for the OP or later readers.
  • Make more canonical Q&As. This way you won't have to repeat yourself or others, but can simply link to canonical pages that perfectly explain what an ORM, DTO and other TLAs mean and can do for you.

So, what's my question, you ask? I don't know. Maybe this: do you agree? And if so, how can we point out to current and future answerers what really matters in an answer they post?

  • 16
    It's not that I disagree with your sentiment - I really do feel that people should be focused more on the quality of their answers more than the amount of answers they give. It's just...this has been rehashed so many times before, and the whole "rep whore" stigma has left a bitter taste in my mouth. It's like it's the new "accept rate" with which we instantly judge users by. – Makoto Feb 3 '16 at 20:40
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    The simple reality is that vastly more people actively encourage posting this kind of crap, so there really isn't much of anything that you can do. If you tell people to actually downvote crap and encourage the people posting good answers, they're not even going to read those messages, and if for some reason they do, they won't care, and continue upvoting the people posting code only answers to someone else's homework assignment dump because, "the code works, so of course I'm supposed to upvote it." You could go create a new site, and keep the crap out, at least until you flop or grow. – Servy Feb 3 '16 at 20:47
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    @CodeCaster: The people that do care about the quality of questions, answers, and edits on the site are generally people that participate on Meta. In effect, you're preaching to the choir. – Makoto Feb 3 '16 at 20:50
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    "you can't blame people for not knowing something, and you can't close their questions for that" Well, that or we could ignore the opinion of one self-contradictory moderator and do the right thing instead. – Josh Caswell Feb 3 '16 at 20:50
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    @JoshCaswell I'd much rather just see an actual close reason be created (or an existing one edited) such that there would actually be a close reason that would actually apply to such questions, rather than closing questions for a reason that doesn't actually apply. – Servy Feb 3 '16 at 20:53
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    I'll up vote after Peter fixed your post... – rene Feb 3 '16 at 21:27
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    The number of answers containing "try this" is twice as large as "use this". It seems a lot of answerers are not too confident. I usually try to not start with "try ..." Maybe the phrase "try this" should show one of the Red Popup warnings. – usr2564301 Feb 3 '16 at 22:11
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    This question is based on the assumption that it is still useful or necessary to post elaborate answers. It is just isn't. The run of the mill question today just doesn't require that kind of answer. They don't require an expert either. Top rated answerers today are the people that dust these off at a high rate, dozens per day. You can still invest time and energy in such an answer, nobody will stop you. Given your stance, and mine, I recommend you do. It is the only way you'll still enjoy spending your free time at SO. – Hans Passant Feb 3 '16 at 23:31
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    @TravisJ Your answer is in Hans' next sentences, "The run of the mill question today just doesn't require that kind of answer. They don't require an expert either." Simply put, the majority of new questions on SO are "gimme teh codes" or "how do I solve this very narrow and specific problem without applying my brain or using Google". There's a dearth of new high-quality questions that ask about in-depth things like compiler bugs or the implications of the choice of a specific algorithm in a specific language. – Ian Kemp Feb 4 '16 at 8:08
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    Well thanks for closing this. I know it contains a lot of words, but check the last sentence perhaps? Close-voting a discussion is not the way to point out your disagreement. – CodeCaster Feb 4 '16 at 8:26
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    I totally agree with this, and it would be in line with putting a time freeze before answers can be posted, this would be a good way to sort the wheat from the chaff. – Yvette Colomb Feb 4 '16 at 9:47
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    @amuse right, but if I had a solution, I'd post an answer or a feature request. I'm merely looking for input from other members. – CodeCaster Feb 4 '16 at 10:59
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    The whole text makes me bellow "YES! REVOLUTION!", except for this one statement: "But you can't blame people for not knowing something" - no? Well then I want the right to smack people in the head with a book. The most wonderful tool in the world that people refuse to use for their own benefit. – Gimby Feb 4 '16 at 12:33
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    @IanKemp: "There's a dearth of new high-quality questions that ask about in-depth things like compiler bugs or the implications of the choice of a specific algorithm in a specific language." You say that as though, in the past, there was a huge array of such questions just begging to be answered. The fact of the matter is, Stack Overflow has always has a majority of its questions be of the "give me teh codez". I was away from SO for 2 years, and from my perspective... it's no worse today than it was when I stopped posting in late 2013. – Nicol Bolas Feb 4 '16 at 14:54
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    @NicolBolas I joined Stack Overflow in 2009, when the site was still fairly new, and didn't perceive any quality problems until around 2012 when Jeff Atwood left. You might say this was because I've become more experienced and a better programmer in those 3 years, and/or because I started taking a more active role in the site (reviewing) around the same time... but I have a very clear memory of looking at the list of C# questions in those "early years" and seeing a bunch of high-quality questions with answers from guys like Jon Skeet. Today I look at the same list and it's just... bad. – Ian Kemp Feb 5 '16 at 8:38
44

This has been beaten to death on meta. I've posted like three or four questions saying the same thing, over the years. Nothing ever changes, and nothing ever will change. When it starts to really bother you, take a break for a while before the dark side starts gnawing at your soul. That's all you can do.

That is: do nothing.

(To be clear: I'm not blaming SE for not doing anything. I'm saying it's a fundamental societal problem and I've come to believe that we're stuck with it for as long as we're all human.)

  • 7
    "Bother" is too strong a word. I'll happily continue downvoting code dumps from both askers and answerers, no worries. – CodeCaster Feb 4 '16 at 22:53
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    But everything does change! Every problem has a corresponding solution—we just haven't found the one to this yet. – Anko Feb 4 '16 at 22:53
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    @Anko: Not every problem does have a tractible solution. It's a good thing, too, otherwise the hackers would have won long ago (see: public-key cryptography) and I doubt we'd even be having this conversation! – Lightness Races with Monica Feb 4 '16 at 23:11
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    So, if the problem are humans, why not just remove the problem? – Braiam Feb 4 '16 at 23:17
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    @Braiam: Trump's working on it. – Lightness Races with Monica Feb 4 '16 at 23:18
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    @Lightness what did you change your nick to? – CodeCaster Feb 4 '16 at 23:52
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    @Anko There is a solution. Unfortunately, it conflicts with Stack Exchange's goal of "make money". – Ian Kemp Feb 5 '16 at 8:44
  • @Braiam The problem is more specifically, stupid and/or lazy humans. – Ian Kemp Feb 5 '16 at 8:44
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    @CodeCaster: Inside joke ;p – Lightness Races with Monica Feb 5 '16 at 9:35
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    If only we could build a great big wall around the southern border of this site to keep the bad questions out. And make the askers pay for it. – Cody Gray Feb 5 '16 at 13:44
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    @CodyGray Clearly, the solution is to ban all questions until we can figure out what's going on. – James Brierley Feb 5 '16 at 14:11
20

I'm not a long time member or a high ranker by any means but so much of this rings true especially since I've just recently started Completing My Civic Duty by reducing the Triage queue by 20 questions per day. The amount of simply appalling stuff that appears in there is terrifying. And I'm not being big headed or thinking I'm sort of question asking god but it already seriously pains me to read through half the questions I see getting posted.

To me here are some of the issues that are causing some of the problems you are highlighting (in the same order as you've posted them):

  • Do not guess - The nature of some problems mean you will not know what the actual issue is until several things have been tried, hence asking someone to try something as a suggested answer seems a sensible way to do it as it indicates you will continue to help if the given answer doesn't work (hopefully by editing in further assistance (rather than blatting the original) so as to show all possible remedies to future readers).

    Also comments for clarification don't get me rep. Whilst I'm busy asking you to clear something up in the comments someone else is busy writing an answer using the information I am drawing from you to write the answer I am working towards. See also Fastest Gun in the West.

  • Search, then answer - But then I won't get my rep since I'm not the Fastest Gun in the West. To this end I think we should punish people for answering obvious dupes. Nothing crazy, just remove the rep they got for answering (perhaps this happens already).

  • Downvote - It costs rep to downvote and there are users with way more rep than me so why shouldn't they do it? Besides, if a question is that bad it'll get thrown on the trash heap anyway without it costing me anything.

  • Make more canonical Q&As - Because when a user asks 'How do I get the SUM of these 2 fields in SQL?' they are really likely to want to read your 10 page, 3 year in the making answer on The Minutiae of SUM in SQL.

So for a large part I think the issues are caused by a running theme, The (Perceived) Importance of Rep in Everything. As a new user I was the same, I wanted to be taken seriously on the site and I (mistakenly or not) believed having a low rep score worked against me. Giving quick, correct answers even if they were duplicates, even if they were 'here is the codez', gains that initial rep that new users who don't know any better strive for.

Now that I'm above the initial 400 or so lower bound that many new users never pass I'm comfortable with my score and love getting it higher through better methods.

But the way I see it unless we actively discourage the gains gained through poor answers the problem won't go away.

SO can't tell people not to do something but still reward them for doing it.

*Please note my rep whoring attitude is tongue in cheek. I like rep but I prefer giving good answers that have rep as a side effect (and we all know badges are more important than rep anyway).

  • 6
    "To this end I think we should punish people for answering obvious dupes. Nothing crazy, just remove the rep they got for answering (perhaps this happens already)." It doesn't. And it wouldn't actually punish anyone, because they'd still have the same amount of rep they had to start with ... plus a little street cred from their cool answer. You'd have to dock some rep. I wouldn't support that — not everyone knows a post is a dupe when they answer it, even if they've spent some time searching for a dupe target, on a hunch, first. – Lightness Races with Monica Feb 4 '16 at 23:20
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    Not sure why you're getting downvotes though. This all otherwise looks about right to me. – Lightness Races with Monica Feb 4 '16 at 23:21
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    1. If you can only guess what the problem is, don't pretend you can actually answer. Downvote, flag for closing, ask for clarifications. 2. Fact is that rep is earned and not ever revoked for dupes, due to insufficient downvoting/del-voting/close-voting and happy-go-lucky-upvoting. See next point. 3. Yes, it costs a tiny amount of rep, but if the post gets deleted, that's refunded. More downvoting makes that more likely, and if you hold back that makes it unlikely. 4. The canonical should be thorough, and if the asker doesn't want to learn, that's simply too bad for him. (..) – Deduplicator Feb 4 '16 at 23:26
  • (..) He won't ever become a productive member that way anyway. – Deduplicator Feb 4 '16 at 23:26
  • Punishing dupes one way or another has been proposed often, by various mechanisms. Awarding good behavior seems to be easier to build a consensus around than punishing controversial (or even sometimes outright bad) behavior, so my proposal was to award badges and/or rep for consistent dupe and close voting, but so far, I have not seen any of the many proposal towards this end receive any substantial traction. – tripleee Feb 5 '16 at 7:40
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    @PreferenceBean - "And it wouldn't actually punish anyone, because they'd still have the same amount of rep they had to start with..." - Exactly, they'd still have the same amount of rep but they'd have used their time to write an answer they are getting (in a rep sense) nothing for. That in itself is a punishment, albeit very lenient but intentionally so since as you said, not everyone knows a post is a dupe when they answer. – RyanfaeScotland Feb 5 '16 at 8:23
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    @Deduplicator - "If you can only guess what the problem is, don't pretend you can actually answer" - But EVERY answer you give on SO is a guess until confirmed otherwise. You can only ever believe you have the right answer for the question but before posting you can never be certain, even if you believe it 100%. Some questions don't deserve Dvote/Close but still have a degree of uncertainty about them. I reckon there is a level everyone has where they think if an answer is above N% probably right it is worth posting, for you it may be 100% for others 95%, others 2%. – RyanfaeScotland Feb 5 '16 at 8:29
  • @tripleee - "_ Awarding good behavior seems to be easier to build a consensus around than punishing controversial..._" - Why not both? :) Yup rewards for dupe closing sounds good. 'Improving SO 1 Dupe At A Time' – RyanfaeScotland Feb 5 '16 at 8:31
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    @Deduplicator - Thanks also for points 2 and 3, good to know more about how it works. Keep in mind though "a tiny amount of rep" is very relative. It would cost you 0.007% of your overall rep but it would cost me 0.372%, 53 times more! Quite a difference. And point 4 is sadly so, so true. – RyanfaeScotland Feb 5 '16 at 8:40
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    "EVERY answer you give on SO is a guess until confirmed otherwise" - oh no, it isn't. I'm not talking about whether your answer will help OP. If you're not sure on that, then you either lack experience or the question is unclear. In both cases you should not post an answer. For every answer I post, I'm pretty damn sure that it fixes the problem stated in the question. – CodeCaster Feb 5 '16 at 15:18
  • have a "popular question" badge (and some related badges) because one of my questions got lots of views... at the time, I needed an answer. I am altruistic, and glad it helped others, but if I didn't "need an answer now", I wouldn't have asked it.. Pretty sure this is true of the vast majority of questions here. We're software developers, not math professors ... stackoverflow.com/questions/334896/… – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 16:21
  • @CodeCaster - Pretty damn sure eh? So what's that, about 0.1% away from sure? ;-) Just read Yakk's answer on a (semi) related question about why we answer questions and it was pretty inspiring so dropping it in here as in may prompt people to answer better. meta.stackoverflow.com/a/315041/971299 – RyanfaeScotland Feb 5 '16 at 16:48
11

The underling principle of Stack Exchange is that of gamification. That you drive behaviour by awarding points.

It shouldn't be a surprise that people optimise for point scoring.

Writing an awesome answer to a difficult question is not a good way to do this. Because you probably score the same for a correct one liner response to a regex question.

Now, there are points of pride here, but certainly one of my higher scoring answers is very basic.

So you won't fix this problem until you address that. Until the scoring reflects "worthy" content, not just fast, correct and in a popular tag.

I don't know how, but maybe some bonus rep awards for a views to upvote ratio. (If 90% of the people who saw it, upvoted, it is probably unusually good)..

  • 2
    I like your ratio idea. What bothers me most though is when "new users" don't accept deeply thought "awesome" answers, and your answer doesn't get any attention because the newbie used a cliche title and bad formatting. – Aaron Gillion Feb 5 '16 at 13:54
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    @AaronGillion Crappy titles and bad formatting can and should be fixed by editing, and accepts don't really matter. What does suck is that awesome answers to obscure but interesting questions in low-traffic tags rarely get much attention. Even more so because hard questions take time to solve and good answers take time to write, so by the time the answer is posted, everybody has already moved on. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 5 '16 at 18:06
  • And if you stand to score more by improving the question, then that too is an incentive – Sobrique Feb 5 '16 at 19:23
  • I counter-intuitively suspect that your proposed views-to-upvotes ratio will, for positively-scored answers, actually be dramatically negatively correlated with answer quality. Why? Because most viewers on popular questions (which is where there's the most room for an answerer to truly shine and write something that makes the internet a better place) are random Googlers who don't have upvote powers, but most viewers of crap, low-view questions are established users who do have upvote powers. Your ratio will value people who answer crap fix-my-typo questions more than anyone else. – Mark Amery Feb 5 '16 at 21:38
  • Point I am trying to make is that rep for upvote drives the wrong behaviour. But yes, you may be right. Perhaps filter for upvote capability. Perhaps just have an anonymous (useful) button? – Sobrique Feb 5 '16 at 22:05
  • Of course the ratio would be taking into account only people who can actually vote. Does the system keep track of specific views with account? Is it even thinkable? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Feb 6 '16 at 3:52
  • @FélixGagnon-Grenier Yes, anonymous feedback is tracked. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 6 '16 at 4:10
3

I do not answer often, compared to the frequency of my questions. When I do, it is usually debug help I offer. Most of my questions as a new user here, was lacking a lot of understanding, and had a lot of wrong assumptions. Most of all, I had no idea of what the different relevant methods/techniques/terms etc was called. I still struggle with that issue every now and then.

The five first bullet points are things that I am aware of, and try to live up to. The sixth not so much. Yet, This is an important thing that I will do more in the future.

The accepted answer here claims that "This has been beaten to death on meta. I've posted like three or four questions saying the same thing, over the years. Nothing ever changes, and nothing ever will change". You might be right, but status quo is a lot better than deterioating. I for one learned something from this post, and intend to become even better when answering questions from now on. These types of questions (not questions?) at least helps to educate the ever growing number of users, and might be the reason why stackoverflow, although not perfect, is the definitely best Q&A-community around for programmers.

  • What you say, about these types of not questions helping educating crowd, is beautiful in theory. Sadly, in practice, the ever growing amount of users sees an ever growing number of duplicates, broad and un reproducible questions. Not exactly sure where they will learn they shouldn't do the same... – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Feb 6 '16 at 3:55
3

It's a sad state of affairs and a sad state to be in, but a lot of high-rep users and even more low-rep users are actively caring about one thing only:

How do I, for a given time investment, score the most reputation quickly?

Any hint of following any of your procedures that you suggested does not do that and will thusly be ignored by these people at large.

-18

Sometimes you just need an answer.

  • truth is rarely accepted; however, if Microsoft has some strange bug that causes something to not work, I need a quick workaround, the chances dramatically increase such will exist with quantity. Also, for particular situations that one encounters, it isn't always as easy as people think to either find a pre-existing answer on SO, or even anywhere on the web. And we all know: most Microsoft documentation is worthless. – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 14:34
  • NOTE: most of the above can be generalized for people who don't work in the Microsoft stack... – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 14:34
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    I don't think you're being downvoted for saying the "truth". Nobody will deny that people need answers to questions, it's the whole purpose of this site. The point is that "just needing an answer" is no excuse for posting questions or answers of low quality, nor is it an answer to this question. – CodeCaster Feb 5 '16 at 14:35
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    if I have a specific problem, I'd rather see a "low quality answer" -- even one with the words "try this" (which may indicate variance among, say versions of SSMS, VS, etc, asa well as natural humility, and not just lack of confidence; not to mention one doesn't always have the relevant compiler handy, etc.) than no answer at all! If too many "low quality answers" are deleted, than some specific problems will have no answer at all.... sometimes even a suggestion has helped me find my own answer, even though it didn't directly answer the question at hand. Oh well... – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 14:39
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    Yeah, you. But this site isn't for the askers. If you need help now, it's best to not post on Stack Overflow. "Try this" and "see this link" answers are rarely helpful for later visitors. – CodeCaster Feb 5 '16 at 14:55
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  • actually if it's not for the asker, it's of less value... – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 16:15
  • I have a "popular question" badge (and some related badges) because one of my questions got lots of views... at the time, I needed an answer. I am altruistic, and glad it helped others, but if I didn't "need an answer now", I wouldn't have asked it.. Pretty sure this is true of the vast majority of questions here. We're software developers, not math professors ... stackoverflow.com/questions/334896/… – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 16:19
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    The top voted answer has 12 upvotes out of 32 thousand views, which means it's probably not helping that much people. But again, my question is about answers. All answers to your question explain something. None of them are downvoted. So that question and its answers are irrelevant to my question. – CodeCaster Feb 5 '16 at 16:38
  • even a question without any answers at all shows other people that someone is experiencing the same thing. – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 16:53
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    @JosephDoggie How is that helpful? – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 5 '16 at 18:15
  • believe me, it's good to know that is not unique to your system.... – JosephDoggie Feb 5 '16 at 18:40

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