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In the recent time, we have seen an increased number of questions which treat Stack Overflow as a free debugging tool. I am speaking from mostly tag, but I would not be surprised if the same trend could be observed in other tags as well.

A good example of such questions is https://stackoverflow.com/questions/35161961/segmentation-fault-11-in-c-program. There is nothing valuable in this question for future readers, and what is even worse, it promotes wrong attitude.

The good thing is, such questions are closed pretty quickly. The bad thing is, currently there is no closing reason which fully reflects the reason for closure. Often 'questions seeking debugging help...' is used, but in this particular case, and many others, this reason formally does not apply - there is full code and there is a description of the problem. As a result, we can't send clear message to both the OP and future posters.

It would serve the SO community well to either create a new reason (code-named 'Stack Overflow is not your rent-a-code for free') or extend the description for an already existing one to clearly indicate the necessity of the OP's own work towards a solution.

An example of a clear reason might look like this:

Stack Overflow is an enthusiast-supported public forum. While we enjoy answering questions, we believe learning to be a two-way street. We want to see the effort on the other side, rather than be treated like a free troubleshooting service. Please show us some efforts on how you tried to fix the problem.

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    A recurring Swift question is unexpectedly found nil while unwrapping an Optional value. – user4151918 Feb 2 '16 at 20:06
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    Yes, it is merely annoying when no attempt at debugging has been made. It is intensely annoying when some debugging has, (supposedly), been done, but the poster has not deigned to tell us what was discovered, ('I've been stuck all day trying to fix this'). – Martin James Feb 2 '16 at 20:17
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    I'm still optimistic that once the Documentation feature rolls out, we can provide guides that walk people through how to solve specific cases like this. While some people may still expect to be fed the answer, others may become more self-sufficient. – user4151918 Feb 2 '16 at 20:29
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    @MartinJames - And the inevitable down vote from the OP to the first person who answers along with a comment saying, "I already tried that". – BSMP Feb 2 '16 at 20:30
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    c++? It seems like, you didn't see the php tag :/ – Christian Gollhardt Feb 2 '16 at 22:30
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    @ChristianGollhardt Is PHP even considered being a serious programming language? Just joking ;-) ... – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 2 '16 at 22:45
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    Maybe it's time for a canonical "What is a segmentation fault and how do I debug it?" question? – Cody Gray Feb 3 '16 at 1:23
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    Please don't call it a forum... – LisaMM Feb 3 '16 at 8:47
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    @BSMP yes, and since pickaxe handles and baseball bats don't work over the internet, we both stay out of jail. – Martin James Feb 3 '16 at 9:35
  • @LisaMM, of course. This was just a draft example. – SergeyA Feb 3 '16 at 12:40
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    You forget the questions like "Can u plaes du me homwork!". It would be nice to have a closing reason "Wants his code written", but is mostly covered with the reason "Shows no effort at all". – ctst Feb 3 '16 at 12:41
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    isn't the current close reason for that question appropriate enough? it doesn't have a clear problem statement! – Daniel A. White Feb 3 '16 at 13:04
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    close - off-topic because - other - I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because ... [Questions seeking debugging help without a clear problem statement and MCVE are not useful to other readers, SO is not a free troubleshooting service] – ASh Feb 3 '16 at 13:08
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    I saw an even better one the other day. The guy asked the community to debug his assignment so he could play Xbox with his friends. Sending a clearer message is probably a good thing. – Eric J. Feb 4 '16 at 1:19
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    I feel that it most cases questions asking for a help with some basic error (segmentation fault, null pointer exception etc.) can be closed as a duplicate, e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/2346806/what-is-segmentation-fault – Sulthan Feb 4 '16 at 9:18
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Well, as mentioned in my comments it might not really need to provide an extra close reason, but just making lack of debugging efforts more prominent.

At least the last section in the MCVE link shows already a hint how to debug a program:

"For more information on how to debug your program so you can create a minimal example, Eric Lippert has a fantastic blog post on the subject: How to debug small programs."

Also

"... a specific problem or error ..."

should cover most of these questions as well. Just asking about "I'm getting a segmentation fault" without further specification where exactly, and why it's unexpected is too broad and unlikely to be helpful for future research.


Also the phrase "Questions seeking debugging help ..." implies that debugging has been done from OP's side already, no matter if they understand what debugging actually means.


Though, if you have a concrete proposal how the wording of that actual close reason might be improved I'll support it.


As a side note: Most of these (newbie) users don't tend to read what they're told in our close reasons anyway. They think that Stack Overflow is a forum or their personal help desk. Clearer close reasons won't help to get rid of that flood of questions like "Fix my code please", because if the question was closed it's just too late in most of the cases.

Sometimes OPs going to improve their questions after these are put [on hold], but that's really rare from my experience.

I don't see the benefit of another close reason, what we have already works (somehow) well enough.

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    I would use something like that: Stack Overflow is an enthusiast-supported public forum. While we enjoy answering questions, we believe learning to be two-way street. We want to see the effort on the other side, rather than be treated like a free troubleshooting service. Please show us some efforts on how did you try to fix the problem. – SergeyA Feb 2 '16 at 20:18
  • Something to that effect. But keep in mind, english is not my natural language. – SergeyA Feb 2 '16 at 20:19
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    It's not just 'lack of debugging efforts', it's the 'I can't be bothered to tell you what I did and what I found out. I want YOU all to repeat my efforts and compile, link, test and debug it all for me, in parallel'. – Martin James Feb 2 '16 at 20:19
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    I'd agree with modifying the description, but I'm not sure it would do much to stop the influx of questions from people who don't know how to debug specific problems. By the time a bad question gets closed, the OP has gotten some form of help from a comment or answer. – user4151918 Feb 2 '16 at 20:20
  • @PetahChristian, there is an utter futility in everything we do, no denying that. :D. But at least we should show some efforts (pun intended). – SergeyA Feb 2 '16 at 20:22
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    @SergeyA I feel the obligation to remark that "Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers". from the tour first line not a forum to exchange ideas and talk about the weather. – llrs Feb 3 '16 at 10:32
  • @Llopis, I fully accept this comment. – SergeyA Feb 3 '16 at 12:39
  • "Also the phrase "Questions seeking debugging help ..." implies that debugging has been done from OP's side already, no matter if they understand what debugging actually means." - No, that implies that that close reason doesn't apply to Gimme Teh Codez questions that don't ask for debugging help. I would live to have that close reason reworded a little, so it more obviously applies to this kind of questions. – GolezTrol Feb 4 '16 at 20:29
  • @GolezTrol I actually didn't say that rewording won't be helpful, provide a clearer on you can think of please. – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 4 '16 at 20:31
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The bad thing is, currently there is no closing reason which fully reflects the reason for closure.

If there isn't a close reason for it, then don't close it, downvote it. Closing it when there isn't a defined reason to do so only breeds contempt among everyone involved (except the people who voted to close).

It affects how other people handle questions that should be downvoted, it affects moderator resources since we have to then re-open these questions, and it affects all of the different queues we use to determine whiçh questions should stay open and which should be closed.

As πάντα ῥεῖ says in their answer, if the question doesn't contain a specific problem or error, and it doesn't contain an minimal complete verifiable example, then it should be closed.

If it contains both a specific problem or error, and it contains an MCVE (and there's no other defined reason to close it), and you think it's a bad question, then downvote it.

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    There is a problem with closing vs downvoting. Closing prevents future answers, downvoting does not. As a result, a heavily downvoted question still attracts answers, people answer, OP get's what they needed (they could not care less for the reputation), spreads the word about wonderful SO site among their fellow students and the vicious circle continues. – SergeyA Feb 2 '16 at 20:46
  • And I do not think you understood what πάντα ῥεῖ said. If you look at the question, it was πάντα ῥεῖ who actually closed it (among others). I know the user πάντα ῥεῖ is very active closing such questions with very this reason. It's just πάντα ῥεῖ believes that the reason actually is clear enough, while I think it might be clearer. – SergeyA Feb 2 '16 at 20:50
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    @SergeyA If you downvote, it causes them to not be able to ask future questions; whereas if you close (but it's not negatively scored), it won't hit them as fast (if at all). You may want to "punish" the OP for not "following the rules", but if that's what you really want, you should be downvoting the post. – George Stocker Feb 2 '16 at 20:54
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    @SergeyA "I know the user πάντα ῥεῖ is very active closing such questions with very this reason. It's just πάντα ῥεῖ believes that the reason actually is clear enough, while I think it might be clearer." I don't think it's just/only me, I'm often enough agreed from 4 other users. – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 2 '16 at 21:22
  • @πάνταῥεῖ, do not get me wrong! I suppose, George is saying that you believe in downvoting vs closing - I was arguing that you do believe in closing. 'As πάντα ῥεῖ says ... then it should be closed.... ... if it contains both a specific problem or error, and it contains an MCVE ... then downvote it'. I was highlighting the fact that you do believe in closing such questions, as you do. – SergeyA Feb 2 '16 at 21:31
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    @SergeyA I'm mostly doing both actions down- and close-voting. – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 2 '16 at 21:35
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    "If there isn't a close reason for it, then don't close it, downvote it." - Are you saying that a close reason should not be added for this because there isn't already a close reason for this? – immibis Feb 3 '16 at 2:33
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    @immibis We've had a lot of experience with closing questions; and we have a lot of data to go off of. In fact, this particular feature request has been brought up quite a few times; and we actually implemented it at one point. It was abused, terribly. – George Stocker Feb 3 '16 at 2:41
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    "I don't care what they do. I use a different burner-account for each question. I have a script that keeps me topped-up with a dozen, ready for use" – Martin James Feb 3 '16 at 9:44
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    Or... we could add a new close reason "This is a bad question" or whatever that instead of a radio button next to it, it would have a downvote button. sort of a just in time training for those that are using close votes when downvotes should be used instead. – Kevin B Feb 3 '16 at 16:33
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    @KevinB I really like that idea. – George Stocker Feb 3 '16 at 18:54
  • It can surely be downvoted for not enough (re)search. – Trilarion Feb 4 '16 at 9:03
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    "If there isn't a close reason for it, then don't close it, downvote it." Huh? We're discussing the addition of a new close reason. Essentially, we're discussing whether we ought to have a close reason for such questions. Saying that there isn't one yet and therefore we should never have one is not productive unless you explain why these questions should remain unclosed. – Nicol Bolas Feb 4 '16 at 15:22
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    yes, but who decides what is enough effort? That's what was wrong with the previous close reason. Too subjective, too broad, it hit too many questions. You could stretch "not constructive" to mean whatever you want it to. – Kevin B Feb 4 '16 at 16:02
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    The first step before coming up with close reason text should be to make a collection of example questions that we as a community agree should be closed that don't already fall under one of the other close reasons. I don't expect that to be a very easy task. – Kevin B Feb 4 '16 at 16:13
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If a question is asking us to debug some code, it can be considered an example of a more general question: how do I debug any program. When the answer would probably be clear if the program were examined using a debugger, it can be considered an example of the more general question: what is a debugger and how can it help me diagnose problems.

I've got so sick of these questions I tried to create a canonical question:

What is a debugger and how can it help me diagnose problems?

I close these questions as a duplicate of that question.

  • So close them as duplicates of a canonical debugging question? I like that approach a lot. (And maybe additional downvoting because of not enough (re)search.) – Trilarion Feb 4 '16 at 9:05
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I cannot see the original question anymore but I doubt that it was not formally close-worthy if it was also bad.

The "seeking debugging help" close reason clearly states that you have to supply "the shortest code necessary to reproduce it" in the question.

I would argue that most probably the poster did not present the shortest possible code. On the other hand, if he did indeed supply the shortest possible code then it is either a "simple typographical error" (next close reason) or it is a potentially interesting question which should not be closed per se.

In any way, then also the chances are high that it was already asked before on Stackoverflow. So as a last resort it may be closable as a duplicate.

If additionally the question shows that not much (re)search was done, one can additionally downvote it.

Summary:

With "seeking debugging help", "simple typographical error" and "duplicate" we should have enough tools to close such questions. We can also downvote them if not showing enough research.

However, currently we cannot effectively prohibit answers to these "low effort" questions during the time it needs to close them. This is a larger problem and is discussed in many current comments.

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Close as off-topic, because:

Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

The example in the question does not specify a specific problem, "segmentation fault" could be caused by anything. (Similarly, "does not work" is not a problem description either.)

The code posted is somewhat compact, I don't think it needs to be shortened further.

The question would be ok if the OP only posted at which line the problem occurs. Which would mean that they have tried to debug it themselves but still don't understand the source of the bug.

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