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A discussion about open-discussion questions

Open discussions about programming-related that are somewhat open-discussion "questions" are usually frowned upon in the Stack Overflow community and more often than not result in the question being closed as either 'opinion-based' or 'too broad'. What defines such a question? In order to clarify my question, let's take a look at Stack Overflow's advice on asking good questions.


Guidelines of the Stack Overflow Community

As per the guidelines indicated on https://stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic, questions that satisfy the criteria of being:

Quote A:

  • a specific programming problem, or
  • a software algorithm, or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development

are within the scope of Stack Overflow. Additionally, according to https://stackoverflow.com/help/dont-ask:

Quote B:

To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions:

  • every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?”
  • your answer is provided along with the question, and you expect more answers: “I use ______ for ______, what do you use?”
  • there is no actual problem to be solved: “I’m curious if other people feel like I do.”
  • you are asking an open-ended, hypothetical question: “What if ______ happened?”
  • your question is just a rant in disguise: “______ sucks, am I right?”

If my understanding is correct, this means that questions asked on Stack Overflow should not be opinion-based or looking for the general opinion towards a topic, but should be asking a clear question with a clear answer and be about something that the asker does not already know.

But wait, there's more below:

Quote C:

Some subjective questions are allowed, but “subjective” does not mean “anything goes”. All subjective questions are expected to be constructive. What does that mean? Constructive subjective questions:

  • inspire answers that explain “why” and “how”
  • tend to have long, not short, answers
  • have a constructive, fair, and impartial tone
  • invite sharing experiences over opinions
  • insist that opinion be backed up with facts and references
  • are more than just mindless social fun

These points here say that questions asked should try to be unbiased, attract "high-quality" answers, tap into more experienced users' experiences and not be "mindless social fun"...?


Where are the boundaries?

As with all criteria, there will always be grey areas where the question asked may satisfy half of a criteria here, and another half there. Take, for example, "Why do people hate Java?", which I was contemplating asking before the following appeared (which is why I came here to ask):

Wait! Some of your past questions have not been well-received, and you're in danger of being blocked from asking any more.

For help formulating a clear, useful question, see: How do I ask a good question?

Also, edit your previous questions to improve formatting and clarity.

The question "Why do people hate Java?" would seem like an opinion-based open-discussion question at first sight, though, for the sake of clarity let's run this example question through all three guide quotes A, B and C.

According to Quote A, the question "Why do people hate Java?" is not a specific programming problem, not a software algorithm, is (a set of) software tools commonly used by programmers and is, although unlikely a practical, answerable problem, unique to software development and in fact quite commonly discussed amongst programmers themselves.

According to Quote B, the question "Why do people hate Java?" has equally valid answers (though, honestly, I feel that this criteria isn't really valid on its own because every answer is valid in the answerer's eyes, but that's off-topic), the answer is not provided within the question, there is no problem to be solved as the question is requesting for the opinion of the general population, is not an open-ended question neither is it a rant in disguise.

Finally, according to Quote C, the question "Why do people hate Java?", though not impartial on the answerer's side, does inspire answers that discuss "Why people hate Java" and "How people came to hate Java", answers that would certainly have long explanations which share the experience of more experienced programmers and what they feel and think about this topic, and is certainly beyond mindless social fun, whatever that means.

Since such a question would satisfy half of Quotes A and B and pretty much the whole of Quote C (except for the impartial bit) but would be classified as a question that is "opinion-based", "too broad" or "not having any question in particular", where are the boundaries for defining what "opinion-based" questions are, or are "opinion-based" flags "opinion-based"? Such a question would rapidly bring a flurry of downvotes upon itself. We must also consider the fact that although to us, a question may seem to be completely clear and obviously opinion-based and off-topic, there would still be people who would like to know "Why do people hate Java?".


TL;DR

In essence, my questions are as follows:

  • What defines an "opinion-based open-discussion" question?
  • What would happen if someone asked such a discussion-based question?
  • Are such questions accepted by the Stack Overflow community?
  • Where would be a good place to ask such a question?
  • Are "opinion-based" grounds for closing supposedly opinion-based questions opinion-based? (optional)

closed as too broad by Louis, HaveNoDisplayName, Glorfindel, Luke, Daniel Daranas Jan 27 '16 at 16:19

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Since such a question would satisfy half of Quotes A and B and pretty much the whole of Quote C... Respectfully disagree. I don't see how Why do people hate Java? would qualify as having a constructive, fair, and impartial tone. In fact, I'm pretty sure many people don't hate Java, and most don't even care. – Frédéric Hamidi Jan 27 '16 at 14:30
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    You're asking a collection of questions that have already been answered before on Meta. For instance, "Where would be a good place to ask such a question?" has been asked here and was a duplicate when it was asked (follow the trail to find an answer). Please search through Meta to find the previous discussions that address your questions here and edit your question to remove issues that have already been answered before. – Louis Jan 27 '16 at 14:30
  • It also fails the general too broad off-topic reason. – ryanyuyu Jan 27 '16 at 14:31
  • If there remain problems for you that have not been answered yet before, then edit your question to narrow down on what has not been answered, preferably with reference to previous questions on the topic. – Louis Jan 27 '16 at 14:31
  • "Where would be a good place to ask such a question?" - What is part of the game rules? Do you want any kind of useful information as a result of asking the question? If so: experienced people in the circle of people you know and trust. – Gimby Jan 27 '16 at 14:47
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    @HansPassant: Is you're point that it is impossible to clearly define "opinion-based?" – Robert Harvey Jan 27 '16 at 15:30
  • @HansPassant that is self-evident though, of course, that's only my opinion. – Martin James Jan 27 '16 at 15:35
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    It is my point that asking for a hard definition of a what is subjective and opinion-based is usually pointless and should not be pursued. It also varies a great deal among [tag] communities. We all know it when we see it. If it is not self-evident to a questioner then we rarely avoid educating him about it. – Hans Passant Jan 27 '16 at 15:41
  • "Why do people hate java" "is (a set of) software tools"??? No. Java is, sure. But people's opinions of something is NOT that something. Which is good, because I'm not an asshole. – Will Jan 27 '16 at 17:30
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Rule of Thumb: a question only has to violate one of the bullet points in your Quote B to be considered "Primarily Opinion-Based."


It's not uncommon for folks to look at the rules on Stack Overflow in a legalistic fashion, and to assume that there are unambiguous criteria for closing a question. By and large, this is not true; for the most part, the closing criteria is somewhat subjective (by design). This is why we need a close vote system; it requires the concurring opinions of five people to close a question. If the closing criteria were objective, we could all agree on the topicality of any given question, and closing would be uncontroversial.

Nevertheless, there are still clear guidelines to follow. To explain what I mean, I requote something you quoted in your question:

  • a specific programming problem, or
  • a software algorithm, or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development

Notice the part that I highlighted? This distinction is important: many folks used to come to Stack Overflow and assume that, if their question merely satisfied one of these bullets, it was automatically on-topic. The "and is" wording was added to emphasize that it needs to be an actual question about an actual problem, not some hypothetical navel gazing.


With that, here are your bullets in order:

What defines an "opinion-based open-discussion" question?

Despite the fact that "Name that Thing" questions are controversial on Programmers, I'm going to use one as an example, because it's the easiest way I can think of to illustrate the difference.

Not opinion-based:

  • What is the name of this well-known concept?

Opinion-based:

  • What should I name my variable?

What would happen if someone asked such a discussion-based question?

It will get closed.

Are such questions accepted by the StackOverflow community?

No.

Where would be a good place to ask such a question?

Quora, Reddit or Slant.co are possible options.

Are "opinion-based" grounds for closing supposedly opinion-based questions opinion-based?

Unfortunately, it can be difficult to know whether or not a subjective question will be productive, in terms of the quality of the answers it will produce. It depends on whether or not the community will take the question seriously and provide quality answers, or whether they will bikeshed it.

One surefire way to guarantee bikeshedding is to add flamebait to a question. "Why do people hate Java" is a perfect example of a question which, if left open, will inevitably become a huge distraction. It runs afoul of the "your question is just a rant in disguise: “___ sucks, am I right?” bullet point. It is a shining example of "primarily opinion-based," and a detailed analysis is not required to figure that out.

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What defines an "opinion-based open-discussion" question?

A question that does not have a correct answer or solution.

Example #1 : What is the best programming language? (Impossible, we must close this)

Example #2: What's a good way to securely store file uploads? I'm currently doing... (Even though each answer could differ here, it's not impossible as the first question)

What would happen if someone asked such a discussion-based question?

Question would/should be vote closed by SO community

Are such questions accepted by the StackOverflow community?

According to the rules, No.

Where would be a good place to ask such a question?

Good is pretty subjective right? This would be an "option-based-open-discussion" question I think. Anyhow, I'd find some discussion forums.

Are "opinion-based" grounds for closing supposedly opinion-based questions opinion-based? (optional)

No. The rules of SO clearly spells out that it isn't allowd.

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