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Help Center states that the OP should perform sufficient research before asking a question. Is there a need for research efforts for a short and specific code block?

I, and I assume some (if not most) of the readers of this post, have learnt our coding through examples. Sometimes, when you encounter a piece of short code (an instruction or two) for the first time, it is more educating to understand the specific logic of the tiny code block, before reading a whole reference or a heavy blog post, full of new concepts, about the subject.

In cases that the OP brings a code, that is really short and can be explained within a few sentences, without proof of research, why not answering?

Have a look at the following example:

example for small and specific code (Disclosure: I provided an accepted answer to this question. I felt a little guilt for answering this ("bad") question hence wanted to know what the community thinks about it)

The provided code concerns some general concepts in (not only) JavaScript, including scope closures and functional programming. However it seems (to me at least) that the OP is mainly referring to the func.call(null,str) part. So let's assume (even if the assumption is wrong in the above example case) that the range of answers for this question is not too broad.

I'm not sure if I can give the OP the benefit of a doubt that he at least looked at the relevant reference. Moreover, I have no way to determine whether this is a copy-paste situation.

However, if a short explanation accompanied by references, can be given fast, is there a good reason to avoid answering the question just because no research has been done?

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    Questions need to be clear in 1st place. Don't make assumptions for answering, that's not helpful in the long term view for a good question and answer pair. That your answer was accepted has almost no significance regarding this. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 24 '16 at 14:03
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    I found at least one possible duplicate for that question, so whatever the close voters were doing they should have done that, including the high-reps that were commenting – rene Jan 24 '16 at 14:06
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I, and I assume some (if not most) of the readers of this post, have learnt our coding through examples. Sometimes, when you encounter a piece of short code (an instruction or two) for the first time, it is more educating to understand the specific logic of the tiny code block, before reading a whole reference or a heavy blog post, full of new concepts, about the subject.

And why exactly does that have to involve asking a question on Stack Overflow?

I have no problem with someone learning by example. The problem is when they're not learning by example. Asking such a question here is not "learning by example", it's making us write a tutorial for them.

However it seems (to me at least) that the OP is mainly referring to the func.call(null,str) part.

And yet, the OP very clearly said, "please explain this code , on the whole.[sic]" (emphasis added). So however much the OP may have focused on that particular statement, the post clearly was asking for an answer that comprehensively explained the code in question.

However, if a short explanation accompanied by references, can be given fast, is there a good reason to avoid answering the question just because no research has been done?

I have 3. By answering such questions, you are:

  1. Encouraging the OP to not learn on their own, thus denying them the ability to learn how to work things out on their own. This makes the OP dependent upon others for their programming issues, rather than helping them become independent.

  2. Helping only the OP, since odds are good that nobody else with this problem will be able to find such questions in the future.

  3. Making Stack Overflow seem less like a Q&A site and more like a help desk. That's not what SO is for.

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    Thank you for the reply. I was not looking at it from such perspective. – remdevtec Jan 24 '16 at 16:25

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