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Ever since I have been at SO, I have seen questions about NullReferenceExceptions get closed as a duplicate almost every time and immediately. If every question on that topic was to be closed as a duplicate of this famous question, what is the purpose for the tag?

Also,

  • What sort of questions on this topic are liable to be closed immediately?
  • What sort of questions on this topic are deemed to be good/ok?
  • An object reference is null and so cannot be dereferenced. There's not really a huge lot that can be said.... I didn't know there was a tag. If I had known, I would have tried to think up some suitable 'Burninate' title. – Martin James Jan 24 '16 at 9:02
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    What is the purpose for the [nullreferenceexception] tag? Well, to decorate the canonical, of course. – Frédéric Hamidi Jan 24 '16 at 9:07
  • Oh, OK, that ^^^^ – Martin James Jan 24 '16 at 9:08
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    There are plenty of cases where NullReferenceException has a non-obvious explanation and dup-linking to the canonical is not appropriate. A good example is this Q+A. Note what the OP did, he documented it well with a good repro snippet. Required. – Hans Passant Jan 24 '16 at 9:43
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What sort of questions on this topic are liable to be closed immediately?

As someone hammering dupes as soon as I find them, I would say if it's obvious that the poster has not yet read the canonical post. Because if he has not read it, his question is most likely so broad and only answerable through guesswork that there is no point in trying to answer it. Or it's so simple that it should be closed as "typo/not helping future visitors". Either way, closing it as broad or typo won't help him, so we point him to the canonical.

What sort of questions on this topic are deemed to be good/ok?

Any kind of question is good, that shows effort and shows the OP has understood what a NullReferenceException is and how to fix it. If he still has questions and cannot solve his problem, that's fine. Most likely he now knows what information to provide so we can help efficiently.

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