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I'm asking because I notice that comment flags include the option of too chatty, and I was wondering, is there some sort of agreed line between a relevant, humorous joke, and something that is just too much on a tangent to be acceptable?

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    @Servy thanks for the link. I understand that there's a little less tolerance for humorous questions than there is for humorous comments. I feel comfortable with my understanding of allowed humor in questions, it's just comments I'm iffy about. – Patrick Roberts Jan 21 '16 at 14:37
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    I think one or two joke comments are okay in a bigger question. However, If the whole comment chain turns into a joke/meme battle, perhaps then the comments need to be moved to chat. – Mage Xy Jan 21 '16 at 14:40
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    @MageXy I don't have any examples on-hand, but I have seen some singleton jokes that have been flagged for deletion, so I suspect your premise is probably a bit on the liberal side. – Patrick Roberts Jan 21 '16 at 14:46
  • I meant as opposed to a chain, as MageXy stated, and that was just the first word I thought to use as an antonym. – Patrick Roberts Jan 21 '16 at 14:52
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    Everybody likes a good chuckle of course. Making everybody laugh and offend nobody, that's not that easy. Spontaneous and complimentary geeky humor tends to work, good ones do survive. This one worked, for example. Don't flag it please :) – Hans Passant Jan 21 '16 at 15:29
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    @HansPassant i promise not to use this SEDE query to find your most upvoted comments and flag them all. – ryanyuyu Jan 21 '16 at 15:33
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    Remember that one person's "humour" is another person's "that guy's a total ignoramus, I'd better flag and save him from himself". To make up for saving them, I can be brutal in response. The piles (well, close to 100) of garbage-passing-as-humour that I flag so attest. If you want to be funny, code without your pants. Just don't let us know about it. – Bill Woodger Jan 22 '16 at 8:18
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    In my experience, there is quite a lot of unintentional humour on StackOverflow, as people take things far, far too seriously. Can't find it, but there was one example where someone said he laughs at the fools who downvote him if there's nothing wrong with his answer, and then someone else got upset and said this was wrong, and he was going to downvote it..iirc. This question itself is a bit of another example too - could anyone, apart from software engineers take joking so seriously? – user1725145 Jan 22 '16 at 10:04
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    My whole existence on stack overflow is being put into question. – Stryner Jan 22 '16 at 15:42
  • @Stryner But that is a serious problem of yours, not fun at all. – Teemu-callmewhateveryouwant Jan 22 '16 at 23:56
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From the Help Center, When should I comment?:

When should I comment?

You should submit a comment if you want to:

  • Request clarification from the author;
  • Leave constructive criticism that guides the author in improving the post;
  • Add relevant but minor or transient information to a post (e.g. a link to a related question, or an alert to the author that the question has been updated).

As you can see, "being a clown" is not on that list. Comments, when flagged, will almost always be removed. Posting a comment just for the sake of being funny is not useful, and your comment will be prone to deletion.

Unless the mod handling the flag finds it funny enough, mumble mumble.

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    So in general, you're saying that humor should at least attempt to address one of those bullet points in order to be acceptable? – Patrick Roberts Jan 21 '16 at 15:20
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    Not just me, try searching meta. Using humor over text, and humor in an international setting, you can have a hard time getting your message across. – CodeCaster Jan 21 '16 at 15:22
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    @PatrickRoberts even comments fitting those bullet points are subject to deletion at the hands of "obsolete" comment flags. Almost all comments can be deleted, but especially ones that never fit one of the bullet points. Funny ones probably just get flagged less often. – ryanyuyu Jan 21 '16 at 15:30
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    @PatrickRoberts: No, it's the other way around. You don't start with a humorous comment and attempt to make it relevant. If it's not relevant to start with, skip it. However, if you do have a relevant comment, attempting to add humor is perfectly OK. – MSalters Jan 21 '16 at 16:23
  • @MSalters I apologize if I came across as if that was my intention. I assure you that I understand the primary purpose of a comment should be one of those 3 reasons. – Patrick Roberts Jan 22 '16 at 10:10
  • Simply forbidding jokes is a psychopath attitude. – user259412 Jan 22 '16 at 12:20
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    @peterh nowhere is it stated that they are forbidden, you simply can't complain if they get removed. – CodeCaster Jan 22 '16 at 12:46
  • @CodeCaster ...by a person in a surely psychologically perfect state. – user259412 Jan 22 '16 at 13:15
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    @peterh what are you trying to point out? That you don't like that comments can be deleted? That's fine, but please don't question the mental capabilities of the moderators doing so. Perhaps read How do comments work? on the Overmeta. – CodeCaster Jan 22 '16 at 13:41
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    @peterh if flagged that comment as offensive. Or it was humor? – edc65 Jan 22 '16 at 23:28
  • I disagree. SO is still a community, and allowing for attempts at friendly humour is something that one could argue helps maintain a healthy, non-toxic community. I agree that if the only thing you do on SO is post witty comments for kicks you're probably not contributing much by way of great answers and questions, but are you harming the site? I think linking to the "When Should I Comment" documentation is totally appropriate, but is a bit of a strawman answer to a rather complex question. – GrayedFox Jul 4 at 12:56
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My understanding is that if the comment is an amusing one-off that doesn't cause the answers to digress from the question, it's perfectly acceptable. It's not advised in the FAQ, but clearly they're prevalent enough that a sort of precedent has been set.

"Too Chatty" would be (extreme example) when a user recognises a friend who also commented and says "Oh hey @randomuser, how's it going?*" This contributes nothing to the question and threatens to divert attention away from answering the question.

There are going to be massive grey areas here, like any theoretically-allowed-but-not-in-the-rules situation. If someone doesn't leave the joke alone and creates an off-topic conversation in the comments around it, the whole thing, including the original, is likely to be removed. But if everyone leaves it well alone, upvotes it if they want to and otherwise carry on answering the question, it seems likely (from precedent) that it'll be left for posterity.

*this is where randomuser turns out to be an actual user and gets a confusing notification

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    There appear to five of them if you type "randomuser" in to the user page – TripeHound Jan 22 '16 at 9:28
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    FWIW, you can't be notified from answer text AFAIK. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 22 '16 at 10:10
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    You still code in Javascript! LOL! – Bill Woodger Jan 22 '16 at 13:02
  • @BillWoodger that would be not constructive. – Ashley Medway Jan 22 '16 at 13:09
  • @AshleyMedway well, I see loads of jokes of a similar type, with upvotes. I flag. If the original user is still around I will consider busting them a new bottom-hole. – Bill Woodger Jan 22 '16 at 13:13
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    @BillWoodger fair point, I am not one to deter a good bottom-hole busting. – Ashley Medway Jan 22 '16 at 13:14
  • @BillWoodger, I may just be lucky (or too new, or not around at the right time), but I've seen far more universally amusing comments on established questions that I have opinionated blubber worthy of a bottom-hole busting. That's probably a testament to the level of moderation, but it does imply that there is such a thing as a joke comment that noone finds (ok, most people don't find) offensive. – Ieuan Stanley Jan 22 '16 at 13:19
  • And how are you able to judge "universally amusing"? That's a nice skill to have. You got the lottery numbers as well? You able to find the rear of the major pivot-point in your body without using more than two of your hands? Impressive. – Bill Woodger Jan 22 '16 at 13:23
  • See how it goes :-) ? Oh, and the first point is the serious one. – Bill Woodger Jan 22 '16 at 13:24
  • @BillWoodger, Perhaps universally amusing is the wrong word then: would you be willing to accept "Universally inoffensive, and funny to many"? Take for instance ivami's Singleton joke on the Question comments - it doesn't make fun of singletons (though the setup did, I'll admit), but is amusing nonetheless. 36 people found it amusing enough to upvote. – Ieuan Stanley Jan 22 '16 at 13:32
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    There's much, much more leeway on meta, and there's context on that as well. Universally? No. You (nor anyone else) still don't know that. If an allegedly-amusing comment on the main were entirely off-topic and not directed at anything, so it is just noise, then it is a pointless waste of space. I am sometimes amusing for things like typos or unintended juxtapositions, but happily remove the comment after the edit is in. – Bill Woodger Jan 22 '16 at 13:48
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As a sheer programmer here on S/O, I believe funny comments should be kept indefinitely, unless they insult a specific group of people like Bill Woodger's comment above: "You still code in Javascript! LOL!" is not acceptable because it degrades a huge crowd of programmers. It would also be insulting to degrade a small crowd (what one may think is impossible to find on the Internet: such as the Amish, because someone on here may have an Amish family) or a "dead" programming language, because certain companies still rely on old languages! (Spectrum Health + COBOL).

I believe the occasional funny comment is actually key to a programmer's productivity and his general well-being. Because during those large projects where you haven't left the computer for 5 hours straight trying to debug a problem, most have considered quitting their job, or swearing at their boss, or coming on here and degrading new users on their completely valid questions. Joke comments actually help a sleepless programmers' mind stay open-minded: to consider all the possibilities, including those easy ones such as "duh, this whole time I forgot to put that permission in the Android manifest!" They provide a comic relief that keeps a coder's priorities intact, like "you know what, I've spent a lot of time on this method, I should go try another method." I can't tell you how many times a joke comments has brought me back to my senses while programming, and I thank S/O for that.

TL;DR Keep funny comments unless they degrade a group of people.

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I feel a comment, no matter how funny, should eventually get removed. Questions that get a lot of traffic, usually have tons of comments. And a lot of times, users leave very helpful information in comments. So a funny comment just becomes noise in the system.

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    If those comments were really helpful they should eventually be added as an answer or edit, imo. – Emil Vikström Jan 22 '16 at 8:55
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    Ideally, yes. But often enough they are not. – S Shahid Jan 22 '16 at 9:20
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    Indeed. On popular questions, it is not uncommon to see a high-scored answer with a typo, and a high-scored comment pointing out said typo. Instead of upvoting the comment, take the ten seconds it takes to fix the typo and flag the comment as obsolete... – CodeCaster Jan 22 '16 at 10:00
  • In high traffic questions the many/most slightly relevant too specific/little new info comments are much less useful then a comment with good relevant humour. IMHO at least, but I'm not alone in this according to the comment votes I tend to see. I don't say that there isn't a limit though. – totymedli Jan 22 '16 at 13:19
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In my opinion, every post or comment should be, first of all, helpful. If it is not, then it should get deleted. It shouldn't matter if it's funny or not. You've asked if there is a line. And I'd say this line is the question "is my answer/comment helpful?". If yes, then it's fine. If it's also funny, that's even better. But in the first place, here we're looking for the solutions for problems we encounter, not amusement.

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