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A confession: somehow, after years on Stack Exchange, I'm still nowhere near understanding Very Low Quality flags, and they don't seem to be documented properly anywhere that I can find.

When I flag a post as VLQ, what happens? Does it go to the VLQ queue, or to a moderator queue that I can't see, or to both, or sometimes to one and sometimes to the other? What determines this? Does it depend upon my rep?

animuson says:

Very Low Quality flags push the post into the Low Quality Posts queue (which requires 2k) after being active for 15 minutes. They are generally auto-dismissed by community actions.

But George Stocker says:

By flagging something as very low quality, you're asking for a straight pass to moderator deletion.

How can these two statements be simultaneously true?

And meanwhile... is the "Low Quality" in the name of "Low Quality Posts" review queue intended to have the same meaning as the "Very Low Quality" in the name of the "Very Low Quality" flag? Moderators seem to push the idea that we need to be ultra-conservative in our VLQ-flagging because moderators shouldn't be routinely making deletion decisions that depend upon debatable judgements of post quality, and those decisions should instead be made by the community. (At least, I think that's the rationale; George's answer from an hour ago is just one example of many.) But:

  1. Aren't VLQ flags and the corresponding LQP queue precisely the way that the community makes those decisions? As far as I can tell, VLQ flags, the LQP queue, and delete votes are pretty much analogous to close flags, the close vote queue, and close votes... except that for some arbitrary reason I don't know, in some circumstances that I don't know, a moderator gets involved in the process. Why? It would be obviously unhelpful if the majority of the site's close flags ended up in front of diamond moderators, so why do we have that system for VLQ votes? How are users with deletion privileges supposed to reach the number of delete votes required to nuke a post without bothering the mods if the tools they have to bring deletion-worthy posts to each others' attention bother the mods as a side effect?

  2. VLQ flags aren't presented in the privileges section or Jeff Atwood's post about VLQ flags that's linked to from the privileges section or the text of the flagging dialog itself as involving diamond moderators in any way whatsoever. As far as I can tell there no way at all for a non-Meta-reading user to ever discover that diamond mods have any part to play in their handling. Surely we can communicate about this better, by which I mean at all? The current system we have is that the site seemingly tells users "hey, here's a nifty tool you can use to clean up garbage content without bothering the moderators", and then those users get their flags declined with what seem to be meaningless generic decline reasons and the mods are routinely posting on Meta complaining about VLQ flags that 99% of VLQ flaggers probably never wanted mods involved with in the first place. Wouldn't this be solved, or at least heavily mitigated, by telling ordinary, non-Meta-visiting users how VLQ flags work?

  3. Given that we're supposed to be super-cautious about raising VLQ flags on only the most extreme garbage, does it follow that we should use the same standard when reviewing posts in the LQP queue? Should we be choosing "Looks OK" for pretty much everything? If not, shouldn't there be two different levels of VLQ flag, or shouldn't we be removing mods from this process entirely? It seems obviously perverse to have a system in which I can flag something as VLQ, and then, based upon undocumented factors out of my control, it will get handled by one of two completely separate groups with completely different standards; why not let me choose?

  4. What the heck is even garbagey enough to justify a VLQ flag, anyway, while simultaneously not counting as either Spam or NAA? I gave up on VLQ flagging early in my time on Stack Overflow because my VLQ flags were all (and I think I literally mean "all") just getting declined without explanation. While mods are heavy on emphasising just how very very garbagey a post must be to merit a VLQ flag (yet again, George's post is a good example), I've never seen anyone exhibit a single example of a post that merited a VLQ flag that wouldn't've merited an NAA or Spam flag. An example or two would help me, and perhaps others, finally understand what this feature is for.

I apologise for the breadth of this question; I'd've liked to ask a narrowly scoped question about only the details that I don't understand, but honestly, there's almost nothing about VLQ flags that I do understand, and I don't think that's my fault given that not even the basic mechanics of what they do are documented.

  • There aren't any questions in the Low Quality Posts Review Queue. Questions flagged as VLQ go to triage. I'm pretty sure that there are circumstances where a VLQ flagged question goes to a mod queue regardless of the triage decisions. VLQ flags on answers go to the LQPRQ; however, if the answer gets upvoted or accepted, it still goes to the mod queue. – user4639281 Jan 14 '16 at 0:45
  • For answers, the VLQ flag is a subset of the NaA flag used to describe content that is so illegible that you cannot tell whether it could be an attempt to answer a question or not. The only difference being that it adds a downvote from the community user if the flag is marked helpful. Flags are not a substitute for delete votes, nor a tool to be used to bring posts to the attention of other users with the intent that they cast delete votes. Any time you flag a post, you should be operating under the assumption that it will reach a mod queue. – user4639281 Jan 14 '16 at 0:50
  • In the LQPRQ, you should be reviewing based on whether or not you think the post should have been flagged or not. It makes no difference that you have delete votes or not. If the post should be downvoted and delete voted, but not flagged, then you should choose "looks ok". See: You're doing it wrong: A plea for sanity in the low quality posts queue – user4639281 Jan 14 '16 at 0:55
  • @TinyGiant: I'm not sure, but wasn't one of NAA and VLQ on answer dismissable as "disputed" simply by editing? – Deduplicator Jan 14 '16 at 1:18
  • No, edits mark NaA and VLQ flags as helpful. Benefit of the doubt kind of thing. Hilariously this creates a loophole where you can downvote an answer, flag it as VLQ, then edit it, which causes the flag to be marked helpful, and the community user downvotes the answer giving you a second downvote. However, if someone else comes along and flags it as VLQ it skips the LQPRQ and goes straight to a mod queue. @Deduplicator – user4639281 Jan 14 '16 at 1:22
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    @TinyGiant: Wouldn't the sum of your comments make a good answer? – honk Jan 14 '16 at 10:39
  • @TinyGiant Does it make a difference if the post is edited by the OP or by someone else? Put differently, are both NAA and VLQ flags marked helpful if the post is edited, whoever edited it? – Tunaki Jan 14 '16 at 15:54
  • @Tunaki IIRC No, yes – user4639281 Jan 14 '16 at 15:56
  • "you're asking for a straight pass to moderator deletion" is an outdated understanding, things are different for almost a year now. System has been redesigned to explicitly drop the need for moderator involvement, flagged answers are intended to be handled in LQ review queue. Role of moderators in current system is to provide sort of backup if LQ reviewers act too slowly, for this purpose system passes flag to moderators after certain delay if LQ reviewers did not yet manage to handle it – gnat Jan 14 '16 at 18:59
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    @gnat No matter the post's origin, once it gets to a moderator; that's what you're asking for when you've flagged it as VLQ. The fact that other people saw it in between (but chose not to act) has no bearing on what you're asking when you flag a post a 'very low quality' (note the 'very'). – George Stocker Jan 14 '16 at 19:10
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    @GeorgeStocker I merely describe system feature that is clearly intended to give LQ reviewers priority in handling flagged posts. System sends these posts to LQ queue to be dealt with and only as a backup, if delayed, these are passed to moderators – gnat Jan 14 '16 at 19:38
  • I always use this flag for link-only answers. – Sebastian Simon Jan 15 '16 at 17:23
  • @Xufox VLQ flags are not for link only answers, they are for gibberish. Link only answers should be flagged as NaA. See: Your answer is in another castle: when is an answer not an answer? – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 19:33
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    @Xufox don't necessarily change your flagging behaviour based upon Tiny Giant's comments; what he's asserting is at least a little controversial. He may be right, but the trouble is that VLQ flags are such a mess that it's unclear what exactly they are meant to be for. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 19:40
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    @TinyGiant the only reference in Shog's post to "VLQ" or "Low Quality" is in the image which labels a rotten apple as "Low-Quality". That's hardly a basis for making any serious inferences about what VLQ flags should be used for. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 19:48
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My personal opinion is that "very low quality" flags should either be hidden from moderators completely or be removed as a flag type. They are not a good use of our time, and there's just too much confusion about what they are to be used for.

Some people flag any answer that competes with theirs as "very low quality". Some people run a search and flag every question with a downvote as "very low quality". Some people flag questions as "very low quality" but never vote to close. Most people seem to regard the flag as a super-downvote.

This flag used to only be shown to moderators, and we tended to be more generous when accepting those, but we were always confused as to what that should apply to. Then they started being used as audit triggers and we were told to be much more strict in their application.

The creation of the review queues allowed many flags to be offloaded from moderators, such as all close vote flags. At the rate at which those were increasing, had this not been done the moderation system would have broken down a while ago. After that, "very low quality" flags started adding to the review cases in the Low Quality Posts review queue (which had largely been populated by heuristics before this).

To help out moderators, these flags were delayed from showing up in the moderator tools until they had been in review for an hour. Unfortunately, the community isn't processing these flags fast enough to keep up with the rate at which they are being used, so the short delay doesn't hide many of these from moderators (there are 136 of them in the queue as I write this). Even if it was a 24 hour delay, it wouldn't do much for many of the flags we see.

Then triage came along and added another layer to this. I wasn't sure how moderators should act on these flags, so I asked about it. Shog9's guidance there is how moderators handle these at present:

  • Is this an exceptional case where the community isn't able to get rid of trash fast enough? Delete.

  • Else, Decline.

I recognize that this differs from what most people think of when they use this flag, but until we're told otherwise, this is how we're handling them. I don't think this guidance is going to change, since moderators really shouldn't be used to handle things that the community has the tools to deal with.

Looking at the way they most commonly are used, and the various levels of review they feed into, I don't think they are particularly useful flags for moderators to act on. That's why I think they should either be removed as a flag class or not shown to moderators at all. The downside to the former is that there can be utility in having these kick really terrible questions into review, and the downside to the latter is that these flags may build up in a review queue faster than they can be acted on.

  • I don't think that misuse of a tool is a reason to get rid of the tool. Otherwise the NaA flag should be removed as well, I'm fairly certain that flag is misused just as much. – user4639281 Jan 14 '16 at 17:03
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    I think I agree with your analysis of what needs to be done. The only thing that I personally wish you'd provided here is an example of a post - any post at all - that would warrant a VLQ flag under the current regime. The standard seems to be absurdly high, and it's unclear to me whether there even is a class of post that deserves a VLQ flag but not an NAA flag - @TinyGiant, in his answer, suggests that there isn't, and I'm not sure whether or not you agree. – Mark Amery Jan 14 '16 at 19:26
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    @MarkAmery - That's the problem. The community has gained so many capabilities when it comes to low quality questions that there's little that requires our immediate attention which isn't handled by spam, offensive, "not an answer", or other flags. For moderator-handled flags, all I can think of are wildly off-topic questions or complete unintelligible gibberish. The scope is much broader for something that ends up in the review queues, so you'll get a very different experience if you flag is processed there or times out of review and is handled by a moderator. – Brad Larson Jan 14 '16 at 19:55
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    Most people seem to regard the flag as a super-downvote. That's the biggest problem with VLQ of late. People are flagging incorrect answers as VLQ (that's what downvotes are for). As with the Triage "Needs Improvement" button, I think it's just too vague. – Machavity Jan 15 '16 at 14:57
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    @BradLarson wildly off-topic questions can be handled with close flags and gibberish can be handled with NAA, so even your best attempt to think of a use case for the VLQ flag seems to have failed. Sounds like it serves no purpose in its current form and either needs to be removed altogether or made into a truly community-handled flag, with moderator involvement removed, so that the conditions for it applying can be relaxed a little. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:14
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    "Some people flag questions as 'very low quality' but never vote to close." The system disables casting a VLQ flag after you have cast a close vote. Casting the vote afterwards has a strong feel of finding your parents at opposite ends of the house and asking them each independently if you can use the car. Leaving aside any fuzzy issues like that, it's not unreasonable to assume as a user, based on the disabling I mentioned, that there's also interaction when they're cast in that order. This is all probably just another reason for your proposal: mods should never get VLQ flags. – jscs Mar 1 '16 at 19:07
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    If the flag is being misused that badly, perhaps people should need a certain minimum reputation, and/or to have proven themselves a good enough judge of quality (possibly determined by review badges), before they're allowed to use it? – Justin Time - Reinstate Monica Dec 3 '16 at 20:49
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There are no questions in the Low Quality Posts Review Queue. Questions flagged as VLQ go to triage, or a moderator queue. There's no real way of knowing whether or not a question flagged as VLQ is going to end up in a moderator queue, so just operate under the assumption that they go straight to a mod queue and will be seen by a moderator.

Answers flagged as VLQ go to the LQPRQ, unless the answer gets upvoted or accepted (as well as other unknown reasons), in which case it still goes to a moderator queue, so just operate under the assumption that they go straight to a mod queue and will be seen by a moderator.

Did you notice the recurring theme here? When you're flagging something with anything other than a close flag, there is a very high probability that it is going to end up in front of a moderator. Sure there are these fancy queues and such that help us lowly humans curate some content, but you should never flag something hoping that it won't end up in a moderator queue. Inevitably, you are going to be wrong and it will end up in front of a moderator.

For questions, George Stocker's definition is pretty decent. Basically, this flag is for horrible content with zero likelihood of being improved. You can't improve it, no one from the community can improve it, and the author isn't likely to make anything good out of it. You are saying that closing the question is a waste of time, and it should just be nuked from orbit as soon as humanly possible. Depending on your preferred activities, you probably won't see a lot of questions that qualify for the VLQ flag, and not every horrible question deserves one either, but they do exist.

For answers, the VLQ flag is a subset of the NaA flag used to describe content that is so illegible or unintelligible that you cannot tell whether it is an attempt to answer a question or not. Qualifying posts cannot be improved by you, or the community, and the likelihood of the author being able to turn it into something useful is nonexistent. The only difference between a VLQ flag and an NaA flag here is that, if marked helpful, it adds a downvote from the community user (this can only happen once per post).

If you think that the post could be improved by you, the community, or the author, no matter how remote that possibility, don't flag it.

Flags are neither a substitute for delete votes, nor a tool to be used to bring posts to the attention of other users with the intent that they cast delete votes. You should be operating under the assumption that any post you flag (excluding close flags) will end up in front of a moderator. The fact that the post may or may not be seen in a non-moderator queue is irrelevant when considering whether or not to flag, and nothing more than a helpful side-effect if it does happen.

In the LQPRQ, you should be reviewing posts based on whether or not you think they should have been flagged or not. It makes no difference that you have delete votes or not. If the post should be downvoted and delete voted, but not flagged, then you should choose "looks ok". People in the LQPRQ tend to be fairly trigger happy with deletion, but that isn't a good thing. If your post was in the LQPRQ, wouldn't you want due-process?

Of course you can review or flag however you please, but if you review incorrectly too often then you're going to end up with a review ban, and if you flag incorrectly too often then you're going to end up with a flag ban.

So in summary: be careful, ask yourself whether the post really deserves a flag, or if you're just using it as a super-downvote. Ask yourself if the post could possibly be improved by anyone (including the author), or if it should just be deleted immediately by a diamond moderator, because that is what you're asking for when you flag as VLQ.

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    So... in summary: VLQ flags should never be used, except when you don't trust moderators to know that "abusive" includes "gibberish"? – John Dvorak Jan 15 '16 at 19:25
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    Abusive does not include gibberish. Abusive includes abusive language. The VLQ flag is for gibberish. – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 19:26
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    No. That's just plain false. Ask Shog9. – John Dvorak Jan 15 '16 at 19:28
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    Shog has said that it is not unacceptable to use the abusive flag for gibberish if you have enough users doing so to get it over the automatic deletion threshold. If it's just you flagging as abusive, expect a declined flag. Also, that guidance is a recent addition, and not actually documented anywhere, so you shouldn't rely on it. – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 19:30
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    ... link? Surely users aren't expected to rely on coordinated efforts through a medium they might not even know exists, and surely developers aren't encouraging to game the system to do stuff moderators would never approve of? – John Dvorak Jan 15 '16 at 19:33
  • It is only not disallowed to be used that way because of the automatic deletion threshold. I don't have the link right now, but common sense dictates that gibberish isn't abusive language, and the only reason why it might be remotely not unacceptable is because of the automatic deletion threshold. – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 19:34
  • Hell, even if I'm sitting in the Tavern (I don't anymore) and Smokey posts something, am I supposed to ask how many people are active before i know how to plag a post that clearly needs deleting? – John Dvorak Jan 15 '16 at 19:35
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    Eh... no. "abusive" includes abuse of the system. Shog said so. Otherwise the wording would have stayed at "offensive". – John Dvorak Jan 15 '16 at 19:36
  • I don't know how you can "plag" a post :P, but ultimately it is up to you to take the risk of a declined flag if you want to flag such content as abusive. I would much rather stick to the tried and true VLQ flag, which was the original flag for such content. – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 19:40
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Once a Very Low Quality flag gets to a moderator (whether via review queue or not), you're asking a moderator to take one of the two following actions:

  • Delete the post
  • Decline the flag

It used to be that these posts were sent directly to moderators when someone flagged the post as Very Low Quality (VLQ), now it's when the post has been flagged but not cleared in the review queue.

We still only have two reasonable options (the same ones I listed above).

If a post is in the Review Queue as Very Low Quality, you have three options inside the queue:

  • Edit
  • Clear
  • Flag

You have more options if you visit the post directly:

  • Vote
  • Edit
  • Vote to Close

So, while you have 6 options in dealing with a post initially flagged as VLQ, we only have two.

There are three reasons a post that has been flagged as VLQ makes it to moderators:

  • It is legitimately VLQ, and the moderator should delete it.
  • The post hasn't been cleared out of the review queue in time, and still has pending VLQ flags on it (it may or may not be VLQ).
  • someone phoned it in that day in the review queue and blindly processed flags a VLQ even if they reasonably aren't VLQ.

So, while you may flag a question as VLQ (or process a flag in the queue as VLQ) that's far different from what we see at the end of the day, and it doesn't always mean that something that's made it through the queue is worthy of direct moderator action. As I've listed above, that's really only the case (at best) 50% of the time, everything else being equal.

With that diatribe out of the way, let's get down to your specific questions:

Aren't VLQ flags and the corresponding LQP queue precisely the way that the community makes those decisions?

In addition to voting, editing posts, and voting to close posts.

Why?

Abstractions, my dear. Abstractions.

It would be obviously unhelpful if the majority of the site's close flags ended up in front of diamond moderators, so why do we have that system for VLQ votes? How are users with deletion privileges supposed to reach the number of delete votes required to nuke a post without bothering the mods if the tools they have to bring deletion-worthy posts to each others' attention bother the mods as a side effect?

before you get a chance to delete, a post must first be closed.

VLQ flags aren't presented in the privileges section or Jeff Atwood's post about VLQ flags that's linked to from the privileges section or the text of the flagging dialog itself as involving diamond moderators in any way whatsoever. As far as I can tell there no way at all for a non-Meta-reading user to ever discover that diamond mods have any part to play in their handling. Surely we can communicate about this better, by which I mean at all?

We are, right now. I'd be surprised if anyone who works through the review queue has no idea (or doesn't visit) meta. If you're committed enough to participate in the cleanup of this site, meta would be the natural place to go (there may be one or two, but because of the nature of my assertion, no one who ever replies to this post will be one of those people).

The current system we have is that the site seemingly tells users "hey, here's a nifty tool you can use to clean up garbage content without bothering the moderators", and then those users get their flags declined with what seem to be meaningless generic decline reasons and the mods are routinely posting on Meta complaining about VLQ flags that 99% of VLQ flaggers probably never wanted mods involved with in the first place. Wouldn't this be solved, or at least heavily mitigated, by telling ordinary, non-Meta-visiting users how VLQ flags work?

If you didn't want a Very Low Quality post to ever be seen by a moderator, but to be summarily deleted without being closed or edited, why flag it as very low quality?

If you flag a post as VLQ, you're asking that it be deleted. It is not able to be rehabilitated. If you are on the receiving end of a VLQ flag; wouldn't you want it to be handled with due process?

Given that we're supposed to be super-cautious about raising VLQ flags on only the most extreme garbage, does it follow that we should use the same standard when reviewing posts in the LQP queue?

LQP queue should be an automatic affair about 20% of the time. Either the post is utter crap and can't be salvaged, or is so mistakenly flagged that it should be cleared out of the queue immediately. The other 80% will fall somewhere in between; and require voting or editing, or voting to close -- things that aren't quite as easy to do inside the queue.

Should we be choosing "Looks OK" for pretty much everything? If not, shouldn't there be two different levels of VLQ flag, or shouldn't we be removing mods from this process entirely?

There is no fully automatic system; even the LQP queue requires your judgment and actual work on your part when you review posts. If everyone wants moderation to be a push-button affair or delegated to the 12 elected moderators, then we'll always be where we are now. 80% of the time, getting your hands dirty by editing, voting, or voting to close is the real way to improve the site, not by pushing buttons.

It seems obviously perverse to have a system in which I can flag something as VLQ, and then, based upon undocumented factors out of my control, it will get handled by one of two completely separate groups with completely different standards; why not let me choose?

The queue doesn't exist for you alone; it also exists to give people whose posts are flagged attention from the wider community, maybe that some will guide or help them make their post better. No automatic system does that as well as good old fashioned human intervention.

What the heck is even garbagey enough to justify a VLQ flag, anyway, while simultaneously not counting as either Spam or NAA? I gave up on VLQ flagging early in my time on Stack Overflow because my VLQ flags were all (and I think I literally mean "all") just getting declined without explanation. While mods are heavy on emphasising just how very very garbagey a post must be to merit a VLQ flag (yet again, George's post is a good example), I've never seen anyone exhibit a single example of a post that merited a VLQ flag that wouldn't've merited an NAA or Spam flag. An example or two would help me, and perhaps others, finally understand what this feature is for.

Very Low Quality: This post is considered unreconcilable garbage by all who visit it; and cannot be improved in editing; closing it is also a waste of time. The only viable course of action is for a diamond moderator to nuke it from orbit.

Spam: This post is a commercial advertisement without disclosure and quite possibly has no relevance to the question asked.

Not an Answer: This answer is not an answer; it was supposed to be a comment, or it's another question, or it's just not relevant to anything, anywhere.

Those are three distinct categories of posts.

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    "Those are three distinct categories of posts." you claim, but, as I asked in the question, can you exhibit an example of an answer that is clearly VLQ but is not NAA? So far I've never seen anyone manage to do so, on this post or elsewhere, and the other two answerers here (including Brad) are of the opinion that no such answer exists. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:18
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    "voting, editing posts, and voting to close posts." - are not means by which to coordinate on deleting posts; VLQ flags remain our only tool for that. I don't see the relevance of votes/edits/closes to my point, here. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:20
  • "If you didn't want a Very Low Quality post to ever be seen by a moderator, but to be summarily deleted without being closed or edited, why flag it as very low quality?" - because that's the only means available to try and have the post deleted. All I can do otherwise is place a single delete vote, and most users can't do that. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:22
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    "If you are on the receiving end of a VLQ flag; wouldn't you want it to be handled with due process?" - yes, but that needn't involve moderators. Close flags don't. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:22
  • "We are, right now. I'd be surprised if anyone who works through the review queue has no idea (or doesn't visit) meta." - I visit the queue occasionally and am a fairly regular Meta visitor, but only realised mods were involved in VLQ flags recently. The generic decline message admittedly does indicate this, but I assumed it was just a nonsensical default message or that it was referring to all reviewers as 'moderators'. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:25
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    "80% of the time, getting your hands dirty by editing, voting, or voting to close is the real way to improve the site, not by pushing buttons." - you could just as easily make the same complaint about close voters and their pointless "pushing buttons", back in the days that close votes went to the mods. You give no explanation here for why you think deletion and closure should be handled differently. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:27
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    "The queue doesn't exist for you alone; it also exists to give people whose posts are flagged attention from the wider community, maybe that some will guide or help them make their post better. No automatic system does that as well as good old fashioned human intervention." - so why have a system that stops a large fraction of the flags being handled by the queue? I don't see how thoughtful human intervention is valuable can possibly imply the right solution is a non-human-controlled system that arbitrarily determines one of two possible intervention types, which is what we have now. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 15:30
  • @MarkAmery You realize that for an answer to be VLQ, it also has to be not an answer. I don't see how an answer can be complete gibberish, and still answer the question. The VLQ flag is a step above the NaA flag, I detailed why it is different in my answer. – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 19:29
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    "for an answer to be VLQ, it also has to be not an answer" - I know you and (more tentatively) Brad believe that, but it's not authoritatively confirmed anywhere I've seen, and a lot of this question is about whether or not it's true. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 19:31
  • @MarkAmery this is the best reference I've been able to find for that – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 20:09
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    @TinyGiant doesn't back up your claim at all. NAA and VLQ are roughly the same does not imply VLQ is a subclass of NAA. – Mark Amery Jan 15 '16 at 20:10
  • Saying that it is pretty much the same thing doesn't imply that it is pretty much the same thing? @Mark – user4639281 Jan 15 '16 at 20:11

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