When editing a question, I realise that I should do as much as I can to improve the question to keep the number of edits as small as possible.

If I only have the knowledge or expertise to improve part of the question, should I still contribute that? Or should I wait for a more experienced user to do it all in one go?

Is there a cut-off I can use as a rule of thumb, say only improve the answer if I can cover at least 70% of it...

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    The rule of thumb I keep seeing is improve as much as you can. If you don't know how to reword a question to make it clearer, for example that it's not a duplicate, but the grammar is horrible... Fixing the grammar can be a huge help if you can do that much. It could help someone else improve the question further. – Kendra Jan 13 '16 at 16:23
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    I think that above 2000 rep, small edits are OK, as no-one needs to accept them. – GingerPlusPlus Jan 13 '16 at 16:25
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    @GingerPlusPlus They're less of a problem. The amount that you'd need to improve for it to be worth it is lower. But you can still cause problems with trivial edits as a 2k user, such as by editing a lot of questions all at once if making pointless changes, thus filling the question feed up with question that will just get in the way, or repeatedly bumping the same question with edits that aren't actually improving it meaningfully (whether to intentionally try to get it attention from the question list or not). – Servy Jan 13 '16 at 16:28
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    Sometimes a forgotten "not" can change the complete meaning of a sentence / question / answer. So editing a single word in might help a lot. – hamena314 Jan 13 '16 at 16:30
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    @hamena314 Which is exactly why one should be very careful about making that kind of edit. If the OP is still active on a post like that, it's better to first ask in comments if the "not" was really forgotten, or deliberately left out. – S.L. Barth Jan 13 '16 at 16:31
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    @hamena314 Of course the point there is simply that how much you edit has no real relation to how much of an improvement you're making. You can make one small change and significantly improve (or harm) a post, or you can make dozens of edits all throughout the post and not actually make it notably better. – Servy Jan 13 '16 at 16:32
  • say only improve the answer if I can cover at least 70% of it - you paint a scenario here where apparently you know that 30% of the question is still wrong, but even knowing that you can't do anything about it. Can I ask for an example? In my mind if you can know it is wrong, you can know or find out how to make it right. Are we talking about editing code perhaps? – Gimby Jan 13 '16 at 16:54
  • @Gimby I don't have an example off the top of my head (the question was hypothetical and hopefully useful to future editors too) however I have in the past improved the English of some questions dramatically in a technology I wasn't an expert in, in places it is hard to know whether or not an improvement to the English erases the meaning with regard to the technology. – Troyseph Jan 13 '16 at 17:11
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    @Troyseph so as a concrete example that would be fixing terminology / technical lingo. You can have a good grasp on English, but you can still mess up the terminology if you're not careful. – Gimby Jan 13 '16 at 17:17
  • @Gimby precisely, as one example. – Troyseph Jan 13 '16 at 17:50
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    If the question is off-topic, and your edit does not make it on-topic, don't edit it please. This is especially important if the question is already closed, as the first edit after a question is closed within five days of closure pushes the question into the reopen queue, and this only happens once, so if your edit doesn't make the question on-topic then you're robbing the author of the best chance they'll ever have to get their question reopened. – Tiny Giant Jan 13 '16 at 23:12
  • Absolutely Yes! – ouflak Jan 15 '16 at 14:40
  • @TinyGiant If an answer was off topic, is editing it to make it on topic really a good idea? I mean, you're basically changing the whole meaning of the question if you do. I thought the general consensus here was that if a question is not salvageable, don't try to. – Mr Lister Jan 15 '16 at 14:43
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    That's the caveat. Anyone can edit any off-topic question to be on-topic by replacing the question with another question. The trick is to be able to make it on-topic without changing the original intent of the question. Some questions are rife with opinion based wording, but ultimately boild down to "How do I do X" once all of that wording is removed. @MrLister – Tiny Giant Jan 15 '16 at 16:18
up vote 32 down vote accepted

There is no hard cut-off. Nor should we want one.

Sometimes, a small edit is all that is really needed. Other times, a post needs a lot of editing.

It's always a bit of a judgment call what you should edit. If you're unsure about a part of a post, it's best to leave it alone. But that doesn't keep you from fixing the rest.

Note that edits have an "Edit summary", for the benefit of reviewers and those looking at the edit history. If you don't have full edit privileges, and you've deliberately left part of a post untouched, you might want to point that out in the edit summary. This communicates to the reviewers that you're not being lazy, just being careful.

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    ... and it might inspire one of them to "Accept & Edit", if your edit (or even your summary) was slightly helpful. – Deduplicator Jan 13 '16 at 17:08
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    But I would strongly suggest - given <2000 rep needs approving, don't bother for minor typo fixing. – Sobrique Jan 15 '16 at 9:40
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    Indeed, don't go on some minor edit spree (for common example: tag changes, tag burnination etc) unless you have edit privileges! Otherwise 5 other people needs to approve every minor edit and it just creates large amounts of work for everyone, for very little gained. – Lundin Jan 15 '16 at 14:59

I feel like this comment from Tiny Giant is important enough to call out as a partial answer:

If the question is off-topic, and your edit does not make it on-topic, don't edit it please. This is especially important if the question is already closed, as the first edit after a question is closed within five days of closure pushes the question into the reopen queue, and this only happens once, so if your edit doesn't make the question on-topic then you're robbing the author of the best chance they'll ever have to get their question reopened.

It calls out a part of the system that I was unaware of how it functions. A couple of times I have edited questions that needed grammar and spelling adjustments, only to find that the question was later closed as off topic. I would go along with some other comments I've seen around such activity and agree with the general consensus, "Don't bother polishing turds."

I focus on the tags a lot. Not sure if that's in OP's scope, but it is a "small" change. But seems important enough to remove or add even just one tag.

As for text changes, seems how important is better question than how much. If any change improves question it's probably worth it. The "expert" may never come around to get them all at once.

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    As Deduplicator says in another comment, you can't really go wrong as probably the two most common outcomes of a tag-only edit is that it is accepted, or accepted but improved upon. Consider also looking at the question titles to see if the mistake in the tags is also reflected there. As an example, a question about javascript having "java" as a tag often also has something like "java script" in the title. – Gimby Jan 13 '16 at 21:06

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