-10

Take this question for example: How do I tokenize a string in C++?

This question and its accepted answer are both from September 2008.

While it is a prefectly written and useful question/answer, the truth is it's not particularly interesting, nor does it address a complex problem or rich discussion.

It is just a very simple entry-level question, and the only reason it continues to ve upvoted (and giving reputation to their owners) is because it was asked first, nothing more.

To me, it seems a little unfair that this old questions act as "reputation long-term investments" (+7 years in this example) for their owners. Shouln't they be protected from being upvoted after a long period of time has passed? (something like automatic upgrading to community ownership).

Thanks!

  • 8
    Hmm, no, it gets votes because three hundred thousand programmers looked at it. 0.08% of them are easily impressed, you belong to the 99.92% majority that went meh. Don't expect major rule changes for such an insignificant "problem". – Hans Passant Dec 27 '15 at 21:15
  • 2
    I see your point but the issue isn't that big. To use your example, the maximum number of reputation points Bill The Lizard could have gained from the question is 1340 points; in reality it's going to have been much less because of the daily reputation cap. Most veteran users who started early have a couple of those easy, highly upvoted questions but I don't think they form a significant portion of the reputation total for any of them. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Dec 27 '15 at 21:17
  • @rene haha, no, not jealous :P I used unfair because SO has basically a gamification system embedded. – jotadepicas Dec 27 '15 at 21:19
14

While it is a perfectly written and useful question/answer, the truth is it's not particularly interesting, nor does it address a complex problem or rich discussion.

We like perfectly written and useful questions and answers. Well-written questions are easy to find via search engines. Good answers that are still useful several years after they are written are one of the main reasons for this site to exist.

To me, it seems a little unfair that this old questions act as "reputation long-term investments" (+7 years in this example) for their owners.

What's unfair about it? Are there not thousands of questions being asked every day that we can still answer? Won't some of them be long term investments for people answering today? To me, it seems perfectly fair that people who took the time to help seed the site with good content should still be getting a few stray upvotes if their answers are still useful.


Edit: Bias noted, now that I click through the link and see that was one of my old questions. After looking through my recent reputation changes, it looks like I'm getting about three upvotes per month on that question. I doubt I would notice if that spigot were turned off.

  • I was thinking about something similar to the copyright expiration: copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm – jotadepicas Dec 27 '15 at 21:21
  • comment after your edit: precisely, so why not releasing it to the "public domain"? – jotadepicas Dec 27 '15 at 21:23
  • @jotadepicas Copyright has a specific purpose that I see lacking here. People are already free to use that question and its answers. There's no real reason for reputation gains to expire. – Bill the Lizard Dec 27 '15 at 21:23
  • What he probably means is Community Wiki. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Dec 27 '15 at 21:26
  • @Pekka웃 yes, I'm aware of community wikis, but I'm not sure about the implications of automatically upgrading all very old questions with high vote count to that. But yes, could be. – jotadepicas Dec 27 '15 at 21:27
  • @BilltheLizard I used the copyright as an example, just inspired by it. I didn't mean literal copyright, I know about the questions being free and all that. I was addressing the point that if even non-free content has a time limit to profit from, why not free content as well ("profit" being reputation gains, it's just an analogy). – jotadepicas Dec 27 '15 at 21:33
  • 3
    @jotadepicas Yes, I understand you. You keep saying "why not?" but you haven't answered "why?" – Bill the Lizard Dec 27 '15 at 21:34

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .