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this question has been edited twice ( 3-1 , 3-1 rejection ) and requested that the const qualifier is removed from me1() and me2() such that the mutex is actually lockable; then suggested to make the mutex mutable. It has been rejected twice, even though it is standard practice. The piece of code displayed actually expects the mutex to be lockable.

This makes me wonder if those reviewing are actually capable of reviewing for any language ( I know I am not ). I noticed that all reviewers that rejected are not c++ active.

Should the review, for e.g. C++ tagged , questions be directed to users that have been active in the respective tag?

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    Also, the usual advice for changing code in questions, or changing code in answers significantly, is to first clearly comment the reason the change is needed, then make a suggestion some time later (hopefully after there's been an opportunity to confirm or refute your note) and refer to the comment in your edit summary. You ... sort of did that. It wasn't very clear, though. In general, it's safest to allow answerers to address these sorts of silly errors in their answers on the side, although if you know for certain it doesn't affect the primary issue, an edit is also legitimate. – Nathan Tuggy Dec 27 '15 at 8:00
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    Since code shown in a question can be the exact reason for the question being asked it is the wrong thing to do to attempt to change it. A new questioner is always going to be still active on the site (even if not really responding) so if you think it just a typo, for instance, just comment on it or mention it in your answer, No to your question, the review queue would be blocked by edits on low-traffic tags and since code should only be rarely changed, what would be the point? – Bill Woodger Dec 27 '15 at 9:12
  • @NathanTuggy, I think I did what you say. – g24l Dec 27 '15 at 11:36
  • @BillWoodger, reading the question any human being deducts that the op believes this codes compiles, and his question is not about if it compiles. That is not the case here. – g24l Dec 27 '15 at 11:37