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These are the standard off-topic reasons as of December 2015:

  1. Questions on professional server- or networking-related infrastructure administration are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve programming or programming tools. You may be able to get help on Server Fault.
  2. Questions about general computing hardware and software are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve tools used primarily for programming. You may be able to get help on Super User.
  3. Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.
  4. Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it.
  5. This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting.

The first two reasons could use some rework, as they have evolved to become less relevant over time.

The Stack Exchange network has grown far beyond the triplet of Stack Overflow, Server Fault, and Super User. With dozens of sites related to computing, there is no longer reason to limit our recommendations to just Server Fault and Super User. Ask Ubuntu, Database Administrators, WordPress Development, and Raspberry Pi are some examples of good places to ask relevant computing questions that are unsuitable for Stack Overflow.

In light of the diversity of computing-related sites now available on Stack Exchange, singling out Server Fault as a recommendation feels like an anachronism. It is, in fact, the least-used of the five reasons.

I think that our users could be better served by not having such specific, limited site recommendations in the standard closure reasons. How can we improve these standard reasons?

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I propose merging reasons (1) and (2) as:

This question does not involve programming or tools used primarily for programming. Questions about general computing hardware and software may be appropriate on another Stack Exchange site.

Alternatively, the link can point to a Meta post, similar to this one, where we provide better guidance.

Naturally, corresponding enhancements should be made to the Help Center.

  • 1
    What to do with the freed-up slot? Here is a proposal. – 200_success Dec 23 '15 at 13:10
  • Alternative #1: The link could point to a dedicated page under StackExchange with a listing of computing-related sites and a description of what is appropriate on each. – Euro Micelli Dec 25 '15 at 1:43
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    Alternative #2: if we want a community-curated list, the link could point to a meta post with an answer for each computing-related sites and a description of what is appropriate on each. – Euro Micelli Dec 25 '15 at 1:45

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