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I wrote a very long answer to a question. This answer is divided into multiple sections. I would like to be able to link to individual sections rather than send people to the post to fish around for a particular section. In html, this is done by adding anchors to the page. This is not presently allowed at SO, and I would request that it be introduced as a feature: namely, that we can use anchors to create links to particular sections (lines) of questions and answers on Stack Overflow.

Relevant questions

Note this has come up twice before:

Neither has an accepted answer. The previous iterations of the question had idiosyncratic features that got people sidetracked. E.g., one answer suggested to just reorder the content, putting the most important stuff first, as if that would solve the problem. For a long, logically ordered, answer, this suggestion would not work.

Another person suggested to break up an answer into multiple answers, each of which already has its own link on SO. There are all sorts of problems with this. Different answers are meant to be different answers, not serve as paragraph breaks: especially if the order of the parts is important, breaking things up into different answers would not make sense as we have no control over their order. That is controlled by votes.

One answer said that only only one bookmark hash is allowed per url, and insinuated that this is a fatal problem with the suggestion. This seems something that would be trivial to overcome: just allow different names for different anchors within a question or answer. What is so fatal about that?

In general, it seems strange that SO posts seem to not have a natural way to link to particular places in questions and answers. It's like taking one of the cool features of the internet, and killing it. Why? This seems a natural and useful feature for longer questions and answers.

Note we explicitly discussed whether to ask this question here. A second post says that in such a case it is best to simply ask a new question when the original doesn't have a satisfactory answer.

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    That's not an answer, it's a blog post. – user4639281 Dec 17 '15 at 2:44
  • @Braiam yes I discussed that in detail in my post, explaining why I am reasking, and linked to an explicit discussion of that: the two times it has been asked the answers are not accepted or very good (for reasons I outlined explicitly already in my post). – eric Dec 17 '15 at 2:48
  • Incidentally, I was trying to make this a feature request, not a question...I will edit to make it more clear. I probably did it wrong as it is my first time making a feature request, but please dont' remove that tag it was my main goal. I know the answer to my question, I want to get a vote on the feature request. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 3:21
  • @neuronet You posted a question asking if its possible. That's not a feature request. If you want to post a feature request you need to actually request a feature, at least at a minimum. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 13:57
  • @Servy I was explicit about this, so not sure what you are saying. From my post: "This is not presently allowed at SO, and I would request that it be introduced as a feature: namely, that we can use anchors to create links to particular sections (lines) of questions and answers on Stack Overflow." – eric Dec 17 '15 at 14:04
  • @neuronet No, you asked if it was possible, got an answer, and then edited that line into the question, to completely change what you're asking. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 14:08
  • @Servy I edited to clarify my original intent. I originally had the feature request tag that you removed, so maybe you could have asked for clarification instead of editing: I edited it to make it more clear, as it was already pretty clear from the first two posts it wasn't possible. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 14:15
  • @neuronet And yet you asked if it was possible anyway, you didn't request that it be added. I have no idea why you asked if it was possible if you already knew that it wasn't, but you choose to do so anyway. I removed the tag because you posted a question asking if it was possible; you didn't request a feature, so the feature request tag makes no sense. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 14:43
  • @Servy I clarified the Q b/c I realized it was not clear when you removed the tag, that there was ambiguity. My intent was always to request this feature, hence the feature request tag I put in originally, that you removed! Then today you are asking about the original question, as if I didn't already clarify it. Not sure why, there was no attempt at trickery here, I truly just want this feature. Maybe b/c you feel you answered the question and then I changed it? I changed it because I realized you misunderstood my intent, when you edited my Q to fit your answer! lol This is very funny. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 16:58
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    Why has this discussion been abandoned? Is there a technical limitation that prevent this from being implemented? I mean, that would be great to have a more flexible way of sharing answers. It may be nice to be able to point a detail inside an answer (a line of code, a code block, a section, etc.). – cglacet Mar 11 at 10:10
  • @cglacet as time goes on, and the number of multipart answers increases, it is clear this would be a good feature. Lots of benefits very little downside. Pedantry notwithstanding. – eric Apr 22 at 2:52
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Clearly the question is just too broad, if it necessitates an answer that's that long. SO answers shouldn't be this long in the first place.

But to answer your question, you cannot create anchors within a post.

  • The question is not broad, it is simple and specific, but for Python users giving an answer turns out to be a lot to it because it is about how the binding works under the hood. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 2:51
  • @neuronet Either the information is important to answering the question, and thus the question is way too broad, or the vast majority of that answer is entirely off topic, and should be removed. Either way, something is very wrong when there's an answer that's that long. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 2:51
  • I would suggest it is impossible (and superficial) to say the answer or question is bad just by virtue of the length of the answer. There are lots of questions, and answers, that it would be useful to have links within. E.g., stackoverflow.com/a/1022743/1886357, stackoverflow.com/questions/1362687/…. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 2:59
  • @neuronet Both of those questions are completely off topic for the site, and have no business being on SO at all. Given that the definition of the Too Broad close reason is that the question cannot be answered within an appropriate length, I can say that if there is an answer that's that long then either the question is too broad, or the answer has lots of superfluous information. SO answers really aren't supposed to be that long. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 3:01
  • perhaps bad examples, but at any rate it seems the post under question is not like that. It is a specific question about Qt for Python, and a detailed answer. Maybe for some it is overkill (hence, the tl;dr), but for the original questionier (i.e., me) it was exactly what I was after. There can be, and are, longer answers (and questions) at SO (or meta-SO). I appreciate longer answers that take the time to explain things, rather than code snippets and cryptic explanations. This is a stylistic preference, not something objective that you can use to say X is bad because of length. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 3:05
  • @neuronet The fact that you wanted to ask a question that is too broad, and post an answer that's not of an appropriate scope for an SO answer, in no way changes the fact that the question is too broad, or that the answer isn't of an appropriate scope for an SO answer. if you want to just post blog posts/articles, that's fine, SO just isn't the place to do it. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 3:07
  • @neuronet [...] to say X is bad because of length. It's not necessarily bad, it just doesn't belong on SO. SO isn't a site for posting long form articles about entire subjects. It's a place for specific, narrowly scoped questions. There are other places where the content you want to post is appropriate, and you can feel free to post such content there. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 3:09
  • that is not a broad question: it is a focused question about the default delegate used by Qt views.. So the problem isn't the question, though it could be the answer. Do you have a link to where SO explicitly prohibits, discourages longer answers? Is there something wrong with an answer being relatively comprehensive? Someone else could answer it and make a nice pithy answer, and it will get voted up if people prefer that. At least is my understanding, though maybe I missed the memo, but this seems like stylistic attack not substantive. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 3:13
  • Let us continue this discussion in chat. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 3:27
  • @neuronet Feel free to look through the help center yourself if you want to see some of the guidelines on scope. You're supposed to have already read it (you're not allowed to ask a question until you've have indicate that you have) but it seems that you haven't. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 4:13
  • I'm familiar with that. I gave a two-line answer that is actually correct. I also gave more detail, to help someone who might want more detail. Nothing against that in the guidelines. You are cherry picking. I am going based on lines like "Brevity is acceptable, but fuller explanations are better" that are also in the guidelines. I attempt to give fuller explanations of things. Focusing on character number seems stylistic pedantry, not substance. Indeed, there is a character limit, right, that embodies the strict limits? I'm not even halfway there in my answer. So there's that. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 4:32
  • @neuronet Length is not stylistic. The formatting of the text is something that's stylistic. The scope of the content covered is in no way stylistic, it's substance. You're trying to write a book, when the help center specifically said that you shouldn't be writing a book for an answer. If you want to write books for answers that's fine, SO just isn't the place to do it. There are lots of other places where it is fine. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 13:56
  • focusing on length is not focusing on content. You have said nothing about the content, and are repeating yourself now, haven't really addressed my previous claim. I gave the tl;dr for people who want that, and a longer version for those who want more explanation. This is accepted practice, and you have given zero substantive critique of the substance of my answer, other than repeating what you think about long answers. – eric Dec 17 '15 at 14:05
  • @neuronet The scope of the post is an aspect of the content of the post. Or are you saying that two posts discussing the same topic, but with radically different scopes, have exactly the same content? The scope of a post is highly relevant; discussing the technical accuracy of the statements is not the only possible criticism that can be made of a post. – Servy Dec 17 '15 at 14:10
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    Your logic doesn't seems right to me. A very short and precise question may need a long/broad/detailed/reasoned answer. For example this question: how to execute two “aggregate” functions (like sum) concurrently, feeding them from the same iterator has a very long answer: comparing different solutions' performances. I wouldn't call that noise, I personally think it's a very good answer, it has everything you need to understand your options. An answer is sometime long because the problem is hard. – cglacet Mar 12 at 13:35

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