-4

In a scenario where the question owner aks a 'hard-to-solve' or badly asked question, the amount of views and answers will be most likely very low. In the last case, the chance that one of the answers (or more likely: the only answer) gets more than two upvotes is very low. So the bounty won't be auto-awarded.

If you do not award your bounty within 7 days (plus the grace period), the highest voted answer created after the bounty started with a minimum score of 2 will be awarded half the bounty amount. If two or more eligible answers have the same score (i.e., their scores are tied), the oldest answer is awarded the bounty. If there's no answer meeting those criteria, the bounty is not awarded to anyone.

But what if the question owner accepts an answer after the bounty period that was posted before the expiration and hasn't been edited since. (Example: the question owner doesn't login or is to lazy to accept the answer the first time.)

It seems fair to me that this answer will still get the bounty, even though it has already expired. In the case of a badly asked question it might have even been harder to solve than 'normal' questions.

If the bounty was started by the question owner, and the question owner accepts an answer posted during the bounty period, and the bounty expires without an explicit award then we assume the bounty owner liked the answer they accepted and award it the full bounty amount at the time of bounty expiration.

Source: Reputation & Moderation

  • 1
    You get over it and move on. – user4639281 Dec 5 '15 at 1:39
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That's the whole point of having a specific period of time for bounties: they expire. Once they're gone, they're gone.

Let it go.

  • I do understand how bounties work, but I was asking what will happen if the answer was posted within this specific period, doesn't receive enough reputation, and then gets accepted even though it hasn't been changed since it was posted. – Berendschot Dec 5 '15 at 8:26

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