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In the review queues, include explanation about what happens when you fail an audit. I found this answer - if it is accurate, please include it into the review page itself: Got review banned for one failed audit; I acted on the post but not in the way that it would expect

After failing a (bad) audit, I was very upset, since I didn't know what would happen if I failed another: Lose all my reputation? Get banned from the entire site?

Besides, include the necessary stats to estimate the "danger" of getting banned:

  • Number of failed audits within the last 30 days
  • Duration of the (possible) ban

EDIT after Marco Bonelli's answer:

Three arguments against that:

  • I think, Stack Overflow should be transparent, i.e. not hiding what's happening behind the scenes.
  • As I reported earlier today, the Triage isn't explained on the corresponding privilege page: Bug: Triage not explained in “Access Review Queues” privilege How can I be sure that it had not just been forgotten on that reputation page too?
  • If (as you say) the information is available anyway, why hide it somewhere in the help section, instead of answering it right away?

My ultimate argument is: If you don't trust me, you shouldn't give me the review privilege in the first place. What's the point of the entire reputation system if you think that people do their work thoroughly, only because they fear an uncertain consequence?

Compromise: give clear information that failing audits doesn't cost you reputation and failing repeatedly will cause a temporary ban from reviewing. That's certainly better than nothing.

EDIT after more discussion and downvotes:

All I'm suggesting is to make the system more transparent and usable by proactively revealing an information which is publicly available anyway (namely how the banning system works exactly).

Using a sheet of paper and a pencil in front of their computer, any of those "bad guys" (or robot) you are fearing about can easily keep track of their personal statistics and the "banning-danger" themselves anyway. So what's the point in hiding this from the "good guys" too?

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    I'm afraid the consequences are a little worse than that, if you take a look out your window can you see a black van parked across the street? – PeterJ Dec 3 '15 at 12:18
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    @PeterJ Look up, there's a black helicopter up there too ! :) – Paulie_D Dec 3 '15 at 13:31
  • Not to mention you didn't notice the satchel charge that was strapped to your computer. – Magisch Dec 3 '15 at 14:57
  • I don't think this is about "good" vs "bad" guys as much as it is about "robo"/"auto" reviewers. The audits are supposed to stop people from clicking through queues without paying attention. That's who they don't want seeing the exact numbers. – BSMP Dec 3 '15 at 21:27
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Answer to your original question

So you are basically telling me that it is less wrong to fail an audit if it would cost you a 2 days ban than failing it if it would cost you a more severe ban? Personally, I don't think this is what we should teach to the community.

Imagine the failed audits count being shown on the review queues: what would prevent any user from just clicking "accept, accept, accept, ..." without even reading anything until they find out the counter increased and the text "failing another audit will lead you to a x days ban from the review queue" appears? This is not something that we want to happen at all!

The only thing you need to know when processing a review queue is that it will not affect your reputation, as we know from the relative page in the help center, where it's said that:

You lose reputation when:

  • your question is voted down: −2
  • your answer is voted down: −2
  • you vote down an answer: −1
  • you place a bounty on a question: − full bounty amount
  • one of your posts receives 6 spam or offensive flags: −100

but it will result in other countermeasures if you don't work wisely.


Additional answers

You have 8k+ reputation. If you imagine (because you cannot know it for sure) that failing your second audit would cost you 4k rep, would you continue reviewing?

I would ask myself: "what can happen if I fail one or more audits? Could I lose my reputation?", and search for the relative topic here on Meta, finding the answer in the multiplicity of already solved questions about it.

I think Stack Overflow should be transparent, i.e. not hiding what's happening behind the scenes.

I agree with you on this point, however what you are offering here is not a solution for this issue. You should open a different or question about it suggesting to add the relative pages in the help section of the site.

As I reported earlier today, the Triage isn't explained on the corresponding privilege page: Bug: Triage not explained in “Access Review Queues” privilege. How can I be sure that it had not just been forgotten on that reputation page too?

If (as you say) the information is available anyway, why hide it somewhere in the help section, instead of answering it right away?

This may also be interpreted as a lack of transparency (even though review queues are explained in their own pages when reviewing), but again: you should do what I said above.

If you don't trust me, you shouldn't give me the review privilege in the first place. What's the point of the entire reputation system if you think that people do their work thoroughly, only because they fear an uncertain consequence?

This question is just nonsensical. We live in the real world where people don't always behave according to their social/reputational level. What's the point of electing someone as Prime Minister if their subsequent behavior is unethical? This happens everyday and we still keep electing Prime Ministers all over the world, why in heaven's name? Most of the people who achieved privileges based on their reputation actually deserve them, but there will always be someone who just doesn't care or abuses his authority.

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Audits are not entirely about trying to ban reviewers because they are also meant to educate new reviewers to that review queue. Focusing entirely on the ban aspect of audits misrepresents what they are trying to accomplish.

From the MSE audit FAQ:

The test (known as a review audit) is designed to help new reviewers hone their moderation skills, while nudging more experienced users that don't seem to be paying close attention to what they're reviewing.

As for your fears of the consequences of failing audits, I do agree that the penalties for failing audits aren't explicitly stated. But I don't think it's reasonable to assume "Lose all my reputation? Get banned from the entire site?" for failing an audit. The first time people fail an audit is probably a surprise, but the "STOP! Look and listen" message is usually helpful in explaining the thought process for reviewing things in that review queue.

Finally, I don't like the idea of showing how many more audits you can fail before getting review banned. That would make it even easier for robo-reviewers to game the review system. If it estimates you can fail 2 more audits before being banned, why not just click "Approve" on everything until you fail another audit. After all, you had an "audit to give."

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    Actually its well known when and how exactly the audit system works and what it does. See my answer. – Magisch Dec 3 '15 at 14:46
  • @Magisch I'd argue with "well-known" but point taken. I still think this is a bad feature request because it is at odds with the high-level view of what audits are. They are not solely about punishment, but also education. – ryanyuyu Dec 3 '15 at 14:59
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    With the random selection of those and again re-visiting the few I've failed so far I can't say that. They might be well intentioned and necessary, but they've made me not want to review things so as to not face another set of bogus audits and then get banned again for it. – Magisch Dec 3 '15 at 15:00
  • Not wanting to review is about the same as being actually banned from reviewing... – ryanyuyu Dec 3 '15 at 15:01
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    Well then the audit system has done its job a little too well: I would already just review for goodness's sake and the quality of the site. If the site makes janitorial work that difficult on intention (automatically selected review audits are still bogus imo), then they only have themselfes to blame if flags don't get cleared quickly enough. – Magisch Dec 3 '15 at 15:03
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Its already known what happens exactly in terms of review ban.

You are allowed to fail 3 audits in a 30 day period. The 4th failed one will then cause you to get your first ban, 2 days. After that, every further failed audit will cause another review ban, incrementing in lenght. 7days, 30days. This resets when you do not fail any review audits for 30 days. After the 30 day ban naturally the system resets and you will be once again allowed to fail 3 review audits before getting the 2 day ban on your 4th again.

Source: Personal experience and a thorough meta post here.

  • Note that the linked meta post is verifiably wrong in at least one point. See comments. – Nathan Tuggy Dec 4 '15 at 5:30

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