15

In the suggested edits queue, I saw an edit where the user mentioned that they were "trying the edit again" and, from looking at their edit history, I can see that the previous edit was rejected 3-0. Assuming that it's not a clearly essential change, but is something that I'd otherwise accept, should I let the past rejection influence my decision?

I'm inclined to say that it doesn't matter what happened with the edit before, and that I should just judge it on its own merits. But I don't like to encourage the idea that someone can just keep resubmitting an edit until they find reviewers who approve it, regardless of other reviewers rejecting it. It also makes me concerned that I'm overlooking something which earlier reviewers noticed.

I'm certainly not going to just blindly reject something solely because it was rejected in the past, but I'm also hesitant to not give any weight to the fact that three other people all voted to reject. That additional consideration could make me change an accept to a skip, or a skip to a reject.

Do I vote how I think the edit deserves, or respect the decision of the earlier reviewers?

  • 7
    The purpose of having multiple reviewers is to come to a consensus, By you ignoring your own opinion and respecting the decision of the earlier reviewers, you aren't helping toward that purpose. – Kevin B Dec 2 '15 at 18:49
  • 2
    @KevinB My concern is that multiple reviewers already came to a consensus. Since there's an element of chance in who the reviewers are, I don't like the idea of someone resubmitting until they happen to get a consensus they agree with. – resueman Dec 2 '15 at 18:51
  • 1
    I would go with approving or rejecting the edit purely on its own merit. However, if three other reviewers rejected it (and why it was rejected may be important), it may not be a good edit anyway, so be wary. And I think you have a valid concern about the reviewer's motives, since the suggested edits queue fairly frequently allows awful edits to get through, and now this user has bothered not three, but six people with this edit suggestion. – Ajean Dec 2 '15 at 18:57
  • 2
    Sure, but... who's to say those previous reviewers weren't robo-reviewing? Each edit suggestion should get reviewed individually, the previous outcome shouldn't be a consideration of how you decide to vote on the edit. – Kevin B Dec 2 '15 at 18:57
  • 1
    it's going to depend at least a bit on context. Are you seeing something that the other reviewers missed? Is it clear that they made a mistaken (and why)? If so, I'd accept, to correct that error. If there is simply a judgement call as to the merits of the edit, then I'd be inclined to reject, for exactly the reason you're inclined to, I don't want people just submitting edits over and over until people make the judgement call that they want. – Servy Dec 2 '15 at 19:00
  • 1
    @Servy Those seem like reasonable guidelines for making a decision. The specific case that I saw was a minor code change to an answer. It doesn't change the intent at all, and fixes a potential bug. And it does take some knowledge of the language to see that it doesn't affect the goal of the code. – resueman Dec 2 '15 at 19:08
  • 1
    which gives even more of a reason to cast your vote based on your own expertise rather than looking to the previous reviewers... you don't know whether or not they know that the edit doesn't change the intent, or fixes a bug. – Kevin B Dec 2 '15 at 19:13
  • 1
    Personally, I would reevaluate my decision once just as a sanity check (am I missing something obvious?), but I wouldn't necessarily withhold or change my initial judgment. So basically, I say no. – ryanyuyu Dec 2 '15 at 19:28
11

Judging based on previous reviews and rejections

I would say that, in general, judging an edit based on previous rejections is only consistent if both:

  • The previous edit was reviewed and rejected correctly.
  • The new edit is proposing the same kind of changes (or just a merely revised version of them) which made the previous edit fail the review.

This would mean that the user is only trying to get its edit accepted regardless of its value/utility resubmitting it over and over. In my honest opinion, in this case, the edit should be rejected, and the user should be overseen by inspecting their relative activity page (/users/<id>/user-name?tab=activity&sort=suggestions) to see if this kind of behavior was either sporadic or habitual. Then, in case of recurrent behavior, you should consider to flag the user for moderator attention explaining what's going on. Although this is not an enormous issue, this is no different from farming reputation taking advantage of edge cases in the site mechanics.

Judging the edit purely on its own merit

On the other hand, if either:

  • The previous edit was incorrectly reviewed and rejected.
  • The new edit is proof that the user understood the previous rejection and reworked their changes.

This would mean that the new edit is therefore valid to be reviewed on its own merit. You should then check, like you would do in any other review, its content and its benefits to the post, and judge it accordingly, regardless of the previous rejection by other reviewers.


Now, quoting from your question:

I don't like to encourage the idea that someone can just keep resubmitting an edit until they find reviewers who approve it, regardless of other reviewers rejecting it.

Accepting this kind of edit following the above "guideline", you're not encouraging that idea: you are, instead, making the user understand that to err is uman, and so everyone should be given the chance to mend their mistakes.

I'm certainly not going to just blindly reject something solely because it was rejected in the past, but I'm also hesitant to not give any weight to the fact that three other people all voted to reject.

You're right, maybe three other people all voted to reject, but did those people act correctly? I also am more inclined to, for example, vote to close a question if I see 3-4 other close votes, but, before doing that, I'm going to check why did those people vote and whether their opinions fit mine or not.

Coming to a conclusion

Do I vote how I think the edit deserves, or respect the decision of the earlier reviewers?

First of all, you're not always supposed to cast a vote. The Skip button was put there for a reason. Secondly, there's no universal answer to this question, so try to refer at the above section as much as you can, and if, after that, you still are confused, just don't cast any vote.

5

Consider: Before you've voted to accept or reject the edit, you are not shown how other reviewers have voted. One could argue that this is a good idea or a bad idea, but the clear intent is for each reviewer to form an independent judgment based solely on the content of the edit, rather than looking to previous reviewers for guidance.

So in an unusual case such as this, where you become aware of previous reviewers' judgments before making your own, it seems in the spirit of the process to disregard those judgments.

In particular, if you're worried about an editor spamming an edit over and over again until it happens to get accepted... don't. There's plenty of things that make that an impractical strategy.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .