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If you look at this review you see that my code was edited to suit someone's specific flavor of indentation and code styling.

I disagree with this specific flavor of indentation but worst of all, it doesn't fix anything in my post. Some sentences were rephrased without adding clarification, and in my opinion even removing some clarification.

I'm inclined to reverting the changes back to my own flavor of indentation, perhaps adding some explanation with comments in the code itself, but I was wondering if that would be wrong or if it would anger the person who did the very minor edit to my post.

I want to do a sanity check by asking here on meta, should I revert it or leave it as it is?

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  • 13
    What stops you from rolling back to a revision you want and then applying the changes you liked again yourself? You can always rollback your own question.
    – magisch
    Nov 30 '15 at 8:27
  • A) Sanity check, B) how? I don't see a rollback button or a history button? Nov 30 '15 at 8:27
  • Your original question should have one.
    – magisch
    Nov 30 '15 at 8:29
  • I only see share edit flag and delete as options... Nov 30 '15 at 8:29
  • 18
    There should be a clickable "edited by bla bla" item below your question/answer, if you click that you will see the editing history. And there you'll have the option to rollback to a previous revision. Use the rollback link next to the question state that you want to rollback to.
    – Gimby
    Nov 30 '15 at 8:30
  • 2
    Ah, thanks :-) Learn something new every day. Now I want for my santiy check before I take any action Nov 30 '15 at 8:30
  • 4
    In the revision history, on the revision you want to roll back to, there is a link for rolling back. I rolled back your question to Rev1, btw.
    – magisch
    Nov 30 '15 at 8:31
  • 7
    Upvote for enforcing your style! Yet I have to admit I liked the edited version better...
    – f_puras
    Nov 30 '15 at 12:32
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    In this specific edit, I would not rollback it since the style follows the Java common guidelines. When you are writing code for your own, you can use the style that you like most. But as you are sharing your knowledge with the world, it would be better to follow the guidelines that most people use and are more familiar with.
    – Zanon
    Nov 30 '15 at 12:39
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    @Zanon There is no "common" consensus about the style of the brace placement in the Java world. Some prefer them on the same line, others don't. An edit which just converts this style shouldn't have been accepted. Especially this edit, because it was badly done and had two different styles in the same code block.
    – Tom
    Dec 1 '15 at 15:15
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    @Tom Especially since it was done by a >2k user. It seems to me like either a half-assed edit attempt or an attempt to farm rep.
    – magisch
    Dec 1 '15 at 15:20
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    @Magisch "Especially since it was done by a >2k user" What do you mean with that? That user has around 500 reputation.
    – Tom
    Dec 1 '15 at 15:23
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    @tom obvious fat-finger error/thinko. Should've been "<2k user" Dec 1 '15 at 15:32
  • You can stylize your code in the way that you like, but you should keep it consistent within the post. The post had mixed styles, which may be the reason for the edits. I've just now adjusted the parts that were inconsistent with your apparent style preferences. You're free to change it around how you'd like, of course.
    – Brian
    Dec 1 '15 at 20:56
  • 2
    @Tom The convention of brace-on-same-line is just not quite as strong as property accessor conventions. Both Sun/Oracle's original conventions, widely followed and Google's conventions, influential because of Android are consistent with the editor's formatting. Dec 2 '15 at 5:46
38

As the author you can always edit your own post, including rolling it back, and have a binding vote on edit-suggestions. If someone made inappropriate changes (and as author you have more latitude deciding there), it's your right to roll them back.

To roll back an answer, click in the edit history, find the revision you want to roll back to, and then click the "rollback" link in the upper left corner.

If a rollback war starts (user edits, you roll back, user keeps editing...), try to clear the situation in the comments, or flag for a moderator to handle it (explain what's happening, even though they might be able to see it themselves). They have the tools to resolve it, and the system will notify them if there are lots of rollbacks.

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    You don't have a blanket right to revert changes: Self-vandalism isn't allowed even though you can do it. (Does not apply in this case.) Dec 1 '15 at 18:30
  • @Deduplicator you're also right, you can also edit this into my answer. I made it community wiki now, so everyone can have a go at making it better as they feel fit.
    – magisch
    Dec 2 '15 at 5:42
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It's okay if you have an indentation style of your own that you follow, and in that case, others should generally refrain from editing your code to their preferred style.

However, looking at your original code, you don't appear to have any consistent style. You put some opening braces at the end of the line, others at the start of the next line, without any apparent logic. You put different lines within the same code block at different indentation levels.

If there's some set of style rules you're trying to follow, then please make sure your whole post follows those rules. Otherwise, editing your code to some consistent style, whichever style it is, is perfectly appropriate. You're hoping for others to read your question and help you. Formatting the code makes that easier for them.

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    The edit looks, to my eye at least, to also be inconsistent in placement of the braces. More obviously inconsistent than the original. Dec 1 '15 at 21:01
  • 1
    @ShannonSeverance The editor missed the first two opening braces, which were left at the start of the next line. After that, all opening braces were placed at the end of the line. The original version was start, start, start, start, start, start, end, end, start, start, start, end, end.
    – user743382
    Dec 1 '15 at 21:19

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