18

Recently I came across this meta post

It's about an user that earned a bounty with an answer that obviously did not satisfy the askers' needs.

The ( pretty high upvoted ) accepted answer states, that the answer had indeed some 'value' and also that the "not an answer flag" was declined. However the answer ( I cannot see it ) was deleted by at least 3 members with > 20k reputation.

My question is:

Why was this answer deleted?

Generally I think bad answers should be downvoted. Maybe the decision to delete came only from earning 'not deserved' bounties. But that would need a change in the bounty system itself and not cause deletions of answers that are not against the stack overflow rules.

  • 3
    here is a screenshot of the answer discussed... – rene Nov 29 '15 at 20:49
  • 7
    Meta exposure to a so-so post is usually enough to get it buried. And you're right, it should not have been deleted. I'd assume the voters' intention was to get the earned bounty removed again. "Ill gotten gain", something like that. A mob is never that pretty. – Hans Passant Nov 29 '15 at 20:53
  • This feels more like an example of the meta effect than any general rules/policies. At least that prevented the answerer from getting even more downvotes I guess. – approxiblue Nov 29 '15 at 20:54
  • 1
    the answer had at least +4 as a comment states... I think only "the meta effect" caused that significant downvote – shock_gone_wild Nov 29 '15 at 20:57
  • Maybe it had something to do with the answerer's behavior? – approxiblue Nov 29 '15 at 20:57
  • 21
    Heh, I'm not at all inclined to undelete it. Two of those votes were targeted, and he wouldn't have received that automatic bounty without them. To be completely honest, when we investigate situations like this and determine bounties were awarded through malicious means, we do just delete the answers to retract it when there weren't a lot of other votes on it. Easier than getting someone to go manually delete a bounty award. In the end: cheating to earn a bounty will generally just draw more attention to it, and he got what he rightly deserves - deletion. – animuson Nov 29 '15 at 21:03
  • 2
    So this is a fact, that he cheated with the upvotes? And what about the upvoting users ( and accepted answer) on the corresponding meta question? It could not have been so bad at all ( cheating or not ) – shock_gone_wild Nov 29 '15 at 21:11
  • 2
    @animuson so you would have deleted the answer anyway. That three 20K-ers already went down that route saved you one-click, right? – rene Nov 29 '15 at 21:20
  • 7
    Generally, even if the voting was not fraudulent, if an answer repeats information referenced in the question itself and does not add any new information whatsoever, then it is a bad answer. That in itself does not make it dangerous enough to warrant deletion, a downvote would be more appropriate. However, when a bounty is involved then it does become dangerous as it teaches the user that they can scam bounties like that. The only way to remove the unfairly obtained bounty (for us peasants anyway) is to delete the answer. Thus, the actions taken seem completely justified. – user4639281 Nov 29 '15 at 21:28
  • 1
    @Tiny Giant : Summarizing the essential parts of a link provided in an answer ( to help future readers ) is case to delete ? You should consider the answer without the bounty applied. It's a problem of the bounty mechanism in my oppinion. Not a problem of the answer itself. – shock_gone_wild Nov 29 '15 at 21:33
  • 3
    I actually said that at the beginning of my last comment: "if an answer repeats information referenced in the question itself and does not add any new information whatsoever, then it is a bad answer. That in itself does not make it dangerous enough to warrant deletion, a downvote would be more appropriate. " However, when a large reward is involved, it is a different story. – user4639281 Nov 29 '15 at 21:34
  • 2
    @approxiblue: The comment you link is lamenting the questioner's attitude, not the answerer's. (The questioner was expressing intent to engage in the same bounty-sniping misbehavior if it wasn't being punished) – Ben Voigt Nov 29 '15 at 21:38
  • 2
    Also, there is a difference between summarizing and copy-pasting. As well, the information was referenced in the question itself, so the answer did not add any useful information. Which, as I said before, is not enough in itself to warrant deletion. However, the fact that the bad answer was awarded a bounty despite being completely useless does warrant deletion as that is the only way for the community to remove the unfairly obtained bounty. Otherwise, there would have been no reason to delete the answer. – user4639281 Nov 29 '15 at 21:45
  • @BenVoigt Deletion makes sense then. I missed the context. – approxiblue Nov 29 '15 at 22:08
  • 1
    @Magisch My point is that the actions were justified even before we knew that the voting was fraudulent. That the voting was fraudulent is icing on the cake. – user4639281 Nov 30 '15 at 16:38

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .