7

So often, when I do triage from review, then I have some test posts, and as generally I think, that idea is quite good, but from time to time I feel unfair:

Usually Those test posts are good quality and I have no problem with accepting, them, but today I got post like this: https://stackoverflow.com/review/triage/10360894

Which in my opinion:

  1. Does not show ANY reasearch effort
  2. Some questions may be opinion-based
  3. There are many questions in one "question"

I simply checked this as unsalvageable and ticked it as primarily-opinion based. Since Post had 8 votes, it was a failure to do so, but I really feel this is unfair.

Shouldn't then test questions be chosen by moderators themselves to make test questions be not tricky then?

  • The audit process is fairly arbitrary. – wogsland Jan 2 '16 at 17:39
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Audits are picked by the system because anything else would not scale.

Sometimes a "bad" (I use quotation marks because I actuallly believe that this question isn't a good fit for this site) question end up as an audit the system expects you to endorse. This is an unfortunate result of other users upvoting questions that don't fit the format this site is aiming for. This site has a huge community and there's often dissent about what kind of questions are acceptable or not.

Luckily you have to fail multiple audits before it affects your ability to do reviews. I would not worry about failing the odd one as long as you pass most of them.

You can downvote and/or closevote/flag the question to reduce the chance of it appearing in an audit again but apart from that there's not much else to be done about it.

  • 1
    Hmm. Citation needed for the first sentence. ;) – Nathan Tuggy Nov 28 '15 at 1:28
  • 1
    @NathanTuggy e.g. meta.stackoverflow.com/a/275272/957731 though I honestly thought this was fairly common knowledge by now considering how many times this gets brought up on meta. – ivarni Nov 28 '15 at 6:43
  • A repetition of an unsourced assertion by an authority figure does not a citation make. All I've seen is what appears to be assumptions that it doesn't scale, without actually revealing any reasoning why that's the case. – Nathan Tuggy Nov 28 '15 at 6:56
  • @pnuts: If you succeed an audit you get fewer audits. Skipping doesn't have that effect, as far as I know... – Deduplicator Jan 27 '16 at 9:22
  • @NathanTuggy citation here: "While Kate's suggestion for hand-picked audits would be nice, that really can't scale; we need a lot of these generated on a regular basis..." – gnat Mar 27 '16 at 19:46
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    @gnat: Again, that's not a citation, that's just an assertion without anything remotely resembling an actual quantitative analysis. Since I went to considerable trouble in the past to do a quantitative analysis of my own showing how it could scale, without any kind of rebuttal of any of my points or challenges to any of my assumptions, I consider the burden of proof rather on the side of those assuming a problem of scale. – Nathan Tuggy Mar 27 '16 at 20:17

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