51

Recently, I've been noticing a certain trend here on meta:

People seem to become increasingly scared of possibly offending someone.

Some examples:


One of the suggested questions for the 2016 survey asked what, and how much alcohol the user consumes, if any.
In response, someone that chose not to consume any alcohol said:

I don't drink by choice, not as a result of religion or whatever the other usual reasons, and I'm sick of being bombarded with it everywhere I go.

To which a ♦ mod replied:

This doesn't seem like it should offend anyone, but the comments here & votes suggest it might. It's not up to me to decide what's offensive; we can only acknowledge that and try to address it, in this case by finding language for this survey question & answers that plays nice.


One of the candidates for moderator made a "My eyes are up here" joke on chat. In his moderator questionnaire answer, that was brought up like this:

How will you handle sexist remarks as a moderator, while making derogatory comments like "can you make a women's version that says, "My eyes are up here"?" in chat?


(There's been a few more cases like this, but I think you get the point.)

In these examples, comments or suggestions are criticized just because they might offend someone.

So what?

SO can't possibly strive to please everyone.
Besides, the more we try not to offend anyone, the more reasons users will find to feel offended.

What happened? Since when are we on a path to abandon common sense and a sense of humor for the fear of possibly hurting someone's feelings?

This is just my observation, but if we are going out of our way not to offend someone, are we really doing the site a favor, or is it a lost battle?

  • 16
    I realize this may come across as a bit of a rant. I'm sorry if that offends anyone ;-) – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:12
  • 10
    I am very interested in this as well. I notice the trend on the internet alone, especially amongst teens, and not at all in real life - while having a quite diverse and broad group of peers. The being offended by "nothing" and the "fear" of offending others, I mean. I also wonder if it's constrained to the US. And yes, I've removed my comment that triggered the ♦ mod reply in that topic (almost immediately after posting), as I did not want to hold this discussion there. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '15 at 14:17
  • 14
    The most interesting part of the drinking question would be to see whether peoples' answers change before and after being elected SO mod. – Bill the Lizard Nov 18 '15 at 14:20
  • 11
    Also, off-topic, but I very much like your title. :) – Kendra Nov 18 '15 at 14:26
  • 12
    "the more we try not to offend anyone, the more reasons users will find to feel offended" - I'm not convinced by that. "Since when are we on a path to abandon common sense and a sense of humor for the fear of possibly hurting someone's feelings?" - since the growing realisation that the culture around activities can exclude people from them, whether or not that's the intention? "going out of our way not to offend someone" sounds like an odd way to write "empathise". – jonrsharpe Nov 18 '15 at 14:28
  • 4
    So, not considering something "Offensive" is a lack of empathy? I disagree. Sorry, but imo, exactly that attitude is the problem. Sure, empathy is crucial as a human being, but that doesn't mean anything that could possibly offend someone should be removed. – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:31
  • 12
    @Cerbrus "not considering something "Offensive" is a lack of empathy?" - no, but not understanding when and why someone else might consider it offensive certainly is. If people are telling you they're offended by something, your first response probably shouldn't be, effectively, "you're wrong to be offended". "that doesn't mean anything that could possibly offend someone should be removed" - I'm not saying that it should. – jonrsharpe Nov 18 '15 at 14:36
  • 3
    It should be "Why are you offended?", sure. But the examples I've shown are about actively avoiding offending that person. They're talking about actually changing the message, instead of figuring out why it's considered offensive. – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:38
  • 5
    @CodeCaster Well, there was a long (and fought against) discussion where I work about not having a prize raffle at the Christmas party anymore because one of the prizes was a "gag gift" that was a barbie one year, and the employee who got it not only got offended that he won it (on a raffle as in anyone in the room could've won it) but I believe he also threatened a harassment charge over it. All that over a gag gift won out of sheer (un)luck. That's just an example. (I think the only reason the change didn't actually occur is that the charge wasn't actually made.) – Kendra Nov 18 '15 at 14:54
  • 21
    I think people need to watch more South Park. Especially the "insecurity" and "safe space" episodes. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '15 at 16:12
  • 13
    People seem to become increasingly scared of possibly offending someone. That's why I'm here--to bring balance to the universe of Meta. – user1228 Nov 18 '15 at 18:27
  • 5
    @TimPost no need to fund the eyeball dremel. That's a real, in use today, medical device. It's used to abrade the surface of the eye so foreign bodies can be removed. And if your eyes aren't watering right now, you are a robot. – user1228 Nov 18 '15 at 18:39
  • 4
    It's a matter of perspective - if a comment is made that will knowingly offend someone then that is absolutely wrong. If a comment is made with no intention to cause offence, and someone does in fact become offended - then that's not being derogatory or offensive in my eyes. – Sam Nov 19 '15 at 9:19
  • 2
    @MacroMan: True, but just saying "I didn't mean to offend anyone" doesn't suddenly make a comment harmless. – Cerbrus Nov 19 '15 at 9:22
  • 4
    @cerbus absolutely - but we all learn from trial and error. If the person says "I didn't mean to offend anyone" and genuinely means it - then they won't do it again, I don't think it's fair to chastise someone for something they were genuinely unaware of. – Sam Nov 19 '15 at 9:26
48

Eggshells are not a suitable foundation on which to build. If everyone is uncomfortable, nothing is pleasant. I agree with that premise, but I think you might be unwittingly making a very wide assumption here:

People seem to become increasingly scared of possibly offending someone.

I'm not certain that scared is the best description; I have also seen people being more careful, which is a pleasant reminder that most people would opt not to make someone uncomfortable if given the choice. Could it be that what you're seeing is simply an artifact of people being aware of choices that might have eluded them previously?

The unfortunate path of learning what isn't 'trivially' objectionable to someone is realizing the extent that you made them feel belittled, unwelcome or uncomfortable through something that you said. You often learn this in retrospect, as an epiphany that hits you while you witness something else. You then actively avoid that which you may have once dismissed by suggesting that someone might benefit from a thicker skin.

In short, you don't know what hurts until you realize how much it hurt someone. Compounding this is the fact that many people that are made to feel marginalized in some manner don't speak up about it, because why would they if common wisdom involves thicker skins and stronger spines? Thus, it perpetuates.

This doesn't mean that we have to be on eggshells, or at odds at all. But we do need to consider that giving people a safe space to say 'that really made me feel bad and I wish you wouldn't say that' is part of what we mean by being here to learn from one another. If people feel safe enough to speak up, and that they won't be immediately invalidated if they do, then we're one step closer to a place where everyone feels welcome.

Be nice when you tell someone that they crossed a line. Be nice, and be open, if someone suggests that you have. Learn from each other. That's all we ask.

  • 36
    "Eggshells are not a suitable foundation on which to build." I'm glad we don't have any egg-laying animals around that could take offense to this statement. Otherwise we'd have to go out of our way to avoid using this metaphor in the future. – BoltClock Nov 18 '15 at 15:58
  • 9
    @BoltClock what about bluefeet and matt? – ryanyuyu Nov 18 '15 at 16:02
  • 4
    @ryanyuyu: Shhh, they haven't seen this question yet. – BoltClock Nov 18 '15 at 16:03
  • 28
    I've seen it @BoltClock and you are walking the line... – Taryn Nov 18 '15 at 16:03
  • 10
    I wholeheartedly agree with this answer. We need to be aware though for people who proactively feel offended for others (i.e. making a problem where there isn't, because they think someone might be offended by something, I'm not talking about people who are genuinely coming out on behalf of others), and for the increasing number of trolls on the web (*kin) who engage in the "social justice warrior" scheme. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '15 at 16:18
  • 7
    @CodeCaster I try to remain receptive to people that just want to share something that they know, like "You might really make someone feel bad that way, and here's why" to the point that I don't always immediately identify people that are so lost in the reason that they're picking a fight that they don't even remember why they're doing it. I suggest erring on assuming most people are just trying to help, even if they need some good feedback on how they're going about it, as this makes the truly lost-and-combative folks easier to spot. – Tim Post Nov 18 '15 at 16:30
  • 1
    You can generally spot such trolls by their blatantly unconstructive tone, @CodeCaster. As with most low-effort trolls. – BoltClock Nov 18 '15 at 16:32
  • 2
    @BoltClock It IS good we don't have any egg-laying animals around. I'll note though that if you'd kept a certain other CM-crusader for an icon, we'd be having an entirely different discussion right now.... – SeldomNeedy Nov 21 '15 at 1:40
21

Since when are we on a path to abandon common sense and a sense of humor for the fear of possibly hurting someone's feelings?

Actually you are absolutely correct that users don't need to go out of their way to avoid stepping on toes. The current Be Nice policy, if anything, endorses your view:

Be welcoming and patient, especially with those who may not know everything you do. Oh, and bring your sense of humor.... In summary, have fun, and be good to each other.

The rest of the policy outlines guidelines for being polite and respecting other users, but it does not claim you have to be a saint. Just that you should have some minimum level of respect for your fellow users, which most people in the SO community have. Wrongly branding someone as "intolerant/racist/sexist/etc" is, well, offensive and even actively harmful to their (actual) web reputation. So users also need to be careful in accusing other users of malicious intent, and that includes not trolling other users with frivolous and premature "this might offend someone" ivory tower standards.

Clearly rude material has no place on SO, but maybe, possibly off-color content doesn't need to be overmoderated. IMO, as long as users make an honest attempt to be polite and professional, any lingering "offensive" content can just be edited or removed as necessary. Edits, comments, and comment flags are usually sufficient in this regard.

  • 3
    Well said! Couldn't have analyzed it better myself. :) – Kendra Nov 18 '15 at 15:07
  • 3
    Why humor? I thought we hated fun! (jk jk) – Patrice Nov 18 '15 at 15:08
  • 4
    Except then you end up being the one accused of violating this policy when someone takes offense to something that is otherwise generally not a big deal. Edit rereading the third paragraph it specifically accounts for that sort of thing. – BoltClock Nov 18 '15 at 15:11
  • 1
    @BoltClock in those situations, my opinion is that polite comments notifying the user once the actual offense has occurred is the way to go. Then the content can be removed as necessary. Or even just a simple edit or "Not constructive" comment flag. No harm no foul. And of course, if the situation escalates, then it's time for a moderator flag. – ryanyuyu Nov 18 '15 at 15:16
3

Unfortunately there are, and always will be, people who go through life trying to find fault with others. These are the people for whom the phrase "offence is taken, not given" was coined. They're not trolls because their offence is not false; they really believe that the world is out to get them. In this respect they're worse than trolls, because a troll generally stops at some stage once s/he has got enough of a rise out of his/her audience.

There's nothing you can do about these kinds of people, except ignore them. Engaging with them is a waste of time because they're not willing to be reasoned with. (In this they're rather like the religious fundamentalists they so often claim to be the polar opposite of.)

Ultimately it's about the difference about being constantly offensive versus a few off-the-cuff comments. The former are not and should not be welcome on Stack Overflow, the latter are only human. Everyone says something insensitive every now and again, but that doesn't mean we should be pre-emptively censoring in case that one person is "triggered".

  • 2
    "Everyone says something insensitive every now and again, but that doesn't mean we should be pre-emptively censoring in case that one person is "triggered"." This sums up my point of view pretty well. – Cerbrus Nov 19 '15 at 9:11
  • 2
    Being brush and abrasive is one thing - everyone has bad days. Using what someone is, or something about them in a manner that demeans, marginalizes or ridicules them is something that polite people should endeavor to avoid, and appreciate being called out on if they inadvertently do it. – Tim Post Nov 19 '15 at 12:04
3

In my opinion it's a disturbing trend on the internet as a whole, striving to and going to great lengths as to not offend anyone. I'm fine with taking extra measure not to wherever it is admissible and does not remove valuable content, but the amount to which it happens is becoming increasingly concerning, for me at least.

Now on SO, I feel like it's not a big issue at the moment. We certainly have people who get offended at everything, but the silent consensus still seems to be "nobody cares" in general.

  • 6
    Not just the internet. – user400654 Nov 18 '15 at 15:49
  • 12
    This post requires a TRIGGER WARNING for those offended by the incorrect use of "its". – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 18 '15 at 17:38
  • 3
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit I'm slightly offended by caps + italics at once... – Patrice Nov 18 '15 at 18:16
  • 5
    @Patrice sOrRy – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 18 '15 at 23:06
  • Error A0A "Apostrophe Not Found" – Ian Kemp Nov 19 '15 at 9:02
-5

I would say that part of the problem with your question is that (at least in America) the drinking is seen as a requirement especially in advertising. This over pushing of the products causes people to get fed up with the push of it in general don't wan't to have to deal with it in places where it doesn't need to be. When talking about a developer survey the use of alcohol doesn't play into that in some people's opinion.

  • 3
    The drinking example was just an example... This doesn't really answer this question. Sure, I can understand why alcohol consumption might be considered irrelevant in the survey, but offensive? My first reaction would be: "Come on! Get over it!" – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:27
  • 1
    If "You won't have fun unless you drink! " is seen as offensive, maybe we need to redefine that word. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '15 at 14:33
  • 5
    @CodeCaster: Maybe the definition of "Offensive" got twisted over the last few years to include even the slightest "bump"... – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:34
  • 3
    "One of the big problems in the software industry in general is diversity and that can be linked directly to behavior that is offensive to others" - wow. [citation needed], for both claims. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '15 at 14:38
  • 14
    @Cerbrus The problem is that people now seem to think that they have a RIGHT to NEVER be offended. I see it as highly immature. Life is offensive and hard, we have to live with that. Maybe because I have a very very very dark sense of humor it doesn't impact me, but I do see that trend in general as well where people are extremely careful of ANYTHING because it may offend one person. I understand that people have different threshold to offense.... but some people seem to be pushing it (like in your example) – Patrice Nov 18 '15 at 14:39
  • 2
    @Patrice: 100% that. – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:40
  • 10
    @JoeW to me, the problem isn't that people realize (or don't) that we have different thresholds. My problem with this is that the human experience can be so vast people can find offense in ANYTHING (I lost my father to sickness 5 years ago and I had a super hard time getting over it... am I allowed to stop anyone mentioning the word "dad" because of this? NO. Should I? GOD NO. Is it normal I feel sad every time I see/read/hear dad or father? Yes. Should I make it a big deal? OF COURSE NOT). If my experience can make "dad" offensive (or hurtful), where do we stop? THAT'S the issue I think. – Patrice Nov 18 '15 at 14:54
  • 5
    @JoeW: Can we please not bring the "women in tech" debate into this? Thanks. – Cerbrus Nov 18 '15 at 14:55
  • 2
    Personally, I don't get offended by anything on the internet to enough of an extent to care. I care about the Site quality of the community im in, and recognize wildly offensive stuff (to most) is inappropiate and harmful to it, but beyond that, I honestly could not possibly care less if people badmouth, insult, or otherwise rude talk me on the internet. – Magisch Nov 18 '15 at 14:56
  • 2
    @Magisch "I don't get offended so nobody else should either"? – jonrsharpe Nov 18 '15 at 15:30
  • 2
    more like @jonrsharpe "people who waste their precious time of day getting angry at people on the internet are not very smart" – Magisch Nov 18 '15 at 15:31
  • 1
    @Magisch I agree it is good if you can ignore things that you find offensive but that is not something that everyone is willing to do. Personally the issue about alcohol doesn't bother me but I posted it as an example. – Joe W Nov 18 '15 at 16:10
  • 2
    @Magisch you understand that the outcome you're describing is a lack of empathy on the part of others, rather than some failing of the person raising their head above the parapet to say "that offends me", right? "incessant complaining" isn't what we're talking about. – jonrsharpe Nov 18 '15 at 23:58
  • 4
    Empathy, or the lack thereof, is a slippery slope. Soon we'll reach the point where the best way to demonstrate empathy with everyone ever is to stay completely silent. Good luck getting anything done with silence. (I regret any offence caused as a result of this comment.) – BoltClock Nov 19 '15 at 9:09
  • 5
    To make matters more complicated: Saying someone lacks the ability to empathize with someone that's offended for some reason, illustrates a certain lack of empathy with the person that thinks it's silly to be offended by that... Which could be considered offensive. – Cerbrus Nov 19 '15 at 9:14

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .