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I was recently looking for an old deleted question of mine, found here, for the purpose of a chatroom discussion. When I was looking at the revision history, I saw that the post was closed (initiated by me as a duplicate), and then was deleted by three users.

The weird part is, the question was reopened by a gold badge user after deletion. I didn't even know this was possible, since it doesn't follow the normal workflow for questions. Is this a bug? If not, is there a purpose for this feature? It doesn't make sense to me that questions can be re-opened while they are deleted.

(For the record, the question is already answered elsewhere and therefore should be/remain closed, regardless of whether it remains deleted or not)

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    Cross-site duplicate: Why can I vote to reopen a deleted question? – user3717023 Nov 4 '15 at 19:23
  • So ninja closing/reopening is a thing? that's weird – ryanyuyu Nov 4 '15 at 19:23
  • @NormalHuman So it seems it is a bug (or at least, a feature that needs changing, according to Shog's post), but nothing was done because it's such an edge case. – TylerH Nov 4 '15 at 19:25
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The "deleted" and "close" status of a question are independent.

The normal workflow of things is a question that's closed is possibly eligible for deletion by at least three (or more depending on the total scores of the Q&A's) but no more than ten 10k+ users.

However, there's two main exceptions to this:

  • The roomba (aka. Community bot)
  • Moderators

In the case of the bot, it's acting on certain "clean-up" rules, hence roomba'ing - it couldn't possibly know what reason to close it for in the first place - hence it just deletes on criteria which is documented elsewhere.

As for moderators - sometimes it's, for complete junk, much faster to not have to close a question, but skip straight to a delete (so it kind of "breaks" the "normal" workflow) - although, if there is a good closure reason, we'll do that first before deleting.

So, if we ignore "locking", we end up with posts that are:

  • Open
  • Closed
  • Closed and deleted
  • (Optionally closed) and deleted by a mod

Therefore, it's completely possible a deleted post is open and just needs undelete votes. Or, a deleted post is available for re-open votes.

If re-opened, the post remains in its "deleted" state, and if undeleted remains in its "closed" state.

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    I'm not sure this answers my question. I'm asking specifically why it's even possible for a post that is deleted and closed to be re-opened without first being undeleted, or at least undeleted in concert with re-opening. It doesn't make sense to re-open a deleted question and leave it deleted. – TylerH Nov 4 '15 at 20:05
  • @TylerH because a question is allowed to be opened/closed and remain deleted. – Jon Clements Nov 4 '15 at 20:07
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    Yes, clearly. Why – TylerH Nov 4 '15 at 20:08
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    They're independent states - why not? – Jon Clements Nov 4 '15 at 20:09
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    What's the usefulness or purpose of opening a closed question (or closing an open question) in the "deleted" state, if it is just going to remain deleted and therefore invisible to the site? – TylerH Nov 4 '15 at 20:10
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    @TylerH I can't think of a practical use admittedly... but if one is opening a question, then presumably you've got access to it, so will be undeleting it as well... if you really want it back on the site, it'd be a bit annoying to have to wait for undeletion to cast a reopen vote - why not allow both at the same time? – Jon Clements Nov 4 '15 at 20:14
  • I'd agree with and support that notion, if the casting of a re-open vote on a closed, deleted question were tied to an undelete vote, and vice versa, but you've just said they're two independent states/actions. So is it coincidence that the user Mjolnir-reopened the question and voted to undelete it, or are the two actions in fact not independent of one another? – TylerH Nov 4 '15 at 20:18
  • @TylerH voting to re-open doesn't automatically cast an undelete vote – Jon Clements Nov 4 '15 at 20:26
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    @TylerH What, exactly, is the harm of them being two independent states? Other than confusing you. Before additional rules (which increase complexity, and will lead to bugs) are added, those rules should have reason to exist. What practical problem results? Now, the system could have made deleted and closed part of a continuum, but once it did not adding rules to make it so is added complexity. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Nov 5 '15 at 14:44
  • @Yakk I haven't said there's harm in them being independent states, nor is my question about them being independent. I'm asking why one state change is possible while a second, trumping state can still be active/true. Did you read my question? – TylerH Nov 5 '15 at 14:49
  • @TylerH If they are actually independent states, then that state change is possible. That is what "independent" means. If one state caused restrictions on the other, they aren't independent. Making them dependent on each other (in any, and in each way) adds complexity. One should justify additional complexity. Do you have any justification? If not, then why shouldn't "they are independent states" sufficiently answer your question? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Nov 5 '15 at 15:00
  • @Yakk My justification is that it makes no sense to be able to do this. It is a pointless and fruitless and confusing and potentially workflow-breaking action. "They are independent states" doesn't answer my question because my question is asking for the reasoning behind the mechanical ability; it's not like wanting to know why we don't float away from the Earth and someone answering "gravity". It doesn't tell me anything except a word, likewise "they're independent" doesn't tell me anything except what I already know. Clearly they're independent or the scenario wouldn't have arisen. – TylerH Nov 5 '15 at 15:26
  • @Yakk My further comments on Jon's answer here seek to find the justification of why they're independent in this case. As Shog pointed out in his answer to the cross-site dupe, there is no such justification, and the behavior should be different. – TylerH Nov 5 '15 at 15:30

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