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We all remember this wonderful April Fools' question. My query is regarding the fact that it is locked. I am curious as to… why? Or, more precisely, why does the lock banner say:

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site

I think this sends the wrong message. The question is very clear, contains a MCVE, lists the compilers the code's been attempted on… what exactly is off-topic about it? It's basically the perfect question. Don't we want people to learn from clear, well-researched questions with good answers?

Especially given the high number of views the question attracts, I suggest altering the lock banner so as not to mislead people about what is and is not a good "why won't my code work" question.

  • I think that joke questions are not really that great or on-topic either. Yes, they can be funny (and this one certainly is), but that still does not make them real, seriously answerable questions. Just my humble opinion. – JonasCz - Reinstate Monica Nov 1 '15 at 18:50
  • @JonasCz: Determining whether a post is a "joke" question or not, in general, requires judging the intentions of the author. I do not think we should be doing that, nor that we can do that, nor that we are generally encouraged to. We are supposed to vote/flag based on the content, not the person. – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 1 '15 at 18:51
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    You are following the letter of the law not its spirit. But if you want a valid close reason, it's "not reproducible." – approxiblue Nov 1 '15 at 19:03
  • @approxiblue: Isn't it? I get exactly the same results when I follow the OP's report. – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 1 '15 at 19:04
  • There's a principle here. The spirit of the law is precisely what I am questioning. If I were following only the letter of the law then there would be no option at all: the question is on-topic per that. – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 1 '15 at 19:06
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    Considering that we use the term "off-topic" to mean "on-topic, except that you're missing a piece of information", I don't think you're going to get very far with this one. Also, the banner is not per-question configurable so far as I know. Other than that, I'm inclined to agree. – Josh Caswell Nov 1 '15 at 19:15
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    Anyone downvoting this needs to seriously reconsider what brought them to this point in their lives. – hobbs Nov 1 '15 at 19:38
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    @hobbs I'd upvote that, but I reached my daily vote limit. That question is so obviously on-topic that it is saddening to see it locked. What if I actually tried to compile a program that I actually wrote on a napkin? Where would I find out what the errors meant? – user4639281 Nov 1 '15 at 21:53
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    If anyone seriously wants this question unlocked, you'd also be asking for us to delete almost all of the total crap answers that are clearly April Fools' jokes because they definitely do not belong here. Only two or three of those answers even attempt to answer the question in a meaningful sense that is allowed. – animuson Nov 1 '15 at 22:48
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    @animuson the problem not necessarily that it's locked, but that the stated reason is obviously a lie. – hobbs Nov 2 '15 at 3:32
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    @hobbs It's not at all a lie. People used it as a joke question. While it was popular, that's not allowed here. If people would like to revisit it and make it a suitable question by deleting all the junk off of it and making it look legitimate, then by all means let's discuss that. But I don't believe at the time anyone was interested in doing that. – animuson Nov 2 '15 at 3:35
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    @animuson that's perfectly valid — and not the reason given. – hobbs Nov 2 '15 at 3:37
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    @animuson you can pretend that "off-topic" means any question which can be closed — but you can't simultaneously pretend that the site is designed for use by people who speak the English language. How about advertising the official language as Stackoverflonese? – hobbs Nov 2 '15 at 3:50
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    @Normal: [Why did you delete your answer?!] Besides, what does being "chatty and open-ended" have to do with being rhetorical? The more I engage on this thread, the more I think the notion of "on-topic" on SO is very poorly defined! (N.B. poorly, not weakly) – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 2 '15 at 15:18
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    If we delete the question, can I repost its content in an attempt to genuinely learn something and see what the answers say, in particular not on April 1st? SMFH. – djechlin Jun 26 '16 at 6:50
3

You make a good point about how well written the question is. It has all the things we would want in a great question. Those are all also all the subtle things someone who is active on meta would notice. The very first thing I noticed (and what I suspect most other people would notice as well) is that it is a silly question. And I can easily see many new users or the users that just spew crap at the site taking that as evidence that they can ask anything they want. "I wrote a hello world program in bread dough. Why won't gcc compile my bread? I want to eat it!!11!!1" Or "How can I set my programmable thermostat? I tried gcc." Everything is on topic as long as you tried gcc!

Also, and more important than anything else, we hate fun, especially on April Fools.


To preserve some of the rationale from the comments (which is better than what I originally had anyway):

From the help center on what not to ask under subjective questions it states that if a question is just "mindless social fun" then it is off topic.

You can play devil's advocate all you like and claim that a duck robot walks like a duck and quacks like a duck and is therefore a duck. But waddling and quacking are only two facets of what makes a duck a duck. We could get hyper-specific about what determines "duckness" or "on-topic". But then we either end up with a definition that is too broad and allows things we don't want for the sake of a few edge cases that we do want. Or we define things too narrowly and miss out on lots of things we really do want here. And that's why we have humans moderating the site, not machines. It's a judgement call.

And as we go along we change what we call "on topic" as we try to define that better. We used to have the RTFM close reason. Now we don't. We used to have the "too localized" reason. We didn't used to have the "debugging requires an MCVE" reason.

I may not be able to formally define what every off-topic question looks like, that doesn't mean I can't recognize that something is off-topic. And even if I believe something is off-topic, I need at least 4 other people to agree with me before something gets closed. StackOverflow's moderation strategy is built on the idea that judgement calls have to be made and that (most of the time) it isn't a unilateral decision. If five people say it's off-topic, it's off-topic. If five more people disagree, we reopen. If it gets too hotly contested, either one of the Powers That Be steps in or we bring it to meta.

  • Neither of those examples satisfy quality criteria. As long as a post does, who are we to judge the OP's problem? If you're programming a thermostat with C++ then fair enough! I would have thought that you make for an interesting question, not something for the moderators to lock, close and delete because they think the OP is "silly". – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 2 '15 at 15:23
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit From the help center on what not to ask under subjective questions it states that if a question is just "mindless social fun" then it is off topic. You can play devil's advocate all you like and claim that a duck robot walks like a duck and quacks like a duck and is therefore a duck. But waddling and quacking are only two facets of what makes a duck a duck. We could get hyper-specific about what determines "duckness" or "on-topic". (cont.) – Becuzz Nov 2 '15 at 15:51
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit (cont..) But then we either end up with a definition that is too broad and allows things we don't want for the sake of a few edge cases that we do want. Or we define things too narrowly and miss out on lots of things we really do want here. And that's why we have humans moderating the site, not machines. It's a judgement call. And as we go along we change what we call "on topic" as we try to define that better. We used to have the RTFM close reason. Now we don't. We used to have the "too localized" reason. (cont..) – Becuzz Nov 2 '15 at 15:51
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit (cont) We didn't used to have the "debugging requires an MCVE" reason. I may not be able to formally define what every piece of garbage looks like, that doesn't mean I can't recognize garbage. And even if I believe something is garbage, I need at least 4 other people to agree with me before something gets closed. StackOverflow's moderation strategy is built on the idea that judgement calls have to be made and that (most of the time) it isn't a unilateral decision. (cont) – Becuzz Nov 2 '15 at 15:52
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit (cont) If five people say it's crap, it's crap. If five more people disagree, we reopen. If it gets too hotly contested, either one of the Powers That Be steps in or we bring it to meta. – Becuzz Nov 2 '15 at 15:52
  • You almost had me, until you started confusing "off-topic posts" for "crap posts" (these are orthogonal) and suggesting that the excellent question in question is "garbage"! – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 2 '15 at 16:31
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Same idea, just replace "crap" with "off-topic". I know they aren't one and the same, but many times they overlap a bit. (Also, getting distracted in the middle of writing that didn't help with consistancy.) – Becuzz Nov 2 '15 at 16:33
  • Meh, fine, you got it. I think you should add that rationale to the answer, though; it's better than what's already there! – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 2 '15 at 16:59
  • I thought we didn't use machines to moderate the site because human speech is inherently difficult to parse using RegEx. – user4639281 Nov 2 '15 at 21:54
  • But it's not mindless social fun, I learned a crap ton from this answer >_____< there's nothing wrong with a quality question being enjoyable, where do we get this idea – djechlin Jun 26 '16 at 7:03
  • and if the answers are fabricating quotes from the spec the question is sorely a troll (if not in original intent, then in practice long after original April Fools day) which needs to be better marked or deleted. – djechlin Jun 26 '16 at 7:04
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I appreciate the duck-typing argument - it looks off-topic so call it that past a certain point - but there are tremendous reasons to regard this question as on topic.

  • At the core of it all this question is simultaneously humorous in origin and intent and a valid, serious question. It's multiple inheritance in that sense, which is honestly befitting a C++ question c.f. say Java, but I really expect programmers to be able to follow that.
  • And I really mean the question contains serious content. It is not just mimicking serious content. You may read this question and say, "I realize this is a joke, but the OP makes a good point! I obviously don't expect a compiler to perform OCR but does the spec actually talk about why it's not supposed to? I thought the specs are complete, are they?"
  • As a result I learn a tremendous amount from these answers! I reinforce my belief that the specs are lawyer-level thorough - or, wait, did I learn exactly that from this answer some years ago? - and learn a thing about the relationship between the language and compilers. Even if the question were only a joke, which it emphatically is not, this is still exactly how SO is supposed to work because we optimize for pearls, not sand.
  • Enjoyment by itself is not a close reason. I am of the opinion that an average reader can be expected to follow the humorous or sarcastic nature of the post, which has the underlying tone of "I don't really expect it to work, but why not, isn't that a good question when you think about it?"
  • And most importantly, this question is a beautifully written perfect example of how to ask a good question on SO! It is perfectly "researched" and incredibly thorough. That's what makes it a compelling April Fools joke - that it snaps into SO standards to a tee. This is a perfect education opportunity or teachable moment - why would we waste it with a big, fat "Just kidding, this isn't what an on topic question looks like" at the end?
  • I also think this embodies wonderful qualities to have in an engineer. Engineers playfully try to break things. They want to understand why the obvious is true, and sometimes it isn't so true after all. Maybe the OP would have been surprised by an obscure compiler project that attempts to OCR hand-written code first and is completely compliant and has educational uses. I encourage this quality in any engineer I work with, and they are all the better to work with if they can bring humor to my day as well.
  • I believe evaluating author intent is thoroughly out of scope when evaluating a question - yes, even when the intent is obvious.

It's just frustrating to me that we can't identify a good question if it happens to be humorous or enjoyable. That really shouldn't be too abstract for us to handle. And I want to reopen this debate - and question - because I believe there is didactic value and it sends the wrong message to say "you can't play dumb to learn something even if you write a perfect question." This is a highly valuable question to us as an an open one.

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