11

On this question, the original was one long run on without sentence punctuation.

It's not the best question to begin with because it's so vague, but I figured adding periods and sentence caps and making it possible to read what's intended would be helpful to the question.

Is that not enough to make it useful?

I'm trying hard not to assume anything about the user's intent so I don't want to make major changes or any changes that aren't obviously supported by their words. I can't comment yet to let the asker know to add more details, and I don't have an answer for it, so the edit was what I could contribute.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/9891130

This question was also rejected but by community by contradicting a later edit. Is there a way to see what the contradiction was? And to have access to the edits to resubmit with a change to correct for the contradiction? It took a while to add these edits and they seem like they'd make it easier to read IHMO, so I'd like to re-submit without the contradiction.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/9883712

  • Bonus Reading Material: Polishing Turds, a reviewer's guide Pedantic (sorry) side note: one long run-on sentence. – theB Oct 19 '15 at 14:16
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    It was wrong of the user to reject and edit, leaving things like "u" instead of "you". The correct behavior would have been to accept and edit. – Brian Oct 19 '15 at 15:43
  • @Brian - now that makes sense to me. I added some useful edits. In my hesitation to override the OP, I may not have edited enough... but adding more to my edits by accepting them... would have created an even better end result IMHO. – HowTo Oct 20 '15 at 4:21
  • @theB yes, it's run-on. I felt stupid editing my question about editing so I left it... but I've corrected it now. – HowTo Oct 20 '15 at 4:22
16

Even though there were a few tweaks left to make (remove "Goodnight", remove "thank you", clean up some of the sentence structure), this question should be is now closed for being too broad. Here's the warning statement that should've set some alarms off:

I'm not getting how to make the solution for this. I already searched a lot and found nothing to help me. Who can help me?

No amount of editing is going to redeem that sort of question. Perhaps if the OP came back, added what work they had done, and then clarified where they were struggling, then it'd be worth editing into shape...but it's really not worth the time.

  • I left the good night and thank you because it's the person's own way of expressing themselves and I didn't want to change that. Thank you in particular seems nice to say? – HowTo Oct 18 '15 at 6:02
  • Even if the question would be closed, I would think it better to approve an edit in case it's later not closed (such as the OP does come back and add a lot). I don't want to be judging questions inadequate unless I'm also going to vote on them that way. So this puzzles me. – HowTo Oct 18 '15 at 6:04
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    @HowTo: It's not that it's impolite or a form of expression, per se - it's just noise. The question is what counts here, and so long as that's clearly expressed, then the rest isn't entirely relevant. Since this isn't a forum, saying "thanks" is better expressed either through upvotes or an accepted answer as opposed to anything in the question. – Makoto Oct 18 '15 at 6:04
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    @HowTo: My personal preference would be to only edit a question that either desperately needs an edit lest it be cast into the wolves (but is otherwise a good question), or just needs that extra bit of polish. Personally I wouldn't want to edit a question just to have it closed/deleted a few days later. There are more valuable things to do with your time in that regard. – Makoto Oct 18 '15 at 6:05
  • thanks for the ideas. They make sense. While it may be more valuable and something for me to consider --- I dont' understand the standard of rejecting the edit because it's not a good question to begin with. If the editor loses the points again after it's closed, that's the editor's worry not the reviewer's, it would seem to me. – HowTo Oct 18 '15 at 6:16
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    @Howto: that reviewer may have decided to send a message to the editor that it was a futile exercise, and you would have been better spend your time on posts worth the effort. – usr2564301 Oct 18 '15 at 10:28
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    @HowTo: I think there is value in editing posts that are going to be closed anyway, or that are already closed, since it sends an alert to the OP that questions should be written carefully. However you may wish to save these kinds of edits until you are a trusted editor and do not need to go through the review queue (I think it's 2K rep). – halfer Oct 18 '15 at 11:55
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    @jong - a better way to send that message is if there was a rejection reason selectable that says "too poor a question, likely to be closed, so don't waste our time on these." Then I would have known with the first edit and not come here or wasted my time on others. Halfer - thanks. – HowTo Oct 18 '15 at 14:12
7

I think you have two distinct issues. For the Rubik’s cube you and a reviewer just seem to have disagreed about what most needed changing. You lost out because the reviewer had enough rep to be able to make edits without having them reviewed. As it happens, I think neither what was proposed nor what was implemented was as comprehensive as it should have been (so both less than perfect) but if I had had to choose one version or the other I think I would have preferred yours.

The other issue (PIG) was just a consequence of how the system works in real time. While your suggested edit was in the approvals process someone else happened along and changed what it was you were proposing to edit. Here “Rejection” might be better worded as “Superseded” – the version you were suggesting edits to was no longer the current version. Such edit conflicts do not mean the changes that were incorporated were better than your suggestion, or worse – theoretically they might even have been the same – only that while your suggestion was waiting in the review queue someone else’s fast tracked past it.

In both cases you can see what actually was effected by going to the posts and clicking on the date (maybe “edited yesterday”) above where the last person to edit the post is shown (when that is not the OP).

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    Thanks @pnuts. That helps explain. – HowTo Oct 20 '15 at 4:24

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