-10

I have seen this a few times. Someone edits an answer or question to conform to how they would type something. A recent example:

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/review/suggested-edits/121225

I have seen this a few times most recently. Are these people supposed to be doing this? It seems like an attempt to just gain edits in awkward attempts at gaining badges for edits maybe?

In the example above the person edited several parts of my answer so they could adjust my "your" to a "you're" and meet the minimum edit requirement of 6 characters. This seems completely unnecessary, right?

I would understand if I were posting in the Language stackexchange or similar. I am obviously going to edit it back to what I had it at but, yea.

My concern is, I answered it like I want to answer it, not like a random person days later thinks I should type something. It is still very clear what is being said.

Is there any way to flag this edit and reverse the points they may have earned by submitting what appears to be a fake edit?

12
  • That edit should have been rejected as "no improvement whatsever". Oct 17 '15 at 17:32
  • This person earned their edit gold badge by probably doing things exactly like this. Submitting fake edits. Any way to flag this kind of thing?
    – Jesse
    Oct 17 '15 at 17:33
  • 1
    Not sure I would've rejected it, but what's so bad about an edit that (maybe too trivially) improves the post? And yes, fake edits happen a lot, and blindly approving them happens even more. This was waaay better than approving spam.
    – M.A.R.
    Oct 17 '15 at 17:34
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    That's on prog.se not Stack Overflow. Either you're on the wrong meta, or you chose a bad example; however that example is improving the quality of the post. Usage of correct punctuation is most definitely an improvement.
    – user4639281
    Oct 17 '15 at 17:37
  • I chose a fine example, this is a Stack Exchange wide issue
    – Jesse
    Oct 17 '15 at 17:37
  • 6
    If it is a Stack Exchange wide issue, then you should be asking on meta.stackexchange.com.
    – user4639281
    Oct 17 '15 at 17:38
  • 2
  • @JoshCaswell - In that link the author has a lot of downvotes as well. Too many people around here farming reputation to be useful. At 2 points an edit, that is a sad way to get rep
    – Jesse
    Oct 18 '15 at 0:32
  • Funny how since I posted this I happened to get random downvotes on some of my older questions / answers
    – Jesse
    Oct 18 '15 at 0:33
  • 2
    @Jesse: Don't call well-meaning editors names, even if they should in some specifc instance done it wrong. Also, only those below 2K can possibly get a token amount of rep for an approved suggetion. Oct 18 '15 at 0:58
  • What names are those?
    – Jesse
    Oct 18 '15 at 0:59
  • There's a lifetime maximum of 1000 rep from suggested edits, and you don't get any once you're over 2k.
    – jscs
    Oct 18 '15 at 4:38
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Editors tend not to get hit on in bars. No one wants to see the editor at the head of the conga line. However, they, along with phone sanitizers, play a valuable role in society. Furthermore, sometimes the object is not the "your" -> "you're" but something else, like a change of nextLint -> nextInt but to achieve the necessary six edits to submit the edit, with the first edit being beyond dispute something that improves the quality of the answer for other users.

I have often been caught up in the "too little change" rule, but feel that my motivations were pure and that my edits were improving quality. Now I'm going back to my bath.

2
  • 6
    Are those first two sentences really necessary?
    – CodeCaster
    Oct 17 '15 at 18:36
  • Obviously a lot of grammar nazis here. Weel Shawn, iy thinek yu had a gud ansur, sow iy choose it as akseptd won. Your welcome
    – Jesse
    Oct 18 '15 at 0:27
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First, the example is on Programmers, not on Stack Overflow.
So this is not quite the right site to discuss it, or a bad example.

Anyway:

Substitution of "you're" for "your" there is correcting an obvious error. Still, avoiding the contraction and using "you are" would have been better.

Aside from that, the new punctuation is no worse, and arguably a shade better.
To me, it looks like it was mostly done to get over the "too little change"-rule for the main change.

All in all, I would have rejected and edited just the fix, though without contraction.

5
  • Thanks for the answer. I agree that I personally could have edited the 'your' to 'you are' but that someone else should not need to. Cheers.
    – Jesse
    Oct 17 '15 at 17:46
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    The commas were just as grammatically incorrect as the use of "your"; they were being used to separate two complete sentences, which is a semicolon's job. That part of the edit is not at all superfluous.
    – jscs
    Oct 17 '15 at 19:01
  • @JoshCaswell I added the commas back when I reverted his edits, you are too late to the game
    – Jesse
    Oct 18 '15 at 0:26
  • 1
    Well you did wrong then, @Jesse.
    – jscs
    Oct 18 '15 at 1:14
  • So the downvotes would tell me. Cheers
    – Jesse
    Oct 18 '15 at 1:17

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