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I recently found this bounty question. In this comment, a user basically says that the question isn't worth answering to them without a bounty.

Is this acceptable behavior for StackOverflow? In the spirit of helping people and answering questions, I'd say it is inappropriate to comment that a question isn't worth answering. If it should be closed, flag it. If it's a poor question, downvote it. If it's not worth your time, ignore it.

EDIT: Screenshot for <10k users:

screenshot

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    Leave a bounty and I'll answer this question! – Gaelan Oct 18 '15 at 16:50
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There's nothing constructive about that comment, so flagging it as such would be fine.

So long as the user hasn't been causing a trend of comments like this, then I'd say that this is just a minor annoyance. Flag it and move on.

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    The bounty has been up for a few days now but the guy is nowhere to be seen. So he wasn't even really asking for a bounty to answer the question - he's basically tricked the OP into "donating" their rep back to the community. Not so sure I'd call that a minor annoyance, considering once you put up a bounty you can't get it back under normal circumstances. I could take pity on the OP and reimburse them their rep in this specific situation, but we don't know if the bounty was indeed coerced. Meanwhile, I have something for the other user... – BoltClock Oct 16 '15 at 3:53
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    @BoltClock: At this point it's kind of a double-edged sword, isn't it? Yes, the 50 reputation was lost likely due to someone's flippant remark, but the question is getting attention as a result of it. Is that a bad thing? Also, would a bounty be refundable if it were the case that the user did it but then said that they made a mistake? (There are a lot of warning signs before you agree to offer one...) – Makoto Oct 16 '15 at 3:54
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    IMO there is a difference between making a mistake out of your own carelessness, and doing something out of coercion. But you have a point - the question is getting attention as a result of the bounty. Better than mine which received more views in its first couple of days than its entire 7-day bounty period. – BoltClock Oct 16 '15 at 4:00
  • @BoltClock It is possible that the user used one account to set it up, and another account to answer it and get the points. – Trisped Oct 16 '15 at 20:11
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No.

StackOverflow has always been a site intended to be a collection of knowledge, where people can ask questions that are of use to a wide audience, and others who can help share their knowledge to provide information to others can answer those questions. Asking for payment in any form to provide that information is totally against the intent of SO (and all of the other StackExchange sites), and any comment that asks for payment in any form should be flagged as "not constructive", and any answer that suggests that a bounty would provide a better solution should be downvoted.

If someone wants to participate here, their goal should be to share knowledge they have with others who have a problem you can help them solve. If your goal is simply to increase your own implied sense of worth with meaningless internet points, you're in the wrong place. If you want to charge people for sharing your knowledge, visit a site where people seek consultants or contractors for hire; this is not the site for you.

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    "rep." != "payment". Our "rep." points are not exchangeable for goods or services. At most, they unlock parts of the web site; not much different from similar mechanisms in video games...I don't see anyone confusing those mechanisms with paying the player for playing the game. There is also the question of how you define "asking". I would agree that requests of the form "give me X" are bad form, but providing suggestions to new users as to how they could receive more/better help, or even that they should vote/accept answers seems reasonable, and yet could be construed as "asking for payment" – Peter Duniho Oct 16 '15 at 20:10
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    @Peter: It is asking for remuneration for answering the question. "I'll answer you if you compensate me with reputation for doing so" is a clear request for remuneration, and it's in direct opposition to the basics of these sites. The comment (which has been deleted, so no one can see it now) didn't say "You should add a bounty to try and get help"; it said "I can answer if you give me a bounty". That's clearly asking for payment. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 20:17
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    @Servy: No, I have no problem with users voluntarily offering a bounty to direct attention to their question, and I have no problem with someone receiving a bounty that was voluntarily offered. I have a problem with users who ransom their answers by demanding a bounty be offered in order to receive their help, just like I would have a problem with a police officer demanding that I pay them for offering assistance when I was being assaulted, or an EMT demanding cash before rendering assistance to my injured family member. Coercion is inappropriate, particularly here. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 21:58
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    (continued). Actually, I'm somewhat surprised by your comment. From previous remarks you've made (both here and at the main Meta), I know you understand the basic premise of these sites, which is to create a knowledge base of shared knowledge. Sharing does not mean offered by coercing something; sharing means freely imparted here. I strongly feel it's inappropriate here to see a user struggling with a problem and not receiving help, realize you have the ability to help them by sharing your knowledge, and then deciding but only if I receive special compensation first. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 22:03
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    And I never said it was against the rules. I said it was inappropriate. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 22:04
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    @KenWhite Your analogies are completely inappropriate. It's an obligation of police to assist you if you're being assulted, or for an EMT to help you if you're injured. They're of course already being paid to do that work. SO users are volunteers who are under no obligation to do anything. A more applicable analogy is a street performer who only actually plays a song when they are paid, rather than one that plays for free but with a tip jar. You might prefer the latter, but the person is entirely within their rights to do the former, even if you think that it's tacky. – Servy Oct 16 '15 at 23:40
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    @Servy: You're right about my previous analogies being incorrect. A more appropriate one would be a volunteer in a soup kitchen agreeing to serve a meal to a homeless person only if they paid them something first. If they're here to volunteer, they should do just that-volunteer-rather than attempt co coerce payment for performing the service they're here to volunteer. It's pointless to offer to volunteer when you're going to demand compensation first for doing so. It violates the spirit of SE, even if it doesn't violate the stated guidelines. And yes, I said inappropriate. It is, IMO. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 23:44
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    @Servy: Wait. You're the one that said SO users are volunteers, and now you're switching to not everyone answering questions on SO is a volunteer. Which is it? You're sounding like a politician, talking out of both sides of your mouth. Unless the person answering the question is a paid SE employee, they are a volunteer. While a reasonable expectation might be to receive an upvote or an accept for providing an answer, expecting payment before doing so is inappropriate. Your remark about paid employees in the soup kitchen is irrelevant, as I specifically mentioned a volunteer worker. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 23:57
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    @Servy: And even in the case of those paid workers in the soup kitchen, it would still be inappropriate for them to demand payment from that homeless person before serving them their meal. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 23:59
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    @Servy: OK. I guess we agree to disagree. The question asked here was whether the conduct was appropriate, and in my opinion (and as I answered) it is not. If someone is here because their job compensates them for it, then they're already being paid. If they're here for the rep, they're here for the wrong reasons in the spirit of the stated goals of SO.I'd be embarrassed to use my SO rep as a resume point and then have a potential employer find a post where I said I can help you, and will do so only if you offer a bounty first, and I'd certainly hold that against someone applying for a job – Ken White Oct 17 '15 at 0:25
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    @Servy: Damn, you find the most interesting ways to (wrongly) twist what I say. I never once said earning rep is against the spirit of SO. I said that demanding the rep from a user before helping is inappropriate. Earning rep is just that-doing the work and (possibly) being rewarded for doing so afterward. Coercing someone before offering the help is what I'm objecting to, and I find it difficult to see why you can't comprehend the difference between those two things. You think gamification is the wrong path, and yet you encourage coercion in order to increase the game points? – Ken White Oct 17 '15 at 0:32
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    FWIW, the Supreme Court ruled that police officers are not obligated to protect you. Not really relevant to the topic at hand, but not common knowledge. – Chris Baker Oct 17 '15 at 0:33
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    @Chris: It is in fact irrelevant to the discussion (we've agreed my analogy was inappropriate), but the link you post does not say they have no obligation; it says they do not have a constitutional duty to do so. There's a difference. The constitution may not require them to protect you, but the terms of their employment certainly do. – Ken White Oct 17 '15 at 0:36
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    @Servy: OK..We're at the point of your telling me what my moral point of view should be. I think we're done here. Thanks for the discussion. – Ken White Oct 17 '15 at 0:42
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    Perhaps "coercion" was too strong a word, but the point remains that someone was being pressured into doing something they were under absolutely no obligation to do, for totally unjustifiable reasons. (Not pinging because I have no interest in discussing this further, just wanted to acknowledge said word choice.) – BoltClock Oct 18 '15 at 16:32

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