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I was just reading a post from the Matlab section, it was a perfectly good question, the OP was clearly new and does not have much experience with Matlab, but he provided enough details in the question, and answered ambiguous points when I commented. So I thought it was an "Okay" question and wrote an answer to it.

Seconds before I was about to post my answer, it was down voted (as often we see, when a "noobish" question gets posted, it could get down voted quite fast) and the OP deleted the post.

So the question is if the OP is actively engaged in clarifying his question (editing it as comments suggested - and clearly wants an answer), maybe down votes on the question should be hidden so he is not discouraged?

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    Deleting a question on seeing the first downvote doesn't seem like something an OP "actively engaged in clarifying their question" would do. If anything it shows a lack of interest, or disillusionment. – BoltClock Sep 30 '15 at 10:00
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    Hide them all they want, their reputation will still go down. Personally, if i get downvoted, it encourages me to improve my question/answer – Sayse Sep 30 '15 at 10:00
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    If the questioner is not interesting in creating a Q+A that will be useful to other programmers then there isn't that much you can do about it. You avoid having your free time wasted by detecting when somebody asks a helpdesk question. That isn't usually very difficult. Don't forget to also edit a question when you see obvious problems with it btw. Or upvote it when you think it is a good start for a lasting Q+A. – Hans Passant Sep 30 '15 at 10:06
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    Counter-proposal: if a question from a new user is quickly downvoted, can we hide it from the rest of the site as to not discourage answerers from opening new questions? – CodeCaster Sep 30 '15 at 10:28
  • It seems that everyone has forgotten where they came from and how they learned. Maybe some needed a professor to hold their hand and others do it on their own. Many users here are not very nice at all. So I wonder why they are even here at all. Is it for their own rep here? To boast on how much of an expert they are? The point here is to help people, not down vote them and discourage them from learning. – Beengie Dec 2 '15 at 21:47
  • Just look at how nice people were just on the subject? I bet there have been up votes to counter even more down votes... ridiculous. – Beengie Dec 2 '15 at 21:49
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First off, whether they are new or a veteran, you should be treating every user the same - it will only delay the inevitable when bad content suddenly starts becoming downvoted just because the user is no longer "new".

Downvotes shouldn't be hidden because it is a clear indication to a user that there content needs improvement.

How would you determine whether an op is actively participating or just delivering something like the following?

@Sucker - Pls hlp it important

@VampireVictim - It urgent

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The down votes are there to signal a problem with the post. The behavior of that user is exactly what we want, either edit or remove the post.

If you are certain that the question has value and isn't a duplicate you could start with an edit, up vote or a comment to show your interest and correct understanding of the question. That signals to others: this question might have value. It should prevent any passer-by down votes.

You have a little bit more time to prepare, test and post your answer. After you have done so you can check again if the question needs an edit to clarify things.

When you're sure all is good remove any comments that are too chatty.

On the other hand if you can't answer (so your first evaluation was wrong) you can flag to close the question, probably as unclear what you're asking.

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    You shouldn't be upvoting a question because, even though it's of low quality, it might possibly be edited into a question that would have value. One should be voting on the posts actual quality, not its potential quality. – Servy Sep 30 '15 at 13:17
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    @servy I think I didn't say anywhere that you should start with an up vote, right? The actions I describe, where one of those could be an upvote, are there because you're going to answer that question, which I assume, is good enough to be answerable. I know you rather down vote everything and the room I'm frequently in is told to stop doing that. So I try to see if I suggest up voting stuff makes my life any better here....guess not... – rene Sep 30 '15 at 13:23

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