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I recently asked a question on Stack Overflow, to which there are currently no answers. It related to some work I was doing for a client.

Since then, I've discovered the answer to the question. However, since it was work done for a client [*] they asked that if I put the answer on Stack Overflow, I should add a line saying "This answer was [insert term here: sponsored by / was found while doing work for / IP allowed to be shared by] Company Name."

Is this appropriate on SO?

I have no problem with it personally, but I'm worried that it may seem like advertising or spam, or that someone will see it and misinterpret it in future including editing it out, or that it's simply inappropriate for the site. On the other hand SO itself has sponsored tags, so there is clearly room on the site for some corporate involvement.

[*] Actually I discovered the answer in my own time, after work was concluded, for my own curiosity / satisfaction. The client still wants their name attached though. Let's ignore that for the point of the question.

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    Well, the company should be aware that doing so would make them look pretty awful... it would certainly put me off a company, to some extent. – Jon Skeet Sep 25 '15 at 13:36
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    I'm worried that it may seem like advertising or spam - well it would be advertising; that's the point of sponsorship. Also, why would you want to put a client name on any work they didn't pay for? – BSMP Sep 25 '15 at 14:09
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    @BSMP He asked us to assume, for the sake of the question, as if this is work that they did pay for, even though in reality it's disputed as to whether this content falls under the terms of their agreement. From David's perspective, of all that the company wants is a citation in order for making the information freely available publicly, it might not be worth disputing it further. – Servy Sep 25 '15 at 14:11
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    But, did the company really sponsored your answer? If not you could just mention that it was done for a project for So and so company I wonder if that changes the context. – Just Do It Sep 25 '15 at 14:13
  • @edrodriguez I'd be quite happy with that wording. – David Sep 25 '15 at 14:14
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    If you had gotten an answer to your question, and that helped you on the project, would you have reached out to the author of the answer and offered some of your fee for the job? – TZHX Sep 25 '15 at 14:30
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    @Servy It was on my own time, but it's not something I would have looked at had I never been contracted to do so. So it is related to the contracted work. I value my relationship with my clients and if the client in question feels that my finding the answer is related to our contract, regardless of whether I charged for the specific time in which I found the solution or not, I respect that. – David Sep 25 '15 at 14:33
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    Just wondering, why is the client even aware of your question? Whether you found your solution in a book, on SO, or sacrificed a goat to Ba'al, they should be interested that you found a solution, not how you found it. – Aaroninus Sep 25 '15 at 17:53
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    Should we interpret the up-votes on the question as agreement with the idea or as just "this is a good question"? – BSMP Sep 25 '15 at 20:48
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    I have a feeling the general opinion would have been different here had you not used the word 'sponsored'. You could've cited the company as a source instead. – duci9y Sep 26 '15 at 9:35
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    @duci9y It would have been nice had people read the intent of the question. I didn't feel "sponsored" was incorrect. People just jump to immediate reactions - which is human. – David Sep 27 '15 at 8:39
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    I have edited the question. – David Sep 27 '15 at 8:45
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    This kind of credit has no place on Stack Overflow, it is noise. If posted as a requirement for publication, it would likely be in violation of the CC license under which all content here is posted. As a workaround, your employer could consider having an account of its own, although I'm not sure what the consensus on that is - there's a big discussion somewhere on Meta SO or SE about it – Pekka 웃 Sep 27 '15 at 9:08
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    @Pekka웃 Why is it noise? I'm not disagreeing, but I'm asking in order to prompt you to explain your belief. Re the CC license: that is an interesting thing no-one else has mentioned yet. I'm not sure it applies since there since it requires attribution - which after all is what this question is about! – David Sep 27 '15 at 18:10
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    @David it's noise (IMO) because it's attributing not an individual person whose research effort the answer was, but the "owner" of the intellectual property, and we simply don't do that around here. That's my own gut feeling but I'm fairly sure it's in line with the community's. Re the license - CC does require attribution when content is reused, but it is clearly spelled out how that is to be done in the context of SO: through a backlink to Stack Overflow and the author's profile there. – Pekka 웃 Sep 27 '15 at 19:49
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I'd say that it wasn't acceptable.

It's likely to get you down-voted or even get the post flagged as spam.

If they aren't happy with you posting the answer without their name attached then simply don't post the answer. Hopefully someone else will make the same discovery you did.

The sponsorship of tags is done through Stack Overflow and money changes hands so it's all above board and sanctioned. The "sponsorship" of answers would be unofficial at best.

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    That's what I was wondering. Counter-arguments: SO has sponsored tags, so there's some room on this site for corporate involvement or recognition already. A correct answer is not spam, even if it says "the work was done for X"; it would be mis-flagged. Losing correct answers goes against SO's ethos, so preventing posting answers because a company wants it clear they are related to it doesn't seem to match the site. I touched on these in my question. Any thoughts? – David Sep 25 '15 at 13:54
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    A correct answer is not spam, even if it says "the work was done for X"; it would be mis-flagged. - But it's still noise and would be edited out. – BSMP Sep 25 '15 at 14:04
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    @DavidM "the work was done for X" is spam if the only reason it's there is to get the company's name on the page. At best, it will probably be edited out. – Bill the Lizard Sep 25 '15 at 14:05
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    @BSMP It's not noise. It's a citation. It's a necessary statement, legally. It's more or less the same as a citation for a quote. It's saying that the user posting the content is not the owner of that content. Excluding the information would be a violation of SE's licence agreement. – Servy Sep 25 '15 at 14:06
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    @BilltheLizard It's not "the" reason (I understand your concern if it was, but that's not the case here.) The answer wouldn't be there without it. Ie there's a difference between posting an answer solely in order to get a company name somewhere, and this, which is posting an answer but acknowledging the source. – David Sep 25 '15 at 14:07
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    Chris, I'd expect to be able to phrase the statement in a way that makes it clearer that it's not spam, since it's not actually spam after all. I agree that the proposed wording doesn't convey its intent all that well. – Servy Sep 25 '15 at 14:08
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    @DavidM If they're not letting you post the answer without their name attached, then I don't see how that's not the reason for the answer. This smells bad to me. – Bill the Lizard Sep 25 '15 at 14:10
  • It's not noise. It's a citation. @Servy - Then why isn't the name of the client already in the question? – BSMP Sep 25 '15 at 14:13
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    @BilltheLizard It's not conceptually different from someone not letting you post a quote from their programming blog on SO without citing it as being from them. From the perspective of the company they paid for this work, and thus they are the owners of that content, not David. Citing the true owner of the content you post, when it is not yourself, is a well established practice. This is a bit of an unusual case, but I don't see it as shady in any way. – Servy Sep 25 '15 at 14:13
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    @Servy Then they should post the content on their site and host it there, and we can cite it properly. Just posting a bare sponsorship in SO answers does seem shady to me. – Bill the Lizard Sep 25 '15 at 14:15
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    @BSMP Apparently because the company doesn't hasn't claimed ownership of it, or because they don't care about the question and are freely giving up claims of ownership of it? Who knows. Conceptually if they asserted their claim then this issue would indeed apply to the question just as much as to the answer. – Servy Sep 25 '15 at 14:21
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    @BilltheLizard let's continue this discussing in chat – Servy Sep 25 '15 at 16:02
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I believe it is acceptable to tag them as the source. Stack Overflow itself is released under an Attribution-ShareAlike license so if you share Stack Overflow content you would mention them as a source. This is just another case of indirection: your employer/client is the source and you just attribute the answer to them. Not being able to attribute content would be kind of hypocritical.

Editing out that attribution would itself be a breach of the contract you have with your client so in that case SO would be spreading pirated content. If that is the case you must refrain from answering in the first place, which would be bad for this site since we would miss your valuable answer.

Just don't make it look like advertisement.

  • This seems a very reasonable view. – David Sep 28 '15 at 19:12
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I think we should ask lawyers about that (disclaimer I am not one). In France, there is a difference between patrimonial property that ends to the client - he owns the application including source and can use and modify it at will- and the intellectual property that remains to the developper - he can reuse algorythms and methods for any other work.

IMHO, the kind of questions normally asked on SO and their answers should fall in second category: it is not a constitutive piece of an application (client ownership) but more a technical knowledge (developper ownership). So you should be allowed to post the answer on SO without asking your client - only your own manager.

That being said, in many commercial relations, client is right because if he is dissatisfied with something, he will no longer want to pass new commands...

  • But whether or not the client actually owns that bit of knowledge, which is irrelevant here, they would like it acknowledged it was discovered because of them. That's fair: it's attribution. – David Oct 3 '15 at 20:03
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I'd say that this is an acceptable practice if done correctly.

That correct way is to create a secondary account, e.g. David M working for X and use that. All the "marketing messages" can go on its profile page.

Pekka correctly brings up CC licensing. You can't force licensees to copy the marketing messages, but the attribution of the answer remains (i.e. to company X).

Downside: no rep for your main account. Consider it the cost of working for company X. And of course, don't vote on your own contributions.

  • This breaks the rule of 1 account per user. – NathanOliver Sep 28 '15 at 17:42
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    @NathanOliver There's no rule of 1 account per user- It's advised against, but not strictly prohibited so long as you are not using two accounts to do things you could not with one. (Voting for yourself or evading a ban of any kind, for instance.) As a reference, see this answer, specifically the second paragraph. – Kendra Sep 28 '15 at 18:54

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