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User stories:

As a user who posts a question, I would like to have the ability to show that one or many answers to my question was not satisfactory to me, and that I would welcome other users to add additional answers to my question.

As a user who answers questions, I would like to have the ability to see when a user has received a reply, but who is not yet satisfied with it.

For the sake of both these two parties. I think it would be beneficial for the user to be able to mark an answer, instead of just rating or commenting on it. I.e displaying it in another color, or somehow making it stand out. It would be beneficial for both these two types of users.

Downvoting an answer would not show up in the listing page, nor would commenting that it is not useful either. What would be good is a way to see that a question that has received one or many answers, that the OP is still actively looking for an answer. Right now the only way to determine that is by looking at the OP's rep.

closed as unclear what you're asking by davidism, HaveNoDisplayName, Anthon, Patrick Maupin, user4151918 Sep 24 '15 at 18:57

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 16
    This is already covered by bounties, voting, and commenting. – Bill the Lizard Sep 24 '15 at 17:42
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    If you're not satisfied with an answer, you can downvote and/or leave a comment to explain why you're not satisfied. To show you're still looking for other answers, don't accept one, and edit your question to specify what you're still looking for. A simple "unsatisfactory" mark, without a way to specify why, would not be particularly useful. – Jeffrey Bosboom Sep 24 '15 at 17:44
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    No it isn't. Downvoting an answer won't show up in the listing, and most low rep users won't even be able to down vote without losing rep themselves. Commenting doesn't show up in the listing page either. You would have to click on it to find out. – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 17:45
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    Enough people have qualms about casting anonymous downvotes that it's hard for me to believe that a "your attempt to help me didn't help" sign, credited by design to the asker, would gain much traction. I understand the impetus for the suggestion, however. – Josh Caswell Sep 24 '15 at 17:49
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    @JoshCaswell: You do realize that for low rep users, casting downvotes cost rep? Even the most ridiculous questions have +1, and sometimes a valid question has -1 – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 17:56
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    Downvotes cost rep no matter how much rep a user has. Ideally, you earn that rep back too, when the answer is either deleted for quality issues or edited for correctness at which point you can change your vote. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 17:57
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    Saying "I don't want to use the tools made available to me because I don't want to temporarily lose the occasional point" is not useful. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 17:58
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    Downvoting an answer always costs the voter 1 rep point, regardless of the voter. Downvoting a question never costs the voter, regardless of the voter. No votes on Meta.SO either cost or grant rep. – Josh Caswell Sep 24 '15 at 18:01
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    Dude, Down votes on Meta are an' indication of that people disagree / doni't think the feature is needed / useful. – Epodax Sep 24 '15 at 18:01
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    If you're downvoting answers, not questions, on Stack Overflow, not Meta, and you're not losing reputation, then please file a bug report. – Josh Caswell Sep 24 '15 at 18:04
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    I'm really unclear about what problem you seem to have about / think there is for low rep users. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:06
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    I don't find your feature useful / needed because I believe it isn't a high enough issue to warrant the time and resources needed to develop this, further more I believe it would have a more negative impact than a positive one because some (or many) will feel that the "No useful answer found" is hurtful ("So, my answer isn't good enough for you?!" - Which then might lead to "FINE! Then I just won't ANSWER!") - Which will then defeat the purpose of SO. – Epodax Sep 24 '15 at 18:07
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    But you do, as I explained in my answer: if they accepted an answer the count is highlighted green. If it's not, then stop worrying about the op so much and worry more about the question. Your complaint seems to be "I won't know whether to answer the question until I look at it", which is exactly what you should be doing. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:10
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    Then you would add a bounty, making it visible on the bounty tab. Or you would edit the question to clarify what you are looking for, making it visible on the active tab. Despite your insistence that "many users behave this way", you present no evidence to back that up. Additionally, you should understand that SO is not meant for the immediate gratification of the op. If good answers take a while to show up, so be it. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:18
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    Opinion is not a good motivation for a feature request, data is. See shog9's explanation of how to make a good feature request. I would also advise that you not stoop to insulting users, especially since many of the users on meta are the most active users on main. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:26
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All of this is already covered by existing features or actions you can take.

Show that an answer is not satisfactory: don't accept, possibly downvote, leave a comment explaining why it didn't help. The cost of a downvote will be reimbursed when the answer is deleted for quality issues, or you can undo your vote once it is edited for correctness.

Want additional answers: add a bounty which adds it to the bounty tab, or edit the question to clarify what you're asking which bumps it on the active tab.

See when a user is not yet satisfied: questions with an accepted answer highlight the answer count with a green box, look for questions without it.


Based on these comment threads, however, it seems like you're just not sure how to evaluate what questions to answer.

You should not evaluate which questions to answer based on any of the following: number of answers, whether an answer is accepted, reputation of op, continued presence of op.

You should answer questions which are well asked and which you feel have not been answered satisfactorily. Yes, this requires more effort on your part, but that effort to evaluate the quality of existing posts is what makes Stack Overflow a valuable resource.

  • 2
    Yes but there are so many users, especially with low reputation, that don't accept valid answers. Downvoting an answer does not show up in the listing page. – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 17:44
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    Worrying about the op at all (beyond deciding that they've asked a good question), is missing the point of Stack Overflow. They are simply one user in a target audience of millions. Write good answers to good questions. Upvotes from the community are more important than accepts from the single op. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 17:54
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    If your answer is THAT good, you'll get upvotes, no matter what the OP has done. If that is an on-topic SO question, that is. People visit good on topic questions, and upvote answers on the merit of the answer. Even if the OP has his solution, wouldn't you want to make the Internet a better place by posting a good, be-all end-all answer when you can? – Patrice Sep 24 '15 at 18:19
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    @dan-klasson actually... it does. Stack is all about quality questions, for the NEXT user with the same problem. I don't think we should answer bad questions (some users even downvote good answers on bad questions. I don't go that far, but I can still understand that sentiment). It's commendable you want to help everyone, but not very realistic or scalable to a site the size of Stack. – Patrice Sep 24 '15 at 18:25
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    @dan-klasson but again, you focus too much on the guy posting his question. Realize that the best questions on stack are those that were seen by THOUSANDS of people who went "omg that was useful!" For THOSE visitors, a better answer is ALWAYS beneficial. Also note in my comment I didn't talk about the actual score of the question, only its quality. Yes some people vote in weird ways (or Tim REALLY needs to get ahold of his keys...), but that's another discussion – Patrice Sep 24 '15 at 18:30
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    @dan-klasson if the op is too lazy to mark an answer as accepted, what makes you think they'll mark another one as not acceptable or not satisfactory? – Kevin B Sep 24 '15 at 18:35
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    @dan-klasson this is part of making a feature request. The feature HAS to be hit on all sides to make sure it holds water. If it doesn't hold water, it likely won't get implemented. This is a normal, healthy process for deciding if a feature is worth having or not. There has to be a damn good reason for a feature request to go past being a feature request. – Kevin B Sep 24 '15 at 18:36
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    Kevin B has it exactly right, the argument that "Users don't mark answers accepted, so we need a way to say they aren't satisfied" is fallacious. If a user doesn't know enough to check the green check mark, what makes you think they will know to hit the red X (or whatever we use for this feature)? – BradleyDotNET Sep 24 '15 at 18:37
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    @dan-klasson Stop insulting people on meta, PLEASE. In any case, you realize that answering a question viewed and appreciated by THOUSANDS helps a lot more than ONE OP, whose question will not be searched? If you truly want to help, use Pareto. Put 20% of the effort where it'll have 80% of the effect – Patrice Sep 24 '15 at 18:37
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    @dan-klasson So because people care more about the entire rest of the world than just the one person asking the question means that they don't want to help people? Sorry, but no. You're being told that what you're trying to do isn't actually as effective a means of helping people. Yes, helping just one person that you build a personal relationship with and that can pat you on the back might make you feel better than writing a quality answer to a generalized question that helps tens of thousands of people with a problem they couldn't solve, but the latter is actually more helpful. – Servy Sep 24 '15 at 18:38
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    @dan-klasson I won't even answer that part of your comment, as I sincerely find it a bit insulting that you infer intentions to me like that (plus it's ENTIRELY irrelevant here, so it's just an ad hominem point). In any case, Stack was never meant for the guy who wants a solution ASAP. It was meant for long lasting Q&As. If OP wants a solution NAO... he can hire a consultant, hit a chat room, go on a discussion board that doesn't care for quality? Stack became the success it is because it's so hellbent on quality. – Patrice Sep 24 '15 at 18:48
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    @dan-klasson You're the one who's trying to assert that the people on meta don't want to help people and you do. I'm not saying that you aren't trying to help people (just that you could do a better job of helping people by adjusting your perspective). – Servy Sep 24 '15 at 18:48
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    Why the hail would it be a bad thing for Patrice to answer questions about the product he's paid to work on, @dan-klasson? It would be freaking awesome if SO had more vendors providing concise, useful solutions to problems with their products. – Josh Caswell Sep 24 '15 at 19:02
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    @dan-klasson why do you think he doesn't? I feel like this line of discussion is not helping further your actual feature request. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 19:25
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    @dan-klasson seriously, why is this suddenly turning into an ad hominem attack about me? You say that "users on meta are all like that" do notice I never attacked anyone, I just explained how stack works and how little your Feature Request would change that. YOU are the one constantly attacking people.... In this debate, even though you started it, you seem so far the most toxic participant – Patrice Sep 24 '15 at 19:26
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There's answers, but I'm not satisfied with them:

enter image description here

There's answers, and I'm satisfied with one of them:

enter image description here

What you're asking for can already be seen. If an answer is not accepted, odds are that it's not what question's OP is looking for.

  • 2
    Read my post again please. It's written in simple English. Sometimes you have 0 votes and 3 answers which none have been accepted yet. How do you know if it is a user who hasn't bothered to accept, or simply one that's looking for another answer? You either have to look at the rep or click and read it. – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 18:32
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    @dan-klasson Read How to make a good feature request It's written in simple English too. If you won't even bother in reading what the question is about or how it has been formulated, why would you want to see the information you're requesting on question listing? Either way, you have to click the question if you really want to know details. – Just Do It Sep 24 '15 at 18:36
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    @dan-klasson using "there's an accepted answer" or even "there's already an answer" is not the right way to decide whether to answer a question. Answer a question if it is a good question and if you feel that the existing answers are not satisfactory. The behavior of the op should not factor in at all. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:36
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    Additionally, looking at the rep of the op is a terrible metric. How do you know if the op "can't be bothered to accept" or just hasn't been around (not everyone hangs out on SO 24/7 or even more than once a week), or isn't ready to accept but is still invested? Again, it shouldn't matter, but you really need to re-think how you're evaluating questions. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:38
  • WORD @davidism, protecting low-rep users from rep-racism – Just Do It Sep 24 '15 at 18:39
  • @edrodriguez: Oh, I am sorry. I didn't quite find that page "how to make a good feature request", especially since the title of the "question" was "Can we talk about the voting culture here on Meta?". Not really FAQ material. Seriously, what's up with people like you on META? – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 18:49
  • @davidism: Exactly, how would I know? Or perhaps the OP is around and is patiently waiting for an answer, and has already commented on each answer. There is no way of knowing. Hence my feature request. – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 18:51
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    @dan-klasson my point is exactly that you don't know and shouldn't care. The op's responsiveness should not be a factor in deciding which questions to answer. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:52
  • @dan-klasson I wouldn't expect you to have seen that post by shog9, since I agree it's not obvious how to find it, but I had come across it again recently and it was relevant, so I pointed it out. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 18:55
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    @dan-klasson please calm down, it seems like you've missed the point of what I said. Your sentiment that you want to help others does not conflict with mine that you should not worry about whether the op is responsive. A good answer to a good question will help many more people than just the op. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 19:02
  • @davidism: I'm super calm. That's just the way I talk. And my feature request doesn't conflict with your UI experience on SO either. – dan-klasson Sep 24 '15 at 19:07
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    @dan-klasson Stack Overflow is a site for professionals and enthusiasts. While it is great to be passionate about your ideas, please keep that passion to a level that remains professional when speaking. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 19:10
  • @dan-klasson when participating on meta, recognize that it is not the same dynamic as when participating on main. Users participate on meta to discuss how the site works, so of course they care about fully understanding any feature requests that indicate that someone is not satisfied with how the site works. However, they can only meaningfully discuss features requests that are well researched. If they feel a request is unclear, they will discuss in order to clarify, and they will vote based on their agreement or disagreement. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 19:21
  • @dan-klasson also recognize that active participants on meta are also active on main. Their participation here does not effect their participation there, although the two may be positively correlated. – davidism Sep 24 '15 at 19:22
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    Helpful like the 650 answers that davidism has posted on SO (compared to 20 on Meta)? Or like the 3,000 answers that Servy has posted? Or what? – Josh Caswell Sep 24 '15 at 19:36

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