6

This question already has an answer here:

Consider this answer.

The user seems to promote his/her own toolkit as a response to the question.

Even the profile description of the user says that moderators have flagged/deleted posts in the past.

How should one deal with such posts? Flag? If yes, then what? If not, what then?

EDIT: Even though I now know about the user's history, I would still want to know as to how to deal with such posts.

marked as duplicate by Siguza, Anthon, HaveNoDisplayName, gnat, Luke Sep 19 '15 at 11:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

22

To summarize from @Pekka's great research (and the Help Center), using "you" for "the user who posts links to their software":

  • Mods don't go on a hunt. They only act on flags. If multiple users flag multiple of your posts, you're under suspicion.
  • If a "huge percentage" (59 is considered huge) of your posts mentions or links to your product, you're under suspicion.
  • If your answers don't actually answer the question, but touch a tangentially related subject only to end your post with "... so see my product, that can do that", you're just being a spammer.

The latter point seems to be the case with this particular user's posts. But I'm no expert in the subject of most of their posts, so I wouldn't flag them.

What irks me with such posts is that they read like an advertorial. "What other products can't do...", "Our product can do this...", while not delivering any concrete evidence that it can or how one would do so. It's just promotion, not an answer to the actual question.

  • 1
    Hi Code. It's difficult to see, in the specific answer linked above, the "advertorial" feeling you complain about in your final para here? Is there a danger that what you're saying is close to just saying "oh I don't like that guy's style" or "he's an annoying writer" ?? – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 13:01
  • 4
    In their post, they are describing what their product does. In that they are not answering the question with that, they are writing an advertorial that search engines will index and relate to their product, while not helping OP in the slightest, other than saying "buy our product". I don't consider that a good answer, especially if there are alternatives - in which case the answer could be "use a tool". Like I said I don't know much about this particular subject, so I'm not going to vote or flag, I'm just saying it reads like an advertorial and doesn't really answer the question. – CodeCaster Sep 18 '15 at 13:01
  • 1
    I just see it as a general discussion about how to handle syntax, parsing etc - on the context of mentioning the product. Many people participate on SO, to build a profile, for no other reason at all than to promote their own position as a software engineer (the "looks good on your cv" effect) - and that's fine. (I suppose.) It's hard to see the problem with "single issue" posters, unless one is just really opposed to anything that "even smacks of" commercialism you know? Anyway - cheers – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 13:11
  • 3
    I don't know what you've got against anti-commercialism, but there's nothing wrong with that. Allowing self-promotion (even while this is one of the more or less positive examples, I've seen way worse) will open up the floodgates of utterly horrible spam (yeah slippery slope). Nobody likes spam, so the majority of users opposes self-promotion. – CodeCaster Sep 18 '15 at 13:14
  • You're right, life is a democracy, and as I just mentioned in the other comment, it's the case that here on SO there is a general anti-commercial vibe, even an extreme anti-commercial vibe. It just seems to me rather irrational, you know ... it's a similar vibe to when BP engages in "greenwashing" ... dotcom startups are the most ultra-capitalistic of things: they rely on the most abstracted-out concept of ultra-commercialism: selling stocks based on a multiple of nothingness. So for me rabid, if you will, anti-commercialism on a pro-sumption site is an anachronism, it's weird. Anyway. – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 13:22
  • 13
    I've got nothing against commercialism. I'm a freelance, I sell my services and my software. I've got a Careers profile and a link in my SE profile. That's all I do to promote myself on the SE network. I don't litter 2/3rds of my answers, which I post to carefully chosen questions, with links to my products. That's the difference. – CodeCaster Sep 18 '15 at 13:33
  • 1
    No worries - you've made your point and as I say, the vast majority of meta users agree with you – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 13:43
-6

To answer your question, you should answer this question:

Would you mind if a free, open source software is proposed as solution?

Question: How can I keep various versions of a source code file?
Answer: git is a software versioning and revision control software that allows you to achieve exactly that.

If you think this is a valid answer, then it can't become not-an-answer by replacing git with BitKeeper or ClearCase. If there are two answers, one with git and one with ClearCase, feel free to upvote the git answer, because it's free.

  • 1
    Such a question is too broad and off-topic anyway (software recommendations, or "list-question"). If the question is "Which version control system supports feature X" (though still bordering on off-topic), and a particular commercial system does offer that, it's a fine answer. An analogy making more sense in this situation would be questions asking something like "How can I merge two branches in SVN?", and Linus would come and post "Use git, it's way better!" under every such question. I don't think that would be appreciated as well. – CodeCaster Sep 19 '15 at 10:15
  • 1
    @CodeCaster The question stated "promote his/her own toolkit as a response to the question". If a toolkit as response is valid, then his toolkit is valid as a response, too. Whether a toolkit response is valid at all, is something completely different. Both cases are explained in my answer. Your proposed analogy is bad, because it's obvious that any toolkit as answer would be invalid, as the question is about a specific one. – John Hammond Sep 19 '15 at 10:20
  • Again, software recommendation questions are off-topic ("What tool can do X"), so they should not be answered at all - let alone with a link to your own product. If the question is "How can I do X", and there is a tool that can do X, you may post that answer, keeping the guidelines in mind that I posted in my answer. In this particular case, it's a tool that you have to contact the company to get a quote. It's not freely available, no trial to be downloaded - so the answer says "Contact us to buy our solution to your problem". That is not an answer to the question. – CodeCaster Sep 19 '15 at 10:35
  • 1
    @CodeCaster Again, what does it matter whether my example question conforms to the SO guidelines or not? It's an example, this meta-question is about good answers, not about good questions. As an example my example question is simple and easy to understand. Exchanging the example with a SO conforming question does in no way improve the answer. – John Hammond Sep 19 '15 at 10:42
  • I think you're missing the point, or I'm not getting yours. If the question should not be on SO, according to the currently active rules, made up by the founders and community discussion, it should not be answered. The answer may be a correct answer to the question, but the question (as you phrased it, not talking about the question linked to by OP) is not welcome on the site - so neither is the answer. – CodeCaster Sep 19 '15 at 10:44
  • 1
    @CodeCaster A tool does not become a valid answer by being free. Plain and simple. You are saying:"Well, it's a crappy answer, but at least it's free crap, so it's okay to keep this answer." I strongly disagree with this. As we have opposing point of views neither is going to change, we can end this discussion. – John Hammond Sep 19 '15 at 10:48
  • I'm not talking about free versus commercial anywhere. Software recommendation questions are off-topic and should not be answered (again, not saying that this is the case for the linked question, but to address the statement in your answer), whether the suggestions in the answers are free or not. Anyway sure, let's agree to disagree. (I did not vote on any other answer here, just to make that clear). – CodeCaster Sep 19 '15 at 10:51
  • 2
    @CodeCaster If a question should not be answered, then it doesn't matter in which way it should not be answered, all ways are equally bad. We agree on this at least (hopefully). But seriously, people already don't get that the downvote button is not a disagree button, so fine details are lost to them anyway. – John Hammond Sep 19 '15 at 11:01
  • Yes, on that we agree. Votes on Meta are for (dis)agreement though. :) – CodeCaster Sep 19 '15 at 11:01
-25

I can't see the slightest problem with this. It's no different from a Facebook staff member, say, answering questions about Facebook. Or when someone who made a package which is free on git usefully and in detail answers questions about the topic.

The actual answer in question is incredibly informative, packed with technical information. To describe it as "spam" is just totally wrong.

There seems to be a strange sort of extreme anti-commercialism, sometimes, on SO - bizarre give that the entire raison d'etre of SO is to make a startup and sell it off. Like any other commercial enterprise or startup.

"I would still want to know as to how to deal with such posts." It's difficult to see what your actual problem is with the post, OP? Every single page on SO, 100%, has "ads" for SO (for their annoying job sites, etc) - are you against that in a similar way? What specifically do you object to or are you worried about??

  • 11
    "It's no different from a Facebook staff member, say, answering questions about Facebook." - yeah it is. If a Facebook staff member answers a programming problem with code, the problem is solved. This answer just promotes a product, that you need to purchase (prices not listed on the site) while the answer does not show how one would do that with the promoted software. As for your edit - how SO runs their business is their decision, that doesn't mean they should let the users do the same on their platform... – CodeCaster Sep 18 '15 at 12:48
  • 1
    code? few questions are specifically about code (most FB questions are along the lines of "where do you enter the damned id number..." etc) The question at hand is a very general one ("can you do it with a syntax tree..." etc). Any answer (like the one in question) would be along the lines "a human has to enter the grammar..." etc. your non-squitor "prices not listed on the site" ? you're providing an example of my cliché of vague anticommercialism. – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 13:08
  • 13
    I don't like your discussion style nor your ad hominems, so I'm gonna refrain from answering that comment, apart from saying software support does not equal software promotion. – CodeCaster Sep 18 '15 at 13:10
  • Fair enough, anyway "it's your site" - the people are with you as it were. In general terms voting support is for "your" point of view here, so - that's the way the cookie crumbles. – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 13:15

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .