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It seems to be possible to gain a massive amount of rep just by asking a very simple but popular question (e.g. when your question is voted up as highly as this question) without contributing very much in the way of actual answers and expertise.

Should there be a cap on how many points you can earn for just asking a question, or is there already a cap?

Edit: I would not describe it as "laziness" as the duplicate suggests, but it seems unfair that popular, low skilled questions can earn higher rep than unpopular, high-skilled answers. But that's just the way it is, I guess. Life isn't fair .

I certainly think that person should get rep for asking a useful question. Nor do I begrudge the simplicity of the question. I am only comparing two ways of contributing and suggesting that one way is more important and should be reflected in the final score awarded. If you consider that the score may reflect whether an employer considers you competent in whatever skill the site is about it seems unbalanced (although I acknowledge that servicing employers is not the sites primary goal).

I was just curious whether or not it could be done better. Anyway, based on the downvoting and answers, I'll let it go.

marked as duplicate by gnat, rene, πάντα ῥεῖ, Anthon, HaveNoDisplayName Sep 15 '15 at 16:25

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    There is a daily cap for all rep gained (excluding accepted answers), otherwise i see no point in capping the total rep you can gain from a question. If it's useful, it's useful. – Kevin B Sep 15 '15 at 15:59
  • Well, have you had a look at the date? – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 15 '15 at 16:19
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    I would be happy if there was a daily cap on rep awarded to my questions - e.g. to the first 200 or so upvotes. It would not stop me from asking questions. But one thing I did not properly consider before asking this is that the rep score is not meant to reflect one's competence in a skill area as much as one's overall contributions and usefulness to the site. In which case, it is fair to have a stronger incentive for the posting of good questions than if it was meant to be an indicator of skill level. – authentictech Sep 15 '15 at 16:46
  • "... is not meant to reflect one's competence in a skill area as much as one's overall contributions and usefulness to the site ..." Often coincides though. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 15 '15 at 16:52
  • Not convinced it is a duplicate, as the linked question (which is also closed as a duplicate of another question) related to newbie posts. There are plenty of questions out there of questionable value that gain rep purely because they pique the interest of the audience, e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/7825055/what-does-the-c-operator-do My feeling is that questions should have a rep cap (possibly set by mods based on documented criteria), and similarly answers to those questions. – SmacL Mar 20 '16 at 11:17
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Should there be a cap on how many points you can earn for just asking a question, or is there already a cap?

You can only earn 200 reputation points per day from upvotes. That helps counteract questions that get some publicity and are massively popular for a few hours or days.

That said, I agree with Kevin B - "If it's useful, it's useful." If you manage to ask a question that will be useful to lots of people over time... then you've made a good contribution, and that's what we want to encourage.

I don't like the idea of people getting enough reputation from one question to have real moderation privileges without having to consistently participate in the site, but in reality these cases are rare. Let's design for the 99%, not the 1%.

Some of these useful-over-time questions are very simple - but I would argue that the problems that developers encounter most are simple.

  • I certainly think that person should get rep for asking a useful question. That was never my issue. Nor do I begrudge the simplicity of the question. I am only comparing two ways of contributing and suggesting that one way is more important and should be reflected in the points awarded. My concern is that someone could ask one simple question and get thousands of rep points but another person who answers several questions well gets much less. If you consider that score here may reflect whether an employer considers you competent and whatever skill the site is about. – authentictech Sep 15 '15 at 16:10
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    @authentictech answers actually receive more rep per upvote, so i don't see how you can make that argument. Unless, you mean an answer only gets that many if it's a huge answer, in which case yeah that sucks, but... it's still about usefulness at the end of the day. – Kevin B Sep 15 '15 at 16:13
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    Yes there's greater weighting given to answers than questions but at the end of the day it still seems unfair that popular, low skilled questions can earn higher rep than unpopular, high-skilled answers. But that's just the way it is, I guess. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/202652/life-isnt-fair . I was just curious whether or not it could be done better but based on the downvoting I'll let it go. – authentictech Sep 15 '15 at 16:21
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    @authentictech Okay, time for some hard data: Only 31 users have achieved more than 2000 reputation (which is really where moderation privileges start) with fewer than 5 questions and 0 answers. See data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/364408. – Undo Sep 15 '15 at 16:24
  • And that actually doesn't change when considering deleted posts too. – Deduplicator Sep 15 '15 at 16:59
  • @Undo Thanks. That is a very helpful point. – authentictech Sep 16 '15 at 17:50
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    @Undo, agreed "if it's useful, it's useful", but what if it is just popular but of questionable value, e.g. this little gem from the C tag, stackoverflow.com/questions/7825055/what-does-the-c-operator-do To my mind it makes reputation more of a popularity contest than one that relates to adding value. – SmacL Mar 20 '16 at 11:22
  • @ShaneMacLaughlin Really, reputation is a popularity contest. Anything that requires humans to rate things (without onerous objective rules) is probably going to end up as a popularity contest, with a few (very few) extreme cases. I'd agree that reputation is flawed in this way, but I'd disagree that is flawed enough for us to need to do anything about it. – Undo Mar 20 '16 at 13:37
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    @Undo, fair enough, though I wonder whether with a little more tweaking could the rep statistic provide some level of indication of the amount of value a given user has brought to the community. Like many here, a number of my big rep earning answers and questions are pretty mediocre, whereas what I'd consider my better input being of niche interest is relatively low scoring. – SmacL Mar 20 '16 at 14:57

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