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This question already has an answer here:

I thought that the answer to this question was an obvious "no". But these three users, all with much more experience on StackExchange than I have, evidently disagree. They each use very similar language to claim that their posted content is licensed under something other than the CC-BY-SA. For example:

User claiming to relicense to CC0

The major identifying parts have been blurred as a minor courtesy, in case the user decides to alter their profile and they do not want this version trivially associated with them. Anyways...

The "dedicated to the public domain" link in the above image points to the Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication 1.0 license (CC0). All three users linked use the same "All original source code I post" phrase in their profile text, though not all of them "relicense" to the CC0.

Is that allowed? Can a user apply a content license other than the default CC-BY-SA, simply by stating so in their profile? If not, can they do it any other way?


EDIT to differentiate from the proposed duplicate:

The proposed duplicate's accepted answer's infographic shows that the content is published by the original author, somewhere other than SO. That's a fairly specific condition and I'm not sure how it changes answers to my question.

Specifically, the CC0 does not require attribution. Say someone (Not the original author. Maybe a StackExchange laywer?) wants to legally pursue a clearly copied-from-StackOverflow snippet of code that is published elsewhere without attribution, but the original snippet author has a CC0 license clause like the one above. Is that copyright case now invalid because of that author's clause, even if that author hasn't published it himself elsewhere?

Alternative, simpler phrasing: if the content is not published anywhere else, but the user claims a CC0 license, is attribution no longer required?

marked as duplicate by Louis, Aza, Andrea, Luke, Racil Hilan Sep 8 '15 at 22:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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  • I'm surprised that didn't turn up in my research before asking this question. It appears to be a conceptual duplicate, I just didn't play the keyword lottery right. – kdbanman Sep 8 '15 at 21:10
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    After some thinking, the discussion in that related question didn't completely address my concern. The accepted answer's infographic shows that the content is published by the original author, somewhere other than SO. That's a fairly specific condition and I'm not sure how it changes answers to my question. See my edit. – kdbanman Sep 8 '15 at 21:31
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    Not sure if actual, physical republication would be required for the alternative license to apply. Would be an interesting question for a law expert – Pekka 웃 Sep 8 '15 at 21:58
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You certainly can license your content under any license you like, posting it on stackoverflow only implies that it is also licensed under CC-BY-SA.

It is still your content, and there is no requirement of exclusivity in that license. Sell it, give it away, it is all yours.

Licensing your code under an additional license does not change the existing license, but if the second license includes all the rights of the first license, and no additional restrictions, then this effectively means that the first license is irrelevant, in matters regarding only your code.

A public statement that all your code is licensed as such-and-such is usually seen as sufficient to grant others this license.

So yes, users can license their code on stackoverflow simply by making a public statement, for example in their profile.


Regarding your edit:
Yes, having proof of permission from the owner of the content is sufficient defense against copyright infringement (and usage of the code without observing a particular license is simply copyright infringement. The cc-by-sa license does not force you to attribute, it just means you can be sued for copyright infringement if you do not attribute).
It would be different if stackoverflow demanded an exclusive license or otherwise forbid re-licensing, but they do not.

Though I do think this is a very theoretical case anyway, as it is very unlikely that Stackoverflow would legally pursue someone who copied some code from only one particular user, without any other content from stackoverflow themselves or other users. For one thing they would have a hard time to show how they, stackoverflow, have been damaged, and have standing (ref1, ref2).

Unless the "clearly-copied-from-stackoverflow" in your question implies that the copied snipped also copied the layout or surrounding page content, which is obviously still owned by stackoverflow themselves.

  • "posting it on stackoverflow only implies that it is also licensed under CC-BY-SA". So if the content is not published anywhere else, but the user claims a CC0 license, is attribution no longer required? – kdbanman Sep 8 '15 at 21:35
  • @kdbanman see edit – HugoRune Sep 8 '15 at 22:06
  • That's really clear. This part is especially helpful: "It would be different if stackoverflow demanded an exclusive license or otherwise forbid re-licensing" – kdbanman Sep 9 '15 at 2:48
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[insert standard IANAL disclaimer here]

Can a user apply a content license other than the default CC-BY-SA, simply by stating so in their profile?

Not exactly. A user can apply a different license to the material they bring to Stack Overflow, but the CC-BY-SA license still applies to the content published through SO.

Releasing works in the public domain would allow people to use it without attribution. My understanding is that if the information was released into public domain through a different source, such as a blog, that the content could then be used without attribution. However, works published only on the Stack Overflow site must still be attributed to Stack Overflow, regardless of what a user profile might say.

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