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When searching the top questions upvoted questions on a android device, it incorrectly shows question scores larger than 10k as 1k, example screenshots below:

On mobile (should display as 12K instead of 1,2k): Mobile screen shows question score as 1,2k

On desktop: Desktop pc shows question score as 12K

Link to question, it has 11898 question score at the moment of writing:

Why is processing a sorted array faster than an unsorted array?

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  • 72
    They should name this as the 1.2k problem – Bhargav Rao Sep 8 '15 at 15:46
  • 10
    Funny bug. I see how this would slip through during testing. – usr Sep 8 '15 at 19:54
  • 7
    They just group things every μύριοι, ܪܒܘܬܐ, רבבה, 萬/万, 万/萬, 만/萬, หมื่น, or the like. Seems like a reasonable standard to use. The k is, however, a typo. It should be myria and a prefix. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 8 '15 at 20:19
  • 14
    Duplicate of duplicate? meta.stackexchange.com/questions/259662/… – Rolf ツ Sep 9 '15 at 9:38
  • 1
    @Rolfツ By the number of upvotes, the others would be closed as duplicates of this now :P – Siguza Sep 10 '15 at 15:40
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    @Siguza the point is that bug reports about the Android app should be posted to the SE meta not the SO meta. So this post is actually out of place. – Rolf ツ Sep 10 '15 at 15:43
  • 1
    Finally a good unit for Asian language speakers! (Yes we separate numbers in ten-thousands not thousands.) – Derek 朕會功夫 Sep 10 '15 at 18:25
  • 3
    I would prefer 1.2e4 anyway. :) – Trilarion Sep 10 '15 at 21:48
  • 1
    If it were 100 000 to 1k, then we could just do 1L. – Andrew Grimm Sep 10 '15 at 23:16
3

This will be fixed in 1.0.79.

Formats won't exactly match the web because it has a more complex multilingual number formatter with four different modes for different part of the site. The app just has one function that gets used everywhere.

public static String miniNumber(double number) {
    if (number > 10000000) {
        return new DecimalFormat("0m").format(number / 1000000);
    } else if (number > 1000000) {
        return new DecimalFormat("0.#m").format(number / 1000000);
    } else if (number > 10000) {
        return new DecimalFormat("0k").format(number / 1000);
    } else if (number > 1000) {
        return new DecimalFormat("0.#k").format(number / 1000);
    } else {
        return new DecimalFormat("#,###").format(number);
    }
}
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