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Just curious: what is the average vote on accepted answers?

I don't know if this number is easy to retrieve, I have no querying skills. I'd be interested in upvotes-downvotes, but upvotes only would be ok. My guess is nearly 1, maybe slightly below, but, who knows.

This is part of a bigger question of mine - what is the average reputation you get from answering and being accepted. I'm wondering how much does it differ from 25.

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    I'm guessing you completely overlook the factor of time. The older the post, the more likely it had a chance to get votes. The tag matters a great deal as well, [android] is particularly notorious for lame voting. An expert like CommonsWare only gets 1.25 votes per post within a month. Which is probably what you should aim for. – Hans Passant Sep 3 '15 at 17:22
  • @Hans my experience in [android] might have influenced my guess score, however I was interested in a general result. I'd be curious to know how deep is the influence of time on the result (leave aside the fact that if we set a time restriction 3.77 goes down to 1.5). For instance, the older the post the more likely it had a change to get votes could imply that, over years, and despite it being a very robust mean, this average 3.77 is growing, because all of us' aswers are getting older and older. – natario Sep 3 '15 at 17:56
  • On the other hand, there might come a time for each answer to be obsolete, and thus not searched and upvoted anymore. In that case 3.77 would be still, because each answer would have a (somewhat) fixed lifespan, which is like imposing a time restriction to the query. Who knows. (I'm talking about years passing of course, and I'm misusing some terms for the sake of brevity). – natario Sep 3 '15 at 17:59
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    You actually probably would be more interested in something like 50th (or/and 95th) percentile. – n0rd Sep 3 '15 at 21:55
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    @n0rd: it looks like (I don't understand what the query does) 95th percentile is 11 – jfs Sep 4 '15 at 17:53
32

According to a SEDE query, the Average Accepted Answer Score is 3.77.

This is good enough for a rough estimate, but if you really want to know how much reputation an accepted answer gets on average, you'd want to join the Votes table to get upvotes and downvotes. Since upvotes on an answer are worth +10 and downvotes are worth -2, they do not balance each other out.


@Bergi asked in the comments for the median accepted answer score, since that will probably be a better representative of what the average accepted answer score will be than the mean. I wrote another SEDE query to get the Distribution of Accepted Answer Scores, which gives the frequency of each answer score. I then loaded that data in R to find that the median score for accepted answers is 1.

dat <- read.csv("data/AcceptedAnswerScores.csv", header = TRUE)
dat2 <- rep(dat$Score, dat$X)
summary(dat2)

     Min.   1st Qu.    Median      Mean   3rd Qu.      Max. 
  -59.000     1.000     1.000     3.771     3.000 16970.000 

From this data we can also see that there are 5,642,233 accepted answers (over half of the 10 million questions on Stack Overflow, not too shabby), and that half of those have a score of 1 to 3.

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    I got 3.77 data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/359156/… It's overly verbose SQL (since I'm not that pro with SQL), but I think it's accurate. – ryanyuyu Sep 3 '15 at 12:49
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    @ryanyuyu: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/revision/359164/463297 gives something similar (3.7708221195402603). – Matt Sep 3 '15 at 12:52
  • @ryanyuyu Am I losing precision by not doing cast(score as float)? – Bill the Lizard Sep 3 '15 at 13:01
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    Yes I think so. Since the type of the column is an integer column, avg returns the same type. I actually googled this and found a SO question on that. – ryanyuyu Sep 3 '15 at 13:02
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    More accuracy by casting to float: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/359172/… – Deduplicator Sep 3 '15 at 13:03
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    @ryanyuyu Of course there's an SO question about that. :) – Bill the Lizard Sep 3 '15 at 13:04
  • Much higher than I thought, this means that for an average answerer it takes 5-6 answers to reach the reputation cap. Thank you guys. – natario Sep 3 '15 at 14:47
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    @mvai keep in mind that this is average score for all accepted answers, including some really old high scoring answers. You might add a date restriction if you are interested in the typical accepted answer now. – ryanyuyu Sep 3 '15 at 14:56
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    @mvai: You should have a look at the distribution of the scores. Also, the median is surely way below the average. – Bergi Sep 3 '15 at 21:58
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    @Bergi yes, my guess for the median would be 1, maybe 2. Don't know how to check though. – natario Sep 3 '15 at 22:12
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    @Bergi Here's the Distribution of Accepted Answer Scores. It does look like the median is 1 or 2. – Bill the Lizard Sep 4 '15 at 0:11
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    I wonder if there's actually scope to scale some of the rep rewards based on average-tag-score. It seems a shame to penalise experts in niche areas. – Sobrique Sep 4 '15 at 9:52
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    It's interesting that the two worst answers from that (both with over 65 downvotes) are from two users who both have over 490k reputation. Surprised they haven't deleted those... – James Donnelly Sep 4 '15 at 10:00
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    For those who are wondering: Q1 is 1, median is 1, Q3 = 3. – blagae Sep 4 '15 at 10:08
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    @JamesDonnelly: Probably because they'd have needed to flag those for mod attention as an accepted answer can't be deleted? – Harry Sep 4 '15 at 10:16
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I don't really know SQL, but if we run this query on SEDE we can get narrow results than the overall average:

select tags.TagName, 
    avg(cast(answers.score as float)) as avgScore,
    stdev(cast(answers.score as float)) as stdevScore
from Posts answers
join Posts questions on answers.Id = questions.acceptedAnswerId
join PostTags ptags on answers.ParentId = ptags.PostId
join Tags tags on ptags.TagId = tags.id
where
  questions.postTypeId = 1
  and answers.postTypeId = 2
  and questions.acceptedAnswerId <> ''
 group by tags.TagName
 order by avg(cast(answers.score as float)) desc

we get some fascinating numbers in terms of which tags have the highest-score average accepted scores. On top:

  1. 937 +/- 1322.29
  2. 526 +/- 1054
  3. 448
  4. 325
  5. 314.89 +/- 2287.1

Although my personal favorite:

  1. -3

If we reduce it down to the tags that actually get questions though, let's say 25,000, then we get:

  1. 12.66 +/- 110.53
  2. 6.73 +/- 43.52
  3. 6.56 +/- 98.81
  4. 5.56 +/- 30.09
  5. 5.54 +/- 12.95
  6. 5.32 +/- 22.19
  7. 5.31 +/- 29.6
  8. 5.24 +/- 20.4
  9. 5.11 +/- 32.85
  10. 4.72 +/- 39.4

with the worst ones being:

  1. 2.48 +/- 9.75
  2. 2.38 +/- 13.67
  3. 2.24 +/- 8.27
  4. 2.09 +/- 7.48
  5. 1.45 +/- 4.4

Fully one-third of wordpress accepted answers are 0-score. That's kind of amazing. And not just lowest average, lowest stdev. Just consistently nothing. The most consistent is with an average of 3.09 and an stdev of just 5.44. android, despite having a reputation for lame voting, is about average - ranked 41 with 3.56.

Age obviously makes a difference. So let's check out the top 20 tags for several different timeframes (the top 20 per timeframe, not overall, to avoid skew):

+===========================+==================+=============+===================+
+ Last Month  | 1-12 Months | 1-3 Years        | 3-5 Years   | >5 Years          |
+-------------+-------------+--------------------------------+-------------------+
| c++    2.49 | c++    2.46 | c++         3.25 | ruby   6.11 | python      15.37 |
| r      1.90 | c      2.40 | c           3.16 | python 6.02 | javascript  14.98 |
| arrays 1.82 | r      2.09 | ios         3.03 | c++    5.53 | c           12.48 |
| regex  1.72 | swift  1.83 | objective-c 2.93 | c      5.35 | objective-c 12.31 |
| c#     1.67 | python 1.70 | .net        2.92 | ios    5.10 | java        11.91 |
+-------------+-------------+------------------+-------------+-------------------+

Interestingly not much of an increase for several years. Clearly all the questions since 2012 just suck.

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    Are those values really standard deviation or are they in fact variance? The numbers seem huge compared to the mean. – Bobulous Sep 4 '15 at 22:45
  • @Bobulous It's standard deviation. – Barry Sep 5 '15 at 1:44
  • @Bobulous The high standard deviation values are probably due to the skewness of the data. Answers (particularly accepted answers) tend to get extremely highly upvoted a lot more often than they get extremely downvoted, so this data is skewed high. The median and IQR are probably better measures of the center and spread than the mean and standard deviation. – Bill the Lizard Sep 5 '15 at 21:08
  • As for time factor and tag comparison, I guess we could divide each answer's score by the number of years it has been around, and then make statistics. – natario Sep 5 '15 at 23:21
  • Would you happen to still have the link to the query for questions over 25,000 answers? I tried finding it in SEDE but you could have done the research days and days earlier than this post (which means lots and lots of pages of revisions). Thanks! – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp Feb 19 '16 at 14:51
  • @Plutonix Hehe, you mean tags with over 25,000 questions? Just add a HAVING clause at the end. – Barry Feb 19 '16 at 14:55

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