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I have been working in email marketing for a while now and it seems that anybody and everybody who has spent a weekend reading a book on HTML 5 feels qualified to answer questions about this very specific and intricate problem domain of making emails render the same in 50 different combinations of browsers, operating systems, email clients and with different email service providers.

I don't have the clout to knock down the baddies... should I make an effort to comment on wrong answers that are highly up-voted?

(This is often not a question of right and wrong -- it is generally a pretty obvious example of someone confusing the problem domain of getting an email to render correctly in 50 different combinations of browsers, operating systems, screen sizes, and email clients with making a website coded in html 5 with stylesheets run nicely in major browsers).

e.g. I need to find the one person who can tell me that I need to front load my email with sacrificial conditional comments so that my real conditional comments render on outlook365.com. (It is now higher than 3 as answered elsewhere. I ended up needing 9 for my last one). I need the person who can tell me that blackberries like the alt tag to precede the img tag. I might need, perhaps, to find the guy who knows that #000000-colored links will turn blue in gmail, but #000001 will render as intended.

But I don't need someone to link me to the w3c specification of html 5 attributes... how would one handle this? There are specfiic sites for email only but they are not quite as trafficked and well... it's affecting my rep to be asking "dumb" questions, as well as perhaps polluting the community with bad answers when I can't curate them decently.

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    The best you can do with your rep is comment to explain why the answer is wrong. If you're frequently getting answers missing the point of your questions, edit them to try to make it clearer what you are really asking for. Constant missed answers could be a sign that the other users are actually misunderstanding your question. Once you have 125 rep, you can start downvoting answers that are incorrect.
    – Kendra
    Commented Aug 31, 2015 at 15:29
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    If you're having a hard time finding free help, consider paying someone with expertise in the domain.
    – user1228
    Commented Aug 31, 2015 at 15:49
  • @Kendra. Thanks for being serious about this. I understand that I can be misunderstood... this may be sometimes the case. However, this is a problem I note with a lot of questions regarding email coding. Quite often the answer that works in Litmus tests for 50 devices is 10+ answers down, and some html5/css3 response that wouldn't work in > 50% of clients is top voted. I'm trying to figure out what would make sense to remind people that the problem domains are separate.
    – sas
    Commented Sep 2, 2015 at 10:24
  • @Will I am a coder, not a hiring authority. I wish they would pay for more expertise. Telling people they need to pay for information is not only not constructive, it seems antithetical to the ethos of stack exchange. However, the perversity of your getting points for a response that in no conceivable world could be construed as useful or serious, to my actual question about how to deal with a problem domain for exchanging information, relevant to an enormous industry, demonstrates the importance of gamifying the rep system correctly to avoid rewarding poor quality responses.
    – sas
    Commented Sep 2, 2015 at 10:28

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I don't have the clout to knock down the baddies... should I make an effort to comment on wrong answers that are highly up-voted?

Yes, absolutely, if you see something that is wrong in an upvoted answer the best thing to do is to leave a comment explaining what is wrong. Preferably, the comment also provides some evidence (an example, a link to a bug report, a link to a credible/official blog post, etc.) to support the claim.

This may not end up changing the answer itself, if the author doesn't care to edit. The result may be a highly-upvoted answer with a highly-upvoted comment saying the answer is wrong, which at least protects those readers who pay attention. Such a comment can also help make others more confident about downvoting, who suspect the answer is wrong but aren't as sure of it as you.

I don't need someone to link me to the w3c specification of html 5 attributes... how would one handle this? ... it's affecting my rep to be asking "dumb" questions, as well as perhaps polluting the community with bad answers when I can't curate them decently.

To some extent this is just part of starting out on a site that requires you to build a reputation to be more effective. If you think your rep is a big obstacle right now, and you have the depth of knowledge about email rendering that you say you have, consider spending some time answering questions to establish your reputation before asking more of them.

But beyond that, each question you ask represents an argument you're making to the reader that your problem is real and significant. The range of skill, experience, patience and other attributes among your readers will be huge. So, try to think about ways you can write your problem statement that more clearly and unmistakably argues that you "don't need someone to link [you] to the w3c specification"—for example, by quoting the specs yourself to show you have done your research. There are many approaches, just keep in mind that people are busy and sometimes you need to be very patient and explain in a way that a novice could understand.

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  • This is a good answer and I appreciate it. I would only note that email coders are working on deliverables that cannot be publicly disclosed (at least until the email is sent) and much of the code affecting layout may belong to the company... so one would really have to be careful to do this, and circle back to answers weeks later (since vendors charge late fees and like to set things up very early we are often working weeks out on items). Not insurmountable. Just worth noting.
    – sas
    Commented Sep 6, 2015 at 0:37

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