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My SO question https://stackoverflow.com/questions/32127178/what-is-the-purpose-of-stdstringstream is on hold. I do not see how it is different from many other open-ended questions such as What is a smart pointer and when should I use one? and What are move semantics?. What is wrong with that question?

  • Using questions from 2008(!) and 2010 as "proof" doesn't justify much. The massive influx of questions means the standards have tightened since then (the second in particular would likely get shot down right away today). – BradleyDotNET Aug 20 '15 at 21:09
  • Rules have changed over the years. The examples you cite are much older when the rules weren't as strict. If they were asked today, they too would probably be shot down in flames. – Mysticial Aug 20 '15 at 21:09
  • Ok. The rules were tightened. Considering the number of upvotes on each of those, people found them very useful. Restricting such questions diminishes the utility of SO. – user2141130 Aug 20 '15 at 21:11
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    Why is this getting downvoted? It's a meta-question. – user2141130 Aug 20 '15 at 21:14
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    As such, you don't lose points. – Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 20 '15 at 21:15
  • "what other uses are there for stringstream" that looks like a pretty broad question to me. What limits the number of possible unique answers to that? – Kevin B Aug 20 '15 at 21:17
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    You were clearly told what's wrong with your question. Be happy having at least receiving a concise answer! – πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 20 '15 at 21:19
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    Right, but they're still not allowed anymore. I agree a lot of people found them useful, however, that doesn't change the outcome, for the same reason asking "What is the best javascript library" isn't allowed. – Kevin B Aug 20 '15 at 21:21
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    What you don't see are all the deleted answers said questions have. – Kevin B Aug 20 '15 at 21:22
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    I'm not gonna argue on whether the example questions you listed should or shouldn't be classified as "too broad". But what you don't see is that for every successful question that is "too broad", there are at least a few thousand that turn into complete trash and a moderation nightmare. So while tightening the rules means losing some valuable content, the site has decided that it's worth that sacrifice to eliminate the trash. – Mysticial Aug 20 '15 at 21:22
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    Meta questions like this attracts down votes because they seem to assume/suggest that the community at large made a mistake. A healthier starting point would be: What should I learn from this and can you guide me that learning process. – rene Aug 20 '15 at 21:24
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    @user2141130: If you say that those standards are wrong, the least you must demonstrate is a basic amount of research into why that's the standard now. Which would either have convinced you that you are wrong, led you to post a well-argued feature-request with references, statistics, and some novel arguments, or made you despair at you inability to formulate your brilliant new insight satisfactorily. – Deduplicator Aug 20 '15 at 21:39
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    @user2141130: If you say that those standards are wrong, the least you must demonstrate is a basic amount of research into why that's the standard now. Which would either have convinced you that you are wrong, led you to make a well-argued feature-request with references, statistics, and some novel arguments, or made you despair at you inability to formulate your brilliant new insight satisfactorily. Of course, you can also argue that the standards were incorrectly applied, though beware of picking the wrong kind of examples or whining, which both reduce your chances. – Deduplicator Aug 20 '15 at 21:49
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    In an emergency, you can replace a broken shoelace with a USB cable. – Martin James Aug 20 '15 at 22:00
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    There were. Look into the history of "Not programming related", and why it's no longer "SO's toilet-bowl". – Deduplicator Aug 20 '15 at 22:09
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I can only tell you the reason that I personally downvoted the question.

I downvoted the question because I believe that it is posed in such a way that it isn't going to have an answer that's useful to anyone, yourself included.

Stringstream like any language feature doesn't necessarily have a clear purpose that it's organized around, different programmers might use it for different things, in different situations, and in the future people might repurpose it in ways that we don't expect now. Or entirely forget about it, like many of the other standard library features that are mostly unused in modern code. The people who answer stack overflow questions can answer questions like "when would I personally use a stringstream", but that's basically just going to be opinion-based.

Suppose you asked a question like "what is the purpose of destructors", or "what is the purpose of references". You could say, "that's easy, destructors clean up objects", or "references allow you to bind aliases to objects without having to mess around with pointers directly". But what you are actually doing here is describing the function of the thing. Destructors can be used for lots of other creative purposes besides cleaning up objects. Describing common uses of references... I mean.. its just not a very interesting question or one that anyone will get much out of reading answers to.

If you had posed a question "what is a stringstream and what does it do" I would probably downvote that too. Why would you ask someone on stack overflow to regurgitate the documentation for you.

A better question would be organized around a clear programming goal. Or possibly along the lines "how in general do I do X", "(I tried using a stringstream but its awkward / I don't like it for the following reasons)"

Sorry but my opinion is that this question definitely deserved downvotes. I believe from your other writing that you already know quite well what a stringstream is and what its uses are, and the question feels like a place where no useful information will be shared and people will feel invited to have pointless arguments about whether C++ streams are better than C I/O etc. etc. I'm not saying that was your purpose but I think it's a reason to dislike the question.

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    It's a rubbish question. If it had been asked 4 years ago, it would have been a rubbish question then. Today, it's ++rubbish – Martin James Aug 20 '15 at 21:59
  • @MartinJames It's one more rubbish than it would have been 4 years ago? How are we quantifying a rubbish? – user4639281 Aug 20 '15 at 22:02
  • @TinyGiant you need to read the spec. – Martin James Aug 20 '15 at 22:04
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    @TinyGiant Notice the use of prefix increment rather than postfix. Martin is careful not to make unnecessary copies of rubbish. – Mysticial Aug 20 '15 at 22:04
  • @Chris Beck "I believe from your other writing that you already know quite well what a stringstream is and what its uses are". Nope, other than their peripheral use for string formatting I didn't know why one would use a stringstream. Now at least I know they can be used to simulate stdin. That is useful for me. – user2141130 Aug 20 '15 at 22:33
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    @Mysticial we have enough users to post rubbish and duplicate it anyway, I don't think we need Martin's help for that :P – Patrice Aug 20 '15 at 23:11
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You're referencing two questions that struck a nerve: they asked, in simple language, something that is implicitly asked daily by others struggling to get a handle on how modern C++ should be used. They attracted good answers that became immediately useful in explaining these topics to others.

Your question struck... a different nerve. No one found it useful, or thought you were trying to solve a real problem that you or anyone else working with C++ is facing. That's not to say there wasn't such a problem - but if no one sees it, you have to be explicit about it.

Always start with a real problem that you must solve. It may not always appear that others have done this, but chances are they have and that's why their questions are still around. Folks here know the difference between solving problems (even broad ones) and idle philosophical pondering; if they see more of the latter than the former, they'll politely ask you to come back when you have an actual question.

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