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This question already has an answer here:

So... I stumbled across a spammy-looking title:

Sense by Hello wakes you up feeling great, improves your sleep, and helps you learn how the environment of your bedroom affects your rest

and investigated the question. The title was edited by the OP himself and I rolled this edit back.

Investigating even further, the user defaced or spammed many of his questions. I wasn't the only one who noticed this.

Besides that I'm uncertain what to do with one parcticular edit - how should we deal with this in general? I rolled back all the destructive and/or spam introducing edits. But this seems like it can be a never-ending game, as the OP can just continue to introduce spam to his posts.

Are we supposed to flag the questions for moderator attention describing what's wrong with the edits, even after rolling back?

I don't want to not roll the edits back and just flag them as spam, because the questions may be absolutely valid for SO.

marked as duplicate by Paul Roub, Tunaki, user4639281, Anthon, JAL Sep 25 '15 at 16:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Flag one of these posts for moderator attention and point out that recurring behavior of the user. – πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 19 '15 at 12:01
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    If you notice a user defacing/destroying their own content (as is happening here) then yes, flag for a moderator and explain your suspicions. We can then take measures to prevent it continuing while we reach out to the user to establish what's going on. – Jon Clements Aug 19 '15 at 12:05
  • @JonClements I just clicked "flag question" the second you commented! So, in conclusion: prevent destruction by rolling back and flag them for moderator attention. – Basti M Aug 19 '15 at 12:07
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    This seems like the user's account might have been compromised... – MikeTheLiar Aug 19 '15 at 13:18
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    The user may just be pissed off with SO. It happens. Flagging it for moderator attention so the user can be contacted directly seems best in any case. – Carl Smith Aug 19 '15 at 14:40
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    "Sense by Hello wakes you up feeling great" - anything that has to wake you up is most definitely not contributing positively to your sleep pattern. Insert Deity Here, you can't even trust spam anymore. – Gimby Aug 19 '15 at 15:27
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    The user may have had his account compromised by a spammer, easy then to just edit existing questions posted by the legitimate user and turn them into spam. – Ben Robinson Aug 19 '15 at 16:09
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    I'm with Ben, judging by the edit timings and the frequency of it there is a very high chance this account has been hacked – Sammaye Aug 19 '15 at 17:08
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    We terminated their sessions just to make sure. Haven't heard back yet... – BoltClock Aug 19 '15 at 17:44
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In the first instance of someone reverting an edit, I usually try to explain to them why I made the edit, and why I disagree with them. If that doesn't solve it, then leave it alone or flag it for a moderator to come look at the situation. Getting involved in rollback wars is ultimately a waste of time.

If you encounter blatant defacing or vandalizing of questions or answers on the site, regardless of who does it, the appropriate action is flagging for moderator attention. Moderators can remove a user's ownership of a post, lock a post, put an account on timeout, etc., and are the best-equipped to handle such situations. In fact, that's their job!

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    Just to add, this seems to me like a potential case of somebody's account being hacked, so an account timeout might be exactly what's called for – StormeHawke Aug 19 '15 at 16:42
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    This particular does indeed look like a compromised account, but this answer is a more general approach to this kind of situations and imo more than valid. – Basti M Aug 19 '15 at 18:23
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    @StormeHawke, True, however another possibility is that it's simply a spammer trying to "sneak in a message". This likelyhood hoever decreases with post count (due to increased cost) and it might be better to assume good faith. – Pacerier Aug 20 '15 at 20:44

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