16

I ran into a fellow reviewer today who flagged a perfectly legitimate edit as spam/vandalism. That's a step beyond merely making a bad call about whether an edit should be allowed through, as that could mis-train the filter and perhaps mess up someone's account. So I looked through the last few pages of their review history and found several other instances of the same sort of mistake. Sometimes they marked edits that were dubiously applicable, but even on those, there's a definite difference between a merely unwise or excessive edit, and outright spamming or vandalism. And sometimes there seems no real reason to reject at all, like this OP-approved edit, or this typo fix, or this title fix, or this code import.

If I'm correct, I expect a diamond should gently correct their misconception of that rejection reason's purpose. Or, given the sheer number of these in the first, what, seven pages, perhaps a time off reviewing.

closed as off-topic by Travis J, Luke, HaveNoDisplayName, David Eisenstat, misterManSam Aug 5 '15 at 2:11

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – Travis J, Luke, HaveNoDisplayName, David Eisenstat, misterManSam
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 18
    If you mark everything as spam, you'll never fail the audit. Genius! – Rob Aug 4 '15 at 2:26
  • 2
    @Rob: I did think of that, but that's not the only rejection reason they use, and they do approve a fair number. – Nathan Tuggy Aug 4 '15 at 2:28
  • 26
    Thanks for bringing it to attention - it's been handled. – Jon Clements Aug 4 '15 at 2:33
  • 2
    @JonClements: Awesome! Can't complain about the response time on this! – Nathan Tuggy Aug 4 '15 at 2:35
  • 16
    Isn't this what the "in need of moderator intervention" flag is for. You don't need to call out a specific user on meta then either. – Ben Aug 4 '15 at 6:18
  • 9
    @Ben FWIW details provided here wouldn't fit into flag message (it's limited to 500 0r 600 chars). If it wouldn't be so, then I would definitely agree about flag being better option – gnat Aug 4 '15 at 6:58
  • 5
    @gnat A link to the user’s profile and one or two examples are normally enough when raising a moderator attention flag. This should never has been posted here actually. – idmean Aug 4 '15 at 13:29
  • 2
    @idmean not true in my experience. Even if something from the user in question can be flagged, a couple of external links and a bit of explanation (but not enough) soon sucks up all those characters. Too little for the mods, naturally "no evidence..." comes back. Big frustration. – Bill Woodger Aug 4 '15 at 13:32
  • 3
    @BillWoodger Well, in my experience every time I raised a moderator flag it was marked as helpful and the user was no longer able to continue (with whatever he was doing). And I always had enough characters. – idmean Aug 4 '15 at 13:39
  • 3
    @idmean an example: meta.stackexchange.com/q/229486/218565. I happened to be looking here when you posted your comment because I was considering a Feature Request to make the box bigger. It is limited to 500 for flagging questions/answers and 200 for comments. Fine for simple things, sure, but other than the "contact us" (which doesn't go to Mods (directly) anyway, there is no way, at times, of providing "enough" information. If you've spent a few hours investigating something, to be circumstantially certain, you want to be able to present that, not a post-it note and hope that a mod ha – Bill Woodger Aug 4 '15 at 13:45
  • 4
    s the same amount of time to duplicate your research. Irony intended, even if just a comment. – Bill Woodger Aug 4 '15 at 13:46
  • 1
    @BillWoodger: where I have run out of space e.g. when listing URLs of a voting ring, I've used a private Gist as a supplemental. – halfer Aug 4 '15 at 14:30
  • 3
    @BillWoodger ...another trick to consider is to use own deleted answer or question as a "buffer" to fill the data and then refer it in the flag message. I keep a bunch of tricks like that in my pockets for the case if I need to flag something that is both big and delicate. But frankly, reporting an outright review abuse doesn't look worth such trouble to me and I wouldn't hesitate to bring it to meta - just because it's simpler – gnat Aug 4 '15 at 14:41
  • 2
    @gnat Interesting. I like it, except I don't know who, and when, someone can see my deleted questions even without a link. Answers I assume that 10k+ who happen to look at the question it is on, would see it. Can 10k+ see it from my profile? Presumably I'd also get a badge for asking my first question, another for deleting it, another for editing it. I like the idea, and also want to know how to pick your pockets for other tricks :-) – Bill Woodger Aug 4 '15 at 14:47
  • 3
    @BillWoodger 10Kers can see deleted questions and answers, so you better use these for stuff that you just don't want to expose too wide. As for communicating truly sensitive stuff, "Contact Us" is hard to beat. I tried it once, works like a charm. By the way Jon Ericson has series of four articles describing how it works, quite interesting reading – gnat Aug 4 '15 at 15:05