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This question already has an answer here:

Since I've just gained full editing privileges, I started reviewing Low Quality Posts.

Sometimes, I encounter code-only answers like this:

To accomplish your goal:

int input;
int output = input + 2;

How should I review them?

Before asking this question, I decided to do the following:

  1. Add this standard comment I created:

While this code may answer the question, it would be better to include some context, explaining how it works and when to use it. Code-only answers are not useful in the long run.

  1. Edit to fix code formatting.

The problems are:

  • What does the Edit button do? Does it remove the post from the queue, like if it's good content? I don't want this, because it's still code-only.

  • If code formatting isn't a problem, which action should I take? I've always choosen to Skip, because I didn't want to save nor delete it.

  • This upvoted answer has been choosen for an audit I passed. It contains only code, but it has been evaluated well by the community.

marked as duplicate by gnat, HaveNoDisplayName, Luke, S.L. Barth, Glorfindel Aug 3 '15 at 18:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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While answers like these are not necessarily good answers, they are answers and they do not have "Severe formatting or content issues", so they are not Very Low Quality. The right thing to do when you're reviewing these answers is to select Looks OK.

If you feel so inclined, you could leave a custom comment detailing what you think the author could do to improve their post. There is no reason to delete this content.

As for the audit, while that answer does not include a real explanation, it is an answer and it does not have "Severe formatting or content issues", so it is not Very Low Quality. You did the right thing by selecting Looks OK.

My prepared comment example:

While this code block may answer the OP's question, this answer would be much more useful if you explain how this code is different from the code in the question, what you've changed, why you've changed it and why that solves the problem without introducing others.

* Obviously this comment should change if the question does not contain code.

  • Join the discussion. – Francesco Menzani Aug 5 '15 at 12:37
  • 1
    Just “the question” instead of “the OP's question” would suffice IMHO. It wouldn’t introduce the acronym which might be unknown to new users and is not necessary for this comment. – Melebius Dec 6 '17 at 6:45

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