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One of the main reasons that made me create a stackoverflow account at all was the urge to contribute to the community that provided me with so much useful information over the years and helped me becoming a programmer at all.

Besides to asking and answering on my own, gaining the ability to vote was one of the biggest improvements over being just an anonymous spectator.

When I search the web for information and I find a useful answer on stackoverflow, I now usually log in, just to upvote the answer that helped me solve my specific task at hand.

I recently found myself more and more of not just upvoting the answer but also the question that made it even possible for someone to spread his or her knowledge at all.

With the exception of some pretty cr*ppy questions, or questions that only have a "your-answer-is-elsewhere"-link in their comments, I'm starting to develop a habit here.


And now comes the question:

Isn't it fair to upvote the question that made it possible for someone to provide an answer that helped you?

The logic here is: if there wouldn't have been someone to ask the question in the first place, you would probably never have gotten the answer you needed - shouldn't that been rewarded in some way?

In fact, there is the famous question badge, which is rewarded regardless of the quality of a question just for getting 10k views...

Of course it takes a lot more effort to actually solve a problem than to create it, I think we are all on the same page here. ;-) But this has already been considered in the rep system, as upvotes on questions only provide you with 50% of the rep an upvote on an answer would be worth.

How does it come then, that there are usually noticeably more votes on the answer than on the question ?

  • It is more intuitive(?) to upvote the answer which actually gave you what you were looking for. I sometimes upvote an answer and forget about the question so I go back and upvote the question too, typically. But, yes, it is often good to upvote the question – codeMagic Jul 30 '15 at 17:17
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    Assess voting on the question as though it didn't have any answers. Is it clear, does it provide the necessary information, is it well formatted etc...There are some really quite bad questions that still manage to produce some great answers (hence the Reversal badge) - but just treat the question as though it was stand-alone. – Jon Clements Jul 30 '15 at 17:20
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    @codeMagic Not to mention that the upvote-button for the answer is right next to what you've read and helped you, while upvoting the question would involve heavy lifting like scrolling back to the top and stuff... ;-) – M463 Jul 30 '15 at 17:21
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    @JonClements Nice point! Unfortunatly, I've see a lot of three-liners, scoring 25 and higher while other well written, sophisticated and crystal clear formatted questions about interesting facts are rotting their time with zero votes. – M463 Jul 30 '15 at 17:24
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    @M463 just the way the wind blows now and again I'm afraid – Jon Clements Jul 30 '15 at 17:25
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    I would venture to guess that a lot of those "three-liners, scoring 25 and higher" are older posts when things were different. Though, it does still happen unfortunately. – codeMagic Jul 30 '15 at 17:25
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    Sometimes questions get upvoted because lots of other people have had the same problem, and therefore it's useful, as opposed to being an exquisite work of art. – Andrew Grimm Jul 31 '15 at 6:20
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Let me repeat @JonClement's comment here, because I totally agree with it and has the main point IMO:

Assess voting on the question as though it didn't have any answers. Is it clear, does it provide the necessary information, is it well formatted etc. [...] treat the question as though it was stand-alone.

Let me expand on this by going through your post.

Upvoting Questions to Answers that help you?

Myyess? :-)

Isn't it fair to upvote the question that made it possible for someone to provide an answer that helped you?

In general, if possible, +1 a question if it is a good one straight away.

However, usually you're not "browsing questions" but trying to solve a task. You may have forgotten to +1 the question(s) you've passed while trying to solve that. Assuming you always vote based on content's quality, I think all these are good / nice:

  • Go back after completing your task (perhaps with a certain answer) and if applicable +1 the answer's question too.
  • Heck, sometimes you've seen multiple questions when searching for a solution to your task. Score some RL karma by using CTRL+SHIFT+T or history to find all good questions and answers that helped you and +1 them afterwards.

But again: don't +1 a bad question, even if the answer helped you.

How does it come then, that there are usually noticeably more votes on the answer than on the question ?

Mostly I think because of the UX combined with how this works in RL: people are busy with their issue mostly, until they find a (potential) answer, and only then start to think about other things like upvoting content that helped. The upvote button of the answer that helped is still in sight, it's easy to hit it. It's much more effort to go back to question's that helped and +1 those, and usually folks want to quickly get back to their task at hand.

  • Metaphorically speaking, what's "CTRL+SHIFT+T"? – Andrew Grimm Jul 31 '15 at 6:22
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    The most helpful keyboard shortcut for browsers I learned the past 3 years: "Open most recent tab". :-) – Jeroen Jul 31 '15 at 6:24
  • When upvoting answers there even is (was?) a prompt that comes up to remind you to vote on questions too. E.g. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/194357/… – Jan Doggen Jul 31 '15 at 14:52
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I use to upvote questions I am willing to ask myself: if I am stuck on some problem, go to google, search it; ehi, someone had my same (or similiar) problem here on stackoverflow, let's see how did he solved!

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I'm pretty new, but I upvote the answers that help me solve my problem, and the question that provoked the answer (or it wouldn't be there), I think that's only fair. I also upvote questions without an answer for my problem if the question itself is relevant to my issue, call it solidarity for a fellow sufferer

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