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Earlier today, I ran across a question that shared characteristics of another question and was marked a duplicate. However, the question that was actually asked, "What am I doing wrong here?", was ambiguous as to whether the author was referring to the compiler error he provided (which if that had been the only content, it would have most certainly been a duplicate), or to the implementation details he provided, which was questionable as to whether it was a duplicate based on how narrow or wide a view that one used to approached the implementation.

I saw the intent of his implementation and concluded that he would have been possibly been led astray into thinking what he wanted to do was not possible with the answer to the duplicate. I knew however that there were an actual solution to his issue, and posted a partial answer in the comments. As it turns out, I was right, and the partial answer solved his problem and he ended up making his app work.

I had also commented to the user who marked the post as a duplicate, that I did not feel that it was a duplicate. The user responded that as written it was a duplicate. I disagreed with this and responded why. The original poster it seems then deleted the question.

For your consideration here is the first line of the question from Google's cache:

I am trying to achieve an abstraction in ASP.NET MVC with C#.

Here is the line I suspect which caused some to view this as a duplicate:

But C# says I can't implicitly cast it, etc...

And here is the actual question asked on the final line:

What am I doing wrong here?

And finally, here is the link to the Google cache of a much earlier version of the question page: Google Cache of duplicate question

So with that background established, and hopefully making this question unique enough not to also be marked as a duplicate as I did not see any satisfactory answers in my view of the likely duplicates, my question is:

What is the proper way to deal with a situation like this?

Should I have responded to the question with a comment saying something like: "I have an answer for you, but I need you to restate/expand the question in order for me to give it to you?"

Obviously responding to the question in a comment with a working solution did not prevent the loss of both the question and the solution relegating them both to the ether. So that probably is not the right way to go, but is it?

Or is there another way?

I think that a good compromise would have been to allow one to provide an answer which would only be visible to the original poster and those who marked the question as a duplicate and allow them to reconsider their stance. That way there may have been a chance to preserve the question and answer if the original poster had voted the answer up and marked it as the solution, using the existing safeguards against deletes.

marked as duplicate by jonrsharpe, Deduplicator, gnat, Luke, Community Jul 24 '15 at 16:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    BTW> My personal opinion is that withholding the answer and demanding that the poster expand/change the question seems like a jerk thing to do. It harkens back to a time for me when I was first learning how to work with Linux, and when the practice of asking questions on forums, while encouraged with friendly proclamations of "if you have any questions feel welcome to ask", was generally met with hostile responses like "RTFM, use Google and GTFO noob". – Tyree Jackson Jul 24 '15 at 15:51
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    "allow one to provide an answer which would only be visible to the original poster and those who marked the question as a duplicate" - that goes completely against what SO is trying to achieve. – jonrsharpe Jul 24 '15 at 16:00
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    (10K link) stackoverflow.com/questions/31605068/… – Deduplicator Jul 24 '15 at 16:02
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    As Jon said, "if the question were edited to not be a dupe, it would be reasonable to reopen it". Instead, the OP chose to delete it. C'est la vie, why waste further time worrying about it? – jonrsharpe Jul 24 '15 at 16:05
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    Helping the person who asks a question isn't the primary goal here. The goal is to help everyone who asks the same question later. This is why people are encouraged to search for answers first, and to edit questions that don't meet site standards (or are just duplicates). – Bill the Lizard Jul 24 '15 at 16:05
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    Should I have responded to the question with a comment saying something like: "I have an answer for you, but I need you to restate/expand the question in order for me to give it to you?" - You could have done the edit yourself. And we (as well as the OP) could agree or disagree that it preserves the OPs intent / makes it re-openable. – Deduplicator Jul 24 '15 at 16:06
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    Did you not see this question that was posted an hour before you posted this one? – user4639281 Jul 24 '15 at 16:55
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    @TinyGiant Clearly, I did not, otherwise, I would not have posted this question. I checked the list of suggested duplicates and reviewed ones that looked promising before posting this. So this was not an ignorant posting. What was the point of your question? – Tyree Jackson Jul 24 '15 at 16:57
  • @jonrsharpe "that goes completely against what SO is trying to achieve." As opposed to just losing the question and answer entirely? Ok, how about "...visible to everyone and those who marked the question as a duplicate get an extra special notification that a non-duplicate answer was posted and accepted despite the duplicate flag allowing them to reconsider..."? – Tyree Jackson Jul 24 '15 at 18:01
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    @Deduplicator "you could have done the edit yourself. And we (as well as the OP) could agree or disagree that it preserves the OPs intent / makes it re-openable." Thank you. I was not aware that such an action would be considered appropriate SO etiquette. I'll remember that in the future. – Tyree Jackson Jul 24 '15 at 18:03
  • If you can still add answers, what's the point of putting it on hold?! The OP was told what they could do to get the question reopened, and chose not to do it, despite evidently knowing that they could get an answer for it if they did so. That's all. – jonrsharpe Jul 24 '15 at 18:10
  • @jonrsharpe That's fine if the OP didn't just accept the answer from the duplicate which was "you cannot do that" and applied as the answer to their overall design, when it only answered part of their question. I suspected that they were being led astray if you will and would have given up on their solution. Think about it, you get told by one of the most revered users on this site that their question is a dup, and the answer to the dup is you can't do that. That does not seem right to me. – Tyree Jackson Jul 24 '15 at 18:17
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As you identified a specific problem that was different from the one in the question being marked as duplicate (and apparently the OP did not bother to logically identify it as so, since he did delete the question), with the information you have gathered, and the solution that solved his problem, you can create another question, answer it yourself and mark it as solved.

This seems the right way to proceed, since others may have that same problem and therefore, they will be able to solve it with your explanation. You can also provide the other question's link (the one marked as duplicate) and briefly justify why it is different.

Optionally, you can also give credit to the user that originally came up with the question by placing a link to the cached result in Google, as you have shown us.

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    This is exactly what I ended up doing. Thanks! – Tyree Jackson Jul 24 '15 at 16:49
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    That's certainly also a good way to go, as it's rather hard to get the OP of the inspiring question to undelete. If the new question is really no dupe, and one doesn't want to waste the work. – Deduplicator Jul 24 '15 at 21:26

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