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This question already has an answer here:

Here's a feature request I would like to discuss about on MSO. You all know that being up-to-date in the field of programming is essential.

Therefore, I would like to suggest a feature: would it be possible for reputation points to vanish out during time?

Here's my thought: a 300k-rep user might have gained all his reputation points thanks to an old version of a programming language and not be up-to-date to all new technologies. In consequence, his reputation level might not reflect his true skills at the moment.

I don't have the algorithm on top of my mind yet but we could imagine something like:

  • accepted answers points last 2 years
  • upvotes points last 1 year

Therefore, old contributions that are no longer active and don't receive upvotes anymore would have less impact on the reputation level than other active topics.

All of this in order to have the reputation level to truly reflect the current skills and not outdated ones.

marked as duplicate by gnat, John Conde, HaveNoDisplayName, Artjom B., Unihedron Jul 22 '15 at 23:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Old versions of software, languages and technology are still in use, in some cases there is still code use that is several decades old so old knowledge can still be very valuable. – Joe W Jul 22 '15 at 20:44
  • I would expect this to simply change the values, not much more. high rep users will still be high rep, because their old questions are still receiving upvotes. – Kevin B Jul 22 '15 at 20:45
  • @KevinB: Sure, if questions are still useful now. But what about old ones that are outdated? – D4V1D Jul 22 '15 at 20:47
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    How do you determine if a question is outdated and no one can gain useful information from it? – Joe W Jul 22 '15 at 20:48
  • @JoeW: By upvotes. If old knowledge is still valuable, it will still receive upvotes, therefore maintaining the reputation level. But old outdated questions would have therefore less impact on the reputation. – D4V1D Jul 22 '15 at 20:48
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    knowledge being valuable does not mean the question/answer will get a lot of traffic or votes. Or just because it is useful to a small group doesn't mean it isn't valuable. – Joe W Jul 22 '15 at 20:49
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    See also Legacy code and cobol. – ryanyuyu Jul 22 '15 at 20:53
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    My primary issue with this is if we're going to expire votes, we're also expiring downvotes. I have less of an issue with the upvotes expiring, but, only expiring one without the other seems wrong too. – Kevin B Jul 22 '15 at 20:54
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    @KevinB Good point, some people might gain rep from expired votes. – Joe W Jul 22 '15 at 20:56
  • Expiring downvotes making gain points is something I haven't thought about. Very good point. – D4V1D Jul 22 '15 at 20:57
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    Has this been tested against actual, old contributions from page 1 users? Take a peek; are most of them actually less useful now than they were at the time of writing? My strong suspicion is that most super-high-rep users' answers will often be put in a way that transcends a specific version. – Pekka 웃 Jul 22 '15 at 20:57
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I think you are missing the point. Reputation was never about skill (though it takes some to get it). It is a measure of your contributions to the community, and those last forever.

In summary, I don't see any value in this feature.

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    Nice summary, the rest of your post was too long to read. :) – TZHX Jul 22 '15 at 21:39
  • @TZHX And here I thought the main body was too short :D – BradleyDotNET Jul 22 '15 at 22:36
  • @TZHX yeah, the vast wall of text that makes up the first paragraph was too much for me too. Glad there was a summary! – Mark Amery Dec 26 '15 at 23:20

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