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I was reviewing some posts and came across an answer where OP's username was Serversitters.com.

I'm not entirely sure how to deal with this, specifically, if I should flag this user for spamming. The answer itself seems to be valid.

My search on meta has yielded no results so far. Should I flag usernames like this? If so how would I do it properly?

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    Are you, by any chance, promoting the NEWD art show? – Glorfindel Jul 22 '15 at 12:53
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    If my username was www.Newd.com I might be. Especially if I was posting on a website about art shows. – Newd Jul 22 '15 at 12:55
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    @Newd, we have a lot of users named "StackOverflow". Would that constitute recursive self-spamming? – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 22 '15 at 13:03
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    for sake clarification, I think it should be DisplayName, not UserName. and thats what its named in Profile – HaveNoDisplayName Jul 22 '15 at 19:20
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    I think @HaveNoDisplayName might be onto something here... Not what they said, that is... – Ben Jul 23 '15 at 4:46
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    Try to search for users whose names end by .com (there's a bunch of them, and that's just .com domain; though not all of them promote their own site, or any site). – TLama Jul 23 '15 at 18:45
  • If you think an issue exists with a username, it's probably best to raise a custom moderator flag on one of their posts explaining why there's a problem with the username. There have been cases before where usernames have been reset. – AStopher Jul 23 '15 at 20:39
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    Can't it sometimes actually be useful? Kind of a disclosure of who this person is without needing to go to their profile. – LisaMM Jul 24 '15 at 11:43
  • @LisaMM Sorry to necro, but for the record, disclosure can't just be a username. If you wanted to link something on your blog at LisaMM.com, it wouldn't be enough just to have your username be LisaMM or LisaMM.com -- you'd have to explicitly say, right next to the link, that it's yours. Something like "If you want to download this source, it's available at my blog post here", which has, in the prose introducing the link, something that makes it obvious that it's yours. – Nic Hartley Oct 17 '17 at 21:05
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Usernames cannot be considered spam. You may find them to be offensive, abusive, or inappropriate in which case you should definitely flag them but users are allowed to have website/company name as their username. Spam would be an irrelevant link in a question or answer which serves no useful purpose.

Robert Cartaino♦ stated this on Meta Stack Exchange:

It's not indiscriminate advertising... it's a username; and it's not a part of the information content of this site. In short, there is no "spam" to a username.

Reference: Usernames as Advertising or Spam?

If the post is on-topic and has useful content then no need to flag it in this case.

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    Perfect, this was the information I was looking for. Thanks! – Newd Jul 22 '15 at 13:12
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    If it said... "VISIT somesite.com" - that certainly would be iffy though :p – Jon Clements Jul 22 '15 at 13:14
  • @JonClements I agree but would that call for a flag? – Aziz Shaikh Jul 22 '15 at 13:16
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    @JonClements For added contemplation, what if the username was a website that offended someone? Something erotic, political, racial, or religion based? Personally I think it would be beneficial to just say "No URLs as usernames" but I don't really make the rules around here :-) – Newd Jul 22 '15 at 13:18
  • @Newd JonClements may provide a better response, however inappropriate, offensive, or pornographic usernames/gravatars are not allowed. You may flag that user's post for moderation attention and mention that in your comments. – Aziz Shaikh Jul 22 '15 at 13:23
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    @Newd Aziz is right in his last comment... those aren't tolerated. If you spot a user, with a user name that's a website, and they're just answering/asking just to get their site listed in a subtle way, there's no hard and fast rules, so the mods will look at it on a case by case basis, and take any necessary action. If you spot that kind of thing then use flag->other and explain that you suspect they're self-promoting by their username, give a link to a couple of others posts (if possible) and make it clear it's not about the post's content, but rather the name etc...) - we'll look at it – Jon Clements Jul 22 '15 at 13:38
  • I was really hoping there would be a line at the end: "Oh, by the way, don't forget to check out my new blog about advertising www.xyz.com!" Alas... – Mike Jul 22 '15 at 19:06
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    @JonClements, your edit seems to change the meaning in exactly the wrong way. Usernames can be offensive etc., not "can't". – Kirk Woll Jul 22 '15 at 19:08
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    Is this " They can't be offensive, abusive, or inappropriate (which you should flag)" supposed to read "they can be..." or am I misunderstanding you. – Dan Neely Jul 22 '15 at 19:13
  • @DanNeely to be a bit more clear I have edited the post and removed "can/can't" altogether. Let me know if its better now. – Aziz Shaikh Jul 22 '15 at 19:19
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    I believe that @Jon's edit was based on a misunderstanding of Aziz's intent. That is, both Aziz and Jon intend to mean that offensive, etc. usernames are not allowed, but differ on their usage of "can" and "can't" to express that. I've attempted to clarify the wording in a manner consistent with Aziz's original. Jon seems to mean "can't" in the sense of "are not allowed to be", but especially in context that's confusing. I hope my edit has removed the ambiguity that existed in both versions prior. – Peter Duniho Jul 22 '15 at 19:19
  • @PeterDuniho oops! sorry i made an edit at the same time which has overridden your edit. – Aziz Shaikh Jul 22 '15 at 19:22
  • Not a problem...we were both trying to fix the same problem, and your edit works just as well as mine. – Peter Duniho Jul 22 '15 at 19:22
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    @BillWoodger don't be snarfle wombat silly - it's fish fingers perfectly woohoo sneeze custard safe :p – Jon Clements Jul 24 '15 at 12:30
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    It's worth mentioning that many organizations (or individuals acting as organizations) create accounts with the name of that organization to act as a public face: For example, Dimitri van Heesch's SO account is named "Doxygen", after his pet project. By posting on the site under this name he advertises his project, but also acts as an official source for all Doxygen-related questions. – Eric Dand Jul 25 '15 at 0:58
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As mentioned, having a URL or a company/product name in a username alone doesn't automatically make a user a spammer.

However, once they do start posting spam...

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