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I answered the question here and noticed it was down voted and recently closed as too broad. Now I understand the author worded the question horribly, and showed no attempt at a solution. However to be fair this user doesn't seem to speak English that well and coming up with a solution can be difficult if you don't have experience with simulating rigid body physics.

However I don't think the question was too broad (Update: It appears sometimes questions that show no effort are closed as too broad. I did not know that when I wrote this). There are only two ways to simulate universal gravitation in Sprite Kit. Either calculate it yourself or use the SKFieldNode class to let the physics engine handle it.

Not to mention, I looked around and found a similar question here which basically asks the same question except worded better.

The only reason I care is because in principle it is a good question and future readers looking to simulate universal gravitation in Sprite Kit could find the answer(s) there. Someone could also provide another answer to this question showing how to solve the problem using SKFieldNodes as well.

So what should be done? Should the question remain closed? Should the question be closed for some other reason? Should the question be edited to be worded much better (although to do this the question will probably need to be edited too much)? Should I just post the question again under my account and answer it and remove my answer from this question?

It is clear the question should remain closed as it is unsalvageable. The question now is, should I re-create the question and answer it. See my answer to this question.

What do you all think of this scenario?

Update:

  • For those unfamiliar with Sprite Kit, it has its own Physics Engine. You don't need to create a physics engine as the up-voted answer to this question proposes to simulate this (otherwise it would totally be too broad of a question). I understand that the user showed no attempt (just like the Box2D question here), but the question in principle is useful. I've answered questions about how to simulate buoyancy, centripetal motion, etc. Sometimes the OP of those questions has code showing what they tried, sometimes they don't. I still think they are very useful questions for people making a game with Sprite Kit.
  • I personally don't think the question should be re-opened because of how badly it is worded and structured. It would have to be edited too much to be re-opened. So the question now is, should I just re-create the question and answer it. Or wait for another user to ask the same question but better, then answer it when the time comes.
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    To salvage it you could 'imagine' that the user looked at SKPhysicsBody and CGVector but didn't understand how to bring velocity into play. Or something like that. Edit in that free interpretation just to get it above the too broad mark... – rene Jul 20 '15 at 16:37
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    Too Broad is often used as a replacement for No Effort. The user showed absolutely no effort was expended before he ... got you to answer his question/do his work for him. – Ripped Off Jul 20 '15 at 16:38
  • @Will But the Box2D link I posted shows no effort either? – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 16:55
  • So to my understanding, this question was really closed as showing no effort? (Which I completely agree with, as I have said before) – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:02
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    @EpicByte it's hard to point to another question and use it as an example of "hey this question did it, so it must be right!" Because a) rules change over time b)some tags are more/less lenient than others and c) even good questions get downvoted and crap gets upvoted, so it's hard to point to ONE example and use it as reference :( – Patrice Jul 20 '15 at 17:20
  • Editing is the right move when you think that a question was closed improperly, but I don't think that your edit here was in the correct direction; you've actually made it more broad. When I looked at the question just now, my first thoughts were "What kind of objects? How are you representing them? Are you using a physics framework already?" These questions are actually answered by the original version. – jscs Jul 20 '15 at 17:26
  • I don't appreciate the edit @Deduplicator made on my post here meta.stackoverflow.com/posts/299702/revisions If you want to comment on my question then do so, but it is very wrong to edit my question like that. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:26
  • Well, it's just some useful meta-information. Very relevant that your example-question is old. – Deduplicator Jul 20 '15 at 17:27
  • @JoshCaswell The Sprite-Kit tag makes this obvious. The user had tags in the question. And yes I agree that the user mentioning "objects" is a reason why I think it was a badly worded question. But my edits to the question did not affect that. I simply removed the tags and changed use to simulate. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:27
  • Taking tags out of the title is generally a good thing, though sometimes repeating the language information there is okay, when the task is quite general and there might need to be a version of the question per language. But taking that information out of the question body doesn't make the post any clearer, easier to find, or more answerable; it makes it worse. – jscs Jul 20 '15 at 17:31
  • @JoshCaswell The OP should never have used "objects." However for those using Sprite Kit that easily implies SKNodes (given that is the ONLY object that would make sense for the question). Removing that from the question has no effect at all on the clarity of the question for those who work with Sprite Kit. Even if I added it back the question is still horribly worded. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:35
  • @Patrice I'm just showing an example of a BETTER worded question. The question in principle is a useful question, but was asked by someone who posted the question horribly. What if this question was asked by someone who worded it correctly and showed code and visuals detailing what they were trying to do. Then the question would be great and very useful to future readers. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:40
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    "If lousy questions aren't allowed on StackOverflow, then why is THIS lousy question still around!" Touche, good sir. You've got me dead to rights. Because at least one crap question has managed to luck its way by, then we must allow all of them. Or... or... maybe we don't? Perhaps we should accept that, with damn near 10m questions curated by fallible human beings, some percentage of lousy questions that should have been closed manage to get in? I think that's safe to say. Now, if you will excuse me, I'm off to downvote and VTC more lousy questions. – Ripped Off Jul 20 '15 at 17:53
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    Yes, we can disagree. We'll be waiting for you here once you get sick of the help vampires sucking you dry :) – Ripped Off Jul 20 '15 at 18:03
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    I upvoted your answer at the time (and tweaked the grammar in the question a little), and almost left you a note saying that perhaps you should edit the question too. I'm going to suggest that now. Your answer is good, the question isn't, and you're allowed to edit questions, so why not make the question deserving of your answer?... Edit: I see you've already done that. All good. – Stephen Kennedy Jul 22 '15 at 14:26
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Yes. Yes, it was.

I have two objects. How do you make them attracted to each other by the force of gravity? And how to use there mass? (if object has big mass, it should gravitate more).

Physics are hard. There's a lot of nuance to them and a lot of things depend on a lot of other things. The biggest thing here is that this seems to be more of an elementary physics question more than a programming question (at first), since Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation would sort out the math between the gravitational pull of two objects.

Then you get deeper into the mix with the physics engine that needs to be written to accommodate this. Just using Swift is possible but you'd write copious amounts of code just to get close.

It's not clear what you want to accomplish; do you want to be able to say what the gravity is between the two objects? Do you want to see the two objects moving around each other? If it's the former, some research into Newton's Law would have helped; if it's the latter, you're going to need to provide us with way more into what you actually did, and with what physics engine you elected to use.

Unless you come up with some code that you've written to get you most of the way to this goal, I feel like this question should stay closed.

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    You don't need to write a physics engine, the question was tagged as Sprite-Kit. Sprite Kit already has a physics engine. And I think it is very clear that the user is looking to simulate universal gravitation using Sprite Kit. The same question was asked for Box2D here stackoverflow.com/q/6758060/2158465 and it got up-voted. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 16:54
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    That question was created before I registered here, and the standards may not have been as exacting. Given the state of both questions, I'm not sure that either should exist. – Makoto Jul 20 '15 at 16:55
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    How is it too broad though? The question is asking how to simulate universal gravitation? I understand that the user showed no effort, but the question in principle is useful. I've answered questions about how to simulate buoyancy, centripetal motion, etc. Sometimes the OP of those questions has code showing what they tried, sometimes they don't. I still think they are very useful questions for people making a game with Sprite Kit. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 16:58
  • I don't get why this is getting up-voted. It is simply wrong. 1) You don't need to write a physics engine. 2) The quote "do you want to be able to say what the gravity is between the two objects? Do you want to see the two objects moving around each other?" is the SAME thing. You need to calculate the force of gravity to get the motion effect. The latter depends on the former. People are over-thinking this, the question is asking how to simulate universal gravitation. The question was horribly worded. But the question in principle is good. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:43
  • So the question now is, should I just re-create the question and answer it. Or wait for another user to ask the same question but better, then answer it when the time comes. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:44
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    If you can reword the question so that it doesn't immediately come across as massively broad in scope, then I would encourage you to do so. It's even better if you can self-answer it, too. – Makoto Jul 20 '15 at 17:45
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    The presence of a tag, even one as specific as Sprite Kit, is not a good substitute for words that clearly frame the context/scope of a Question. Tags are for searching, and the body of a Question should be as self-contained as practical. – hardmath Jul 20 '15 at 17:45
  • @Makoto See my answer, and thanks for your input. – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 17:55
  • @hardmath Ok so the question should have said something like: "I am using Sprite Kit so I don't need a solution to re-create a physics engine. I need a solution that uses Sprite Kit"? – Epic Byte Jul 20 '15 at 19:38
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    @EpicByte: No, they should have shown code that creates some nodes. Right now it isn't clear whether they know Swift, or someone told them to use it and they need an entire lesson on getting the most trivial Swift application to compile and run. Here is a question showing no effort that I voted to close as "Too Broad", because it isn't clear what the asker knows and doesn't know, and covering everything they appear to not know would take a whole book. – Ben Voigt Jul 21 '15 at 23:10
  • @BenVoigt Seriously, that is a huge assumption. You think he needs to prove he knows how to code in Swift by creating nodes? That is absolutely ridiculous. This is a site for professionals, we don't need to prove we know how to use a certain technology when asking a question. Not to mention in this specific case the nodes could have been made in a level editor. – Epic Byte Jul 22 '15 at 0:10
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I'm going to answer my own question here. Based on the up-votes/down-votes this receives will be a deciding factor in how to solve the issue.

The question in principle is good. How to simulate universal gravitation in Sprite Kit can be very helpful to users creating games with Sprite Kit. I have answered questions in the past about how to simulate buoyancy, centripetal motion, etc.

The problem is (and it looks like we all agree) that the question asked by the OP was written horribly. It showed no effort, and used broad terms like "objects." It is difficult to salvage the question in its current form.

So I propose I simply ask the question on my account (but much better obviously) and move my answer to this new question instead. That way future readers can easily find a solution to universal gravitation in Sprite Kit.

Additionally, this allows another person to add an answer showing how to simulate universal gravitation using SKFieldNodes (There are only two ways to simulate universal gravitation in Sprite Kit. Either calculate it yourself or use the SKFieldNode class to let the physics engine handle more of the work).

Update Some people have edited the question more and are voting to re-open the question. If the question re-opens maybe I will not post another question and will just leave my answer there?

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