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I've stumbled over a user that didn't disclose that they link to their own off-site content other than that the plain URL contains their name. The posts are very extensive, but the SO posts seem too short (I don't have the proper domain knowledge so I'm going with a length criteria).

For example it contains two paragraphs which may answer the question and a link as such:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren.

No sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam.

http://name-of-poster-as-domain.tld/path/to/blog/post#jump-id

After further investigation he has 35 of such answers out of over 70 answers in total. Some of them contain tables with benchmark results. Only one of the several questions that I looked at links to the homepage of the blog.

The question is: Are links like this fine or is it necessary to make it clearer that the user is linking to their own content? If it's the latter, what would be more appropriate?

If it is not ok, should I edit it or do I outright flag for moderator attention?

  • 7
    What proportion of their answers contain links to their own site? If a substantial majority, that's a problem in itself and warrants a mod flag. – Nathan Tuggy Jul 19 '15 at 0:43
  • @NathanTuggy Good point! Slightly less than 50% of his answers contain links to different posts on his blog. – Artjom B. Jul 19 '15 at 11:27
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    It's hard to talk about this in hypotheticals. Just link to the user, and maybe let them know about this discussion. – Kevin Workman Jul 20 '15 at 13:50
  • @Kevin I have let him know about this discussion with a list of their self-promoting posts. I also invited him to join the discussion. He only edited 3 of his answers to include a clearer disclosure. I want to give him a little more time, but I think I'll eventually add a link to those answers. I feel like this should be evaluated by somebody who has the necessary domain knowledge whether the answers actually provide some guidance aside from the link and filler text for that link. – Artjom B. Jul 20 '15 at 14:41
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    I should point out that I am not really self promoting. Everything on my site is free and based on my 45+ years experience of computer system performance, including writing and running benchmarks on everything from supercomputers to Android devices. On my site there are 69 zip/tar.gz files with benchmarks and source codes and 74 HTML reports. If you feel that nobody here benefits from my knowledge, I will not waste my time contributing. – Roy Longbottom Jul 20 '15 at 16:14
  • @Roy You're certainly contributing well thought out work and back it up with data. There are some post though that are little short on details which your pages behind the links certainly provide. But then again, I'm not somebody who can assess whether those answers are acceptable in the tag you're contributing to. – Artjom B. Jul 20 '15 at 17:21
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    I sometimes edit such posts and put the link on a human readable description (usually the name of the article), thus the domain name is not visible any more. – Thomas Weller Jul 21 '15 at 7:52
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    Are they withholding necessary information that is contained in the blog posts? Because if that is the case, then it's an insufficient answer anyway as all information necessary to answer a question must be contained in the answer post. Linking is fine to cite a source or as further reading but it should never be needed. – SuperBiasedMan Jul 21 '15 at 9:51
  • @SuperBiasedMan It's a little thin, but they do seem to answer the questions. – Artjom B. Jul 21 '15 at 9:53
  • I find it astonishing that there are so many quotes from those who don’t seem to know the difference between a blog and a large number of detailed technical reports from an experienced computer performance engineer. – Roy Longbottom Jul 21 '15 at 20:56
  • @Roy, that just means that your blog consists of detailed technical reports. I find it a bit odd that you've repeatedly cited your experience and credentials rather than the quality of your answers. – TigerhawkT3 Jul 21 '15 at 21:04
  • @RoyLongbottom I wanted to make this as general as possible. Sadly such a collection of detailed documents is rare on SO, so I used the blog example, because they are quite common and they can also contain vast amounts of technical knowledge. – Artjom B. Jul 21 '15 at 21:05
  • I find this witch hunt completely intolerable and incompatible with the Reputation rankings and personal thanks from questioners for detailed answers provided. There is SuperBiasedMan who retrospectively repeated the allegations in two of my posts, one of which has a score of 4 as a useful answer. Then the final straw was TigerHawkT3 who provided the most hurtful and unfounded comments. This is my Last Post. – Roy Longbottom Jul 23 '15 at 10:36
  • @Roy Longbottom I'm sorry to hear that. This has nothing to do with this meta-question, but there are two things that I want say. There is a recent discussion about upvotes which tries to fix a preceived problem that short and easy posts are incorrectly upvoted. I'm not saying that definetly happened to you, though. – Artjom B. Jul 23 '15 at 11:00
  • @Roy The other thing is that StackExchange tries to be a Wiki for all kinds of information. As such, questions and answers should be self-contained. You linking to your site is fine, but you have to ask yourself whether all your answers will still have the same value as they have today when your site is down. There can be all kinds of reasons for this to happen. We would only like to ensure that if (when) this does (it happens all the time), that your answers don't lose value. I haven't looked at all of your answers, but I'm sure some would benefit from a little more description and code. – Artjom B. Jul 23 '15 at 11:06
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Not everyone reads the link text, so a link without any other indication is not enough in my opinion. It is too easy to hide your affiliation. And let's not forget that display names can change, so while the domain might have matched the user name initially, 3 months later, it might be different and no longer attributed at all.

Simply prefacing it with the word "My..." should be enough

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren.

No sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam.

Read more about it in my blog here: http://name-of-poster-as-domain.tld/path/to/blog/post#jump-id

How to handle this, I think it depends. If it looks like the user may have provided multiple unattributed links in many answers, then an "other" flag is appropriate so the mods can investigate if he is truly a serial spammer or just someone who likes to post the same link.

But if it is clearly their first offense, a comment, downvote and/or edit are all appropriate, depending on the quality of the answer. If it is a fantastic answer with an unfortunate unattributed link, an edit might be the right choice. But a terrible answer is probably downvote worthy, and maybe even a spam flag depending on how bad the situation is. If the post falls somewhere in the middle, then commenting and possibly editing are the best choices.

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    I really dislike raw links. Knowing the URL does not provide a real benefit. I prefer Read more about it in [my article about Lorem ipsum](http://name-of-poster-as-domain.tld/path/to/blog/post#jump-id) – Thomas Weller Jul 21 '15 at 7:54
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Are links like this fine or is it necessary to make it clearer that the user is linking to their own content? If it's the latter, what would be more appropriate?

Well, it depends.

If the user is linking to their personal homepage or something else entirely irrelevant to the question, then no, this is not OK. We already have a place for linking to your homepage, and people really shouldn't be doing that elsewhere. I'm pretty sure we have a ban on signatures for exactly the same reason. If people want to read your homepage, they can stand clicking through to your profile first.

If it's a link-only answer, that's not really great either. This is the case even if the link does answer the question. But we've beaten that horse to death at least three times now, so I'm just going to stop there.

For other things, I think this is very much a gray area. For example, several of our users are current or former Microsoft employees. Is it wrong for them to link to MSDN when describing a Microsoft API? I hope not. Of course, MSDN has the advantage that it is at least official, but I can easily imagine Mozilla employees linking to MDN when explaining HTML, and I don't really see anything wrong with that either (mostly because I find the official W3C standards mildly hard to read).

But on the other hand, it can be taken too far. Personal blog posts, which lack editorial control, should probably be labeled as such, regardless of who wrote them (or at least, they should be so labeled if you're using them as a source of information and not as a wakeup call). Some blog posts are really good sources of information, but blogs in general require greater vigilance from the careful reader. This is especially true if the author of the blog post is also the author of the answer. I'm not sure if we should specifically require a "my blog post" in that case, but including it can't really hurt, so I would encourage answerers who blog to say so when they're linking to their own content.

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